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View Full Version : "Snug bridge" theory



11-22-2002, 10:28 AM
I tried something today that made almost a world of difference in my shotmaking.. I loosened my bridge.

By doing so, I could easier tell if my arm was swinging or not, and I also felt alot more loose and relaxed playing, and was making shots easier than I have in the last couple years.

In the books, it says use a snug bridge, but I wonder if that is one of those "beginner tips" that can be changed once a person gets down a decent strait stroke? Naturally you snug up a little for shots with velocity or lots of english, but I don't use alot of english, and try not to shoot hard too much, so why the snug bridge?

I think Efren plays with a semi-loose bridge, as well as a few other pros.. while some play with almost a chokehold on the shaft..

any ideas, techniques, or questions?

/ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Fred Agnir
11-22-2002, 10:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Seattle-kid:</font><hr>


In the books, it says use a snug bridge, but I wonder if that is one of those "beginner tips" that can be changed once a person gets down a decent strait stroke? Naturally you snug up a little for shots with velocity or lots of english, but I don't use alot of english, and try not to shoot hard too much, so why the snug bridge?
<hr /></blockquote>
The snug bridge helps a stroke stay straight, I suppose. However, my personal opinion is that being able to use an open-hand bridge effectively is a sure sign of advancement. If your stroke is honed straight, then an open-hand or a loose closed bridge (which is really an open-hand v-bridge that has a finger over the top)should be fine.

I notice that a lot of professional players have a considerable amount of space between the finger loop and the stick. The index finger is just sort of there for the ride. So, your transition has precedence.

Fred

Chris Cass
11-22-2002, 11:05 AM
Tap, Tap, Tap.

C.C.

Popcorn
11-22-2002, 11:09 AM
It is a good idea, it lets you make those last fraction of a second adjustments you need to do. Even the loop of the bridge itself can be adjusted. A slight tilt of the hand, movement of the fingers or other small movements all play a part of zeroing in on the shot. Your hand should be steady but not frozen in place so as to not allow any adjusting. In my opinion anyway.

smfsrca
11-22-2002, 11:25 AM
It could be that loosening up your bridge has also caused you to loosen up your grip. In practice I have noticed that the tension in the bridge hand may have some influence on the tension in your grip hand. Try to make a tight fist with your left hand without adding tension to the muscles of your right hand.

Other than providing a groove for the cue to ride freely on I don't believe the bridge should influence your stroke. The groove (straightness and smoothness) of your stroke should be controlled entirely by your gripping hand/arm.
The bridge should be solid to the bed with at least 3 points of contact pushing into the table bed and should remain there unwavering until after the completion of your follow through and then some.

Steve

11-22-2002, 11:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Seattle-kid:</font><hr>


In the books, it says use a snug bridge, but I wonder if that is one of those "beginner tips" that can be changed once a person gets down a decent strait stroke? Naturally you snug up a little for shots with velocity or lots of english, but I don't use alot of english, and try not to shoot hard too much, so why the snug bridge?
<hr /></blockquote>
The snug bridge helps a stroke stay straight, I suppose. However, my personal opinion is that being able to use an open-hand bridge effectively is a sure sign of advancement. If your stroke is honed straight, then an open-hand or a loose closed bridge (which is really an open-hand v-bridge that has a finger over the top)should be fine.

I notice that a lot of professional players have a considerable amount of space between the finger loop and the stick. The index finger is just sort of there for the ride. So, your transition has precedence.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

This is true, IMO. I use the open "V" bridge anywhere I can, but for certain shots, a looped bridge just feels more natural. Snooker players use the V bridge almost exclusively.. so it's gotta tell you something about it I suppose.

I don't know.. I just feel like maybe I've been a little TOO snug on the bridge hand, and need to loosen up.. more for relaxation than anything. It seems that if any of your body is tensed up, it makes you mind tense up also. (??)