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Ludba
11-21-2002, 07:33 PM
My dad once told me,"You can't learn how to play with others until you've learned to play with yourself."

Well, I've found some pretty effective ways to use my solitary practice time, but I'm beginning to wonder what is the most effective way to improve when playing against a friend.

Ideas anyone?

Tom_In_Cincy
11-21-2002, 07:46 PM
I like to have sessions with a practice partner.. that include drills as well as games. One of the pitfalls of solitare practice is having to take time between shots to set up the drills.

With a practice partner.. they set up the drills, while you get a quicker feel of the stroke. You take 10 shots, they set it up 10 times.. then you switch.

Try practicing your 9 ball break shot with a partner.. you will find that you will get more feed back on the changes you make for speed and aiming.

This is a great way to practice 14.1 breaks also.

Playing a game with a practice partner.. you can start discussions about strategy, shape, table management, from both players perspective. Always a good thing to get an alternative source of feedback about your performance.

Terry
11-22-2002, 12:31 PM
I think one of the best things you can practice with a partner is shooting safties and getting out of safties. Play nineball with one shooter playing NOTHING but safties and the other shooter playing Nothing but the runout game. One players objective is to make the game last as long as possible while the other player is trying to make the game as short as possible. You can't play them in a tournament if you can't play them in practice. IMHO, Terry

Ludba
11-22-2002, 01:21 PM
Now, that's a good idea.

Ludba
11-22-2002, 01:35 PM
"you can start discussions about strategy, shape, table management, from both players perspective"

I used to try this with the guy I used to play with, but he would usually just say that he didn't focus too much on strategy or thinking ahead, he "just likes to play." We would both get a little irritated, because I'm exactly the opposite. I mean, our modes of operating were incongruous: I'm trying to learn everything about this game, and he's sort of just not caring. It frustrated me, because he's a good player, but he has just stopped caring about improving from where he is. But he's a great guy, so I still play with him a little.

So I just started playing with this other guy who is an amazing player. We have plenty of discussions about strategy, shape, etc. I've learned a lot from him.

Even with the "little strategy" players, I'm usually able to learn something from the way they play or I'll just ask them why they wanted to go for a particular shot first.

Fred Agnir
11-22-2002, 01:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ludba:</font><hr> My dad once told me,"You can't learn how to play with others until you've learned to play with yourself."<hr /></blockquote>
He wasn't talking about pool.

Fred &lt;~~~ still learning?

Ludba
11-22-2002, 03:58 PM
"still learning?"

practicing everyday.

Popcorn
11-22-2002, 04:44 PM
There is also a different pace to the game when you play an opponent then when you play by yourself. You definitely need to do both.