PDA

View Full Version : Pool and Regular Work



rackmup
11-22-2002, 12:24 PM
This is a post at AZBilliards.com message forum:

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Matthew:</font><hr>Pool and Regular work
Posted By: matthew wagn0339@mrs.umn.edu
Date: November 21, 2002, at 6:01 p.m.

Do you guys think it is possible to have a regular job and still be a great pool player?<hr /></blockquote>

Any ideas from the CCB'ers for Matthew?

rackmup
11-22-2002, 12:32 PM
Let's assume Matthew has the game to be in the TOP 10 of all professional pool players. Let's assume he has endorsement contracts with a major cue and table manufacturer. Further, let's assume he earns appearance money for the "Major" tournaments. With side bets, mini-tournaments and a NIKE Billiard Shoe contract (I'm certain Phil will introduce 9-ball shoes soon!), Matthew should be able to make six figures.

If this is what Matthew wants to be happy, then forgo an education and go for it!

But let's be honest: How many pool players have the God-given talents, marketing, sponsors, transportation costs, lodging expenses, entry fees, etc. to make a go at playing pool for a living?

If it were me personally, and I could choose pool over say, a career as an Attorney? The Attorney gig wins out everytime!

Mercedes S Class, an office with a view of the bay, house in the 'burbs, and cheese in the bank: Yep...that's what I would take!

Regards,

Ken

Cueless Joey
11-22-2002, 12:37 PM
A mind is a terrible thing to waste.
You'll get sick of pool sooner or later if you HAD to play it to make a living. Let's ask Keith and Rempe.

ChrisW
11-22-2002, 01:12 PM
To me it looks like Matthew is asking if quitting his job is the only way to become a great player. One could easily think that way since playing great pool takes up a lot of valuable time. Although I think it is possible if you are realistic with your goals.
If you are happy winning local and regional tournaments then it is possible to keep your job.
If your goal is to be a pro then you need to practice 8hrs a day which would make pool your job.
I would consider both these options as playing great pool.

Personally I hope for improvement to the point of a pro level but I don't ever expect to go pro.

My 2.5 cents
Chris

bluewolf
11-22-2002, 01:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote rackmup:</font><hr> This is a post at AZBilliards.com message forum:

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Matthew:</font><hr>Pool and Regular work
Posted By: matthew wagn0339@mrs.umn.edu
Date: November 21, 2002, at 6:01 p.m.

Do you guys think it is possible to have a regular job and still be a great pool player?<hr /></blockquote>

Any ideas from the CCB'ers for Matthew?
<hr /></blockquote>

Is this the same Matthew who is 16 or 17?

Personally, I believe it is possible to become a very good player while having a fulltime job. Most of us, if we are real gungho can fit in 4-7 two hour practice sessions a week and lessons from a good instruction.

To be a champion. I would say no. Once a person makes the pro circuit, I think a decision would have to be made one way or another.

blu

Perk
11-22-2002, 02:05 PM
I posted a response on that board..but in short..i feel that in life you can do many things and be good..what you focus on can provide greatness...If he sets his priorities to WORK and then Pool, and doesnt take up any other habits (golf/bowling/family) that take up time he can become good at both. With a decision on dropping work at a later date...But a chance at a lawyer? I am trying to think of any lawyers I know that have to bum cigarrates, food, money to get by, and beg for backers to make money, sleep outside of pool halls on the ground/cars/bushes....

Damn..Now I want to become a hustler...cant wait for Pool Hall Junkies to come out so we can see the teenage push! Might open up some jobs for the unemployed that WANT to work. Just my thoughts...sounded tempting...but I would and am taking a Good Job and Good Pool capabilities over the NO JOB and Great Pool capabilities....

&lt;--considering friends of mine have played players in the Top 50 in the world, I wonder what someone at #51 draws in from revenue /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif "Better grab my daughters piggy bank!"

WaltVA
11-22-2002, 03:24 PM
Jonathan made an excellent post at AZBilliards right after Perk. I hope Mathhew reads both and takes them to heart.

Walt in VA

Sid_Vicious
11-22-2002, 04:16 PM
Great pool player? Heck no! I think all of those who posted back so far answered correctly for players being good pool players, but "the great ones" simply need unrestricted time which allows them to be married to pool, nothing else tugging at their time. If you have thougts about Monday morning or that day's job task which was left unfinished, or the little wife making dinner, then you have a boggled mind to some level...it's bad for "great" regardless.

Now a working player with nothing else(no family or love life) can certainly become a very good player, but I'll put my side bet on the guy who lives for nothing but pool, and has no obligations EXCEPT for the next ball he/she is about to hit...sid

Popcorn
11-22-2002, 04:38 PM
It does not have to be one way or the other, a career or pool. You can combine the both if it is what you want. If you really love pool then your goal can be to have a little poolroom. Run right it will feed your family, keep you around what you love, allow you to play, run your own tournaments and so on. I am not so sure that being an attorney is necessarily the road to happiness and riches. You have to do what you like. I well run poolroom, even a small one can put $60,000 to $100,000 a year in your pocket, while letting you be around what you love. If it is what you want, you will find a way to get it. A lot of pros have rooms. Miz just opened another one himself.

bigbro6060
11-22-2002, 05:00 PM
Yeah Popcorn, it's not funny how many of the top snooker and pool players around here who work in Pool halls or work/own Pool table manufacturing companies

I personally enjoy my normal job and love Pool on the side. Unless i was a top Pro, i wouldn't want Pool to become my job

Voodoo Daddy
11-22-2002, 10:41 PM
Irving Crane was a Caddy salesman, Joe Balsis was a butcher...they were as great as it gets. Some players were/still are room owners like Larry Liscotti, C.J. Wiley and Dick Lane. Its possible to do it if your commited to excellence and driven to be the best at what you do...IMO.