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View Full Version : Do you guys replace your Cue Tips yourself ?



bigbro6060
11-21-2002, 09:35 PM
I'm too scared to

I prefer to leave it to an expert

anyone here do it themselves ?

Tom_In_Cincy
11-21-2002, 10:04 PM
Been replacing my own tips for 15+ years.

bigbro6060
11-21-2002, 10:10 PM
Tom, overall is it easy ?

can i ruin a cue if i do anything wrong ?

cheers

PQQLK9
11-21-2002, 10:14 PM
I have done my own with sized tips, however since I don't have a lathe I usually get my cue person to do the ones that need to be sized.

stickman
11-21-2002, 11:20 PM
I do my own. The layered tips require a good deal of care, but the nonlayered are fairly easy.

Chris Cass
11-22-2002, 01:33 AM
Hi Bro,

Both is my answer. You couldn't tell the difference between the two.

Regards,

C.C.~~with my .02 /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Rich R.
11-22-2002, 05:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bigbro6060:</font><hr> Tom, overall is it easy ?

can i ruin a cue if i do anything wrong ?

cheers <hr /></blockquote>
bigbro, you may be able to ruin a ferrule, but I don't think you could ruin the whole cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
There are many little tricks to replacing a tip, trimming and shaping it properly. Many of the posters here have been doing it for many years and have a lot of experience. Some make and/or repair cues and they are very good at replacing tips. I have replaced tips on the house cues for my home table, but I go to a qualified repairman to take care of my playing cue.
If your cue is no expensive, you may want to give it a try.
If your cue is expensive or you are really unsure of yourself, have some one else do it.
Keep in mind, to replace tips yourself, there are some basic tools you will need, such as cue top sander.

Paul_Mon
11-22-2002, 05:31 AM
Yes I do. The layered tips require a little more patience. And yes, you can screw up the ferrule if you're not careful.

Paul Mon~~~~~have done about 40 tips

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bigbro6060:</font><hr> I'm too scared to

I prefer to leave it to an expert

anyone here do it themselves ? <hr /></blockquote>

heater451
11-22-2002, 08:58 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> . . .to replace tips yourself, there are some basic tools you will need, such as cue top sander.<hr /></blockquote>I have only replaced a couple of tips, myself, with minimal equipment, but it wasn't too hard. I tried to compensate for the lack of tools with patience and attention to detail.

I did not have a ferrule sander (like the CueTop Sander), so I used a piece of wood with a hole just large enough to fit the ferrule through. The important thing was getting the hole bored perpendicular to the surface of the wood (the ferrule was a 13mm, so the 1/2" drill bit worked fine). Then I could 'feed' the ferrule through the wood, just enough to sand the tip remains off of it--using a block to back up the sandpaper. This is where being cautious pays off.

One tool required, however, is some kind of clamping setup, once the gluing is done. I have one of the really cheap 2-pieces-of-plastic jigs that come with one of those "tip repair kits" that you can get at Sears or Sports Authority (got mine w/the table--I would buy better, if I had none).

I used Duro Superglue gel, as I've seen it recommended here.

The hardest thing I found was centering the tip on the cue. Even though I used an oversize tip for the ferrule, and was expecting to trim it, I thought it would be easier if I could have gotten the overlap even all around. I didn't, but it still trimmed off okay. I don't know, if it would be alright with a layered tip.

The trimming was done with the shaft on an adapter, chucked in a (mounted) hand drill see previous thread (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccbboard&amp;Number=42679&amp; page=&amp;view=&amp;sb=&amp;o=). I used a razor blade (be extremely careful), followed by successively finer grades of sandpaper to trim the tip. This is another "pay close attention" operation. A bit of tape on the ferrule may help protect it.

I didn't use tape on the ferrule, and scratched it at first. Luckily, the scratches weren't that deep, and, in fact, they were responsible for me learning something else: A plastic ferrule can be nicely polished, using rubbing and polishing compound (found at any Pep Boys or Autozone).

The tips I did were for friends' break cues, which is why I undertook it myself. After finishing the replacement, I hammered several racks open to check the attachment, and had no gluing failures. I also haven't heard anything bad from my friends, although it's only been about 4 months (since the first tip).



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smfsrca
11-22-2002, 10:53 AM
Can anyone recommend which tool works best?

I did my own for a while, but the tools were crude. Now I just have it done on a lathe. If I could find a tool I feel comfortable with I might start doing it again.

Steve

Fred Agnir
11-22-2002, 11:06 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote smfsrca:</font><hr> Can anyone recommend which tool works best?

I did my own for a while, but the tools were crude. Now I just have it done on a lathe. If I could find a tool I feel comfortable with I might start doing it again.

Steve <hr /></blockquote>
I use the Rapid Top Sander, The Porper Big Shaver, and the Pocket Lathe.

I used to use... an emery file, a utility knife, and a curved piece of sandpaper.

I don't know if I've gotten any better results, but I have gotten quicker results.

I used an engine lathe once. It was fabulous. I gotta get me one, for no other reason than the sheer manliness of the experience.

Fred

Chris Cass
11-22-2002, 11:07 AM
Hi Steve,

The Willards Tip Machine. Worth the money and can also do a few on the side to pay that puppy off to boot.


Regards,

C.C.

Troy
11-22-2002, 12:16 PM
Not only do I do my own tips, but I support 4-5 pool rooms doing their house cues plus customer cues. I probably do 25-30 tips a week plus ferrule replacement, re-tapers, etc..... I use a Willard's and a lathe.

I've seen loads of do-it-yourself botched jobs brought to me to repair.

Troy...~~~ Loves the "Ultimate Tip Tool" 'cuz it brings me lots of work... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

SpiderMan
11-22-2002, 12:31 PM
I did my own for several years before beginning to do them
for hire. It's one thing to scratch your own ferrule or
have a tip come off your own cue during a match, quite
another thing entirely to mess up a job for someone who
paid for professional results.

Develop, understand, and follow your process exactly. Do
your technique experimentation where it's not critical.

I have an engine lathe and a Willard tool. The Willard
is nice and portable, but the lathe produces slightly
better results. I like the Willard for quickly and
precisely trimming mushrooms. I use an eye loupe and go
slow to prevent nicking ferrules with it.

Here's a layered tip over a red fiber pad. Click
thumbnail to enlarge:

http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/funkychateau/vwp?.dir=/SPetty+Predator+Talisman&amp;.dnm=New+Tip+Trimmed+%26+ Burnished.jpg&amp;.src=ph&amp;.view=t

SpiderMan

Tom_In_Cincy
11-22-2002, 05:21 PM
Overall, I would say it's easy.. but only from the standpoint that I have been doing it so long.

I would not recommend player doing their own tip if a good tip man is available.

Ludba
11-23-2002, 03:53 PM
Isn't it cheaper (and more convenient) to just pay $10 to get someone to do it? I've had it done a couple times for $10. Recently I got a layered tip put on for $20.