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View Full Version : What's your Biggest WEAKNESS ?



bigbro6060
12-01-2002, 05:08 AM
in Pool i mean /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif so no saying Jim Bean or Blondies /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Now be honest. If you didn't have any weaknesses, you would be on TV playing Efren and Earl.

My biggest weakness would be my kicking. I intend to put in some major practice into it soon, but i've been focusing on my cue ball control this past month or two.

another weakness i have is consistency on the break. I'm either making balls every break and hitting the rack solid, or i'm picking the whitey off the floor from flyers

Leviathan
12-01-2002, 08:06 AM
Poor stroke mechanics! Anyone can learn the theory of aiming and cue-ball control, but that knowledge isn't worth much unless one has a dependable stroke to apply it with. My own play isn't going to improve significantly until I abandon the game I've got (not a big loss), go back to square one, and spend a year working on things I should have learned as a kid.

D.M.

rackmup
12-01-2002, 09:07 AM
...I listed my strengths!

My weakness? Oh, there is more than one!

Straight in shots.
Maintaining a competitive focus.
Cueball control on the break.
Kicking.
Long rail banks.

My list of strengths:

Cut shots, any length.
Racking. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif
Woofing. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

Ken

OnePocketChamp
12-01-2002, 09:27 AM
Thin cut shots /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif
Discipline to lay off shots I know I shouldn't shoot
Women with great racks /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Games of 9 ball with Rackmup /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif
Oh, did I mention women with great racks!!!!!!

Cueless Joey
12-01-2002, 11:11 AM
Tall brunette with olive skin and long silky hair. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Kicking and lack of killer instinct.
Besides pocketing and positioning of course. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

stickman
12-01-2002, 11:29 AM
It depends on what day of the week it is. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif The one that stands out for me right now is my banking. I used to be a much stronger banker, but I practiced banks banks a lot. It only occured to me that I had dropped them from my practice routine when I noticed that it was becoming a big weakness in my game.

12-01-2002, 11:43 AM
Shot selection. It seems like I can always get the first five or six balls off but then I always seem to hose myself. Has anyone ever figured out a system to better shot selection??

Mike D2
12-01-2002, 01:15 PM
I think that my biggest weakness is when the guy or lady that I am playing slows there game down to death. It sucks watching them look at the same ball for about ten minutes.

12-01-2002, 02:48 PM
Mike, I thought you might be Earl Strickland--but then I realized that Mr. Strickland wouldn't see his impatience as a weakness! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Three unsolicited suggestions from a slow player: 1. Never let your opponent sense your impatience--he or she will slow down even more, and start playing safeties. 2. Use the waiting time constructively--re-check your plans for dealing with bad balls, study your opponent's moves, clean your hands, etc. 3. Don't let your impatience provoke you into bad sportsmanship. Your opponents have a right to think before they shoot. Good luck (and never, ever match up with anyone who has read your post). Goldfish.

smfsrca
12-01-2002, 04:29 PM
When another's slow play begins to bother you your knee-jerk reaction is to speed up the game. So, you start going for shots where you should be playing safe. Resign yourself to the slow play. Do you have anywhere else to go? While your sitting there waiting patiently for your opponent to relinquish the table, plan where your next safety is going to be, step to the table, confidently play your awesome safety and sit back down for another long wait. Enjoy the time off, relax, polish your shaft, practice your stroke, what ever it takes to hold your focus and not dwell on your opponents style. Say to yourself, if this is the way this guy plays he's got no chance.
I got my cure for slow play at the BCA Nationals. I was matched up against a player with Parkinsons Disease. The guy used a walker. It took him better then 5 minutes just to get to the table. He was playing as fast as he could. Now, once this guy was down on his shot he could make balls. He wasn't going to give it to me. So I slowed his game down and just wore him out. This race to 6 took between 2 and 3 hours. During the match my teammates would stop by and watch for a few minutes, shake their heads and leave. They just couldn't stand it. Imagine how I felt. I won 6-3. This story is legend amongst my peers who were there. "Stevie-Dee" vs. "Walker-man".
Steve

Icon of Sin
12-01-2002, 05:26 PM
my biggest weakness has to be the side pocket, straight in shots and banks on the side arnt that much of a problem, but I have trouble cutting the object ball into it. That is somthing I definately need to work on.

silverbullet
12-01-2002, 05:39 PM
focus.

Laura

Fred Agnir
12-02-2002, 09:45 AM
Having a full-time job.

Hope this helps,

Fred <~~~ wonders if someone already said this one.

ChrisW
12-02-2002, 10:12 AM
<font color="red"> </font color> MY BIG FAT HEAD GETTING IN THE WAY.
Always telling me how to:
Miss the easy ones
How to let the one-armed blind guy win
How to miss-cue
How to stay one win out of the money

heater451
12-02-2002, 11:56 AM
If you normally play fast, and would rather stick closer to 'your' game, rather than play defensive with a lot of strategy, you can get by with one change: Play even slower than your opponent.

It will probably aid your focus somewhat, but, psychologically, your goal is to break the opponent's rhythm, instead of letting them capitalize on breaking yours.

This should work, whether your opponent has a neurological disorder or not. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif



=====================

Kato
12-02-2002, 12:00 PM
Weaknesses?

Concentration
No killer instinct
Ball pocketing skills
Insane position
Lack of thought
Can not make a ball on the break to save my life and when I do it's usually white
can't jump
don't kick 1 rail well
poor mechanics
poor page
poor table management

What am I good at?

drinking beer
racking
chalking my cue

hey, knowing what you're bad at is half the battle.

Rod
12-02-2002, 01:27 PM
I don't play enough, it puts a tad bit of stress on my entire game.

12-02-2002, 02:44 PM
Top 3 in order:
1. Full time job
2. Lack of focus
3. sympathy for lessor(is that a word) players.

Randy

John G
12-02-2002, 03:34 PM
Totter,
"Mastering Pool" by George Fells has a good system on how to identify shots by number or alphbet, I don't remember which, but it will really help you to identify your problem balls and when or if you should or break them out. Good Luck

Tom_In_Cincy
12-02-2002, 04:58 PM
My biggest weakness is 'waiting' I hate to wait between matches in a poorly run tournament.

My biggest weakness at the table is thinking too much or not enough. Some of my player friends like to remind me that I a too fast at the table.. and my usual reply is "If it think too much.. I will miss"

12-02-2002, 06:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bigbro6060:</font><hr> in Pool i mean /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif so no saying Jim Bean or Blondies /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Now be honest. If you didn't have any weaknesses, you would be on TV playing Efren and Earl.

My biggest weakness would be my kicking. I intend to put in some major practice into it soon, but i've been focusing on my cue ball control this past month or two.

another weakness i have is consistency on the break. I'm either making balls every break and hitting the rack solid, or i'm picking the whitey off the floor from flyers <hr /></blockquote>

I always find a way to ruin the run-out. Usually a stupid shot that anyone could make, I'll botch it trying to get the angle I want, rather than the angle that the shot will provide naturally.

I'm not very good at banks as I would like to be. Uhm.. I'm too nice.. I feel bad for running a rack or two on someone who just wants to play... on those times when I DON'T screw up the run-outs. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

bigbro6060
12-02-2002, 08:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Seattle-kid:</font><hr>

I always find a way to ruin the run-out. Usually a stupid shot that anyone could make, I'll botch it trying to get the angle I want, rather than the angle that the shot will provide naturally.

<hr /></blockquote>

I also suffer from botched runouts due to one mistake (if practicing, i retake the shot to see if i can finish the runout). It's nothing specific, it's just a pot just missed or position stuffed by a few inches. It's just a case of heaps more practice to improve everything, be more consistent etc

I are starting to see the runouts well (remember i play 8ball so there are choices of potting order to be made), sometimes my execution just lets me down. Amazingly, i play a tad better in competition than in practice. I have a habit of rushing a tad in practice. In competition i take my time and really examine every shot in minute detail.

another weakness of mine and i think this applies to many people is beating people i should beat easily. I'm great at playing really good players. I raise my game and concentrate 200%. When playing players who really should be my beetch, i suffer from lack of focus and slip up missing easy shots. It's not that i usually lose these games, but i usually only just win after a huge dogfight when really it should be a whipping. It's definitely a mental thing. When you play someone who you know if you make one mistake, it will usually be game over, you play much tighter, concentrate more etc etc. When you play someone who you know will give you chance after chance, you take your gas off the pedal

smfsrca
12-02-2002, 08:20 PM
rjh02
Just for your information.
'lesser' is the correct spelling for the word your using. Unless it is a reference to the person paying for the table time, ie. the person leasing the table.

lesser - smaller, inferior, etc.
lessor - one who leases property
Lesser however usually has a negative sense to it.
"The lesser player is the inferior player"
I think weaker is a better term.
Steve

12-02-2002, 09:37 PM
My biggest weakness is that I am left eye dominant but right handed. I have pretty much adapted to it by keeping my left eye directly over the cue, but jump shots and masse are pretty much impossible due to the angle of the cue and my eye being on the wrong side of my head. My second biggest weakness is, of course, blondes.

Mike H
12-02-2002, 11:56 PM
My biggest weakness is my occasional lack of focus at the table....I'll play well using my normal methodical pace, then dog a straight in 9 ball because I one-stroke it. Runner-up: I have nothing in my arsenal that even resembles a jump shot. Want a good laugh? Watch me try to jump a full ball. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

CarolNYC
12-03-2002, 03:58 AM
When you look at the rack, see what your trouble balls are first and try to get rid of them-when you go into a cluster,you dont have to "slam" it,you'd be amazed how the balls just move out with a gentle stroke-you dont want your balls going up table-and then your "keyball"
My weakness is "speed control!"
Good luck!
Carol

silverbullet
12-03-2002, 05:43 AM
i said focus but beneath that is confidence. i can get down on a shot that i have made before, i know i can make and for some reason start doubting myself, then my eyes may wander from the point of aim, i may make last minute adjustments without standing up and dumb stuff like that and my focus is totally out the window and naturally i miss the shot. maybe as i win more it will get better, but i know i am not that bad at pool, not great, but not that bad, it is lack of confidence and i consistently play beneath what i can do.

the other womwn here seem to do so much better. gosh...i hope one day i can be like them...

Laura

12-03-2002, 12:01 PM
If I had to pick one weakness, or at least put it into one word, it would be consistency. Obviously, consistency manifests itself in a variety of ways, but for me it's usually in bad choices, either in shot selection or cueball path. Then it would be blowing those damned "easy" shots. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

smfsrca
12-03-2002, 02:27 PM
My single biggest problem in 9 ball is that I am masterful at running 7 balls from the break. I think I might hold the worlds record.
But, alas, this is not a problem, it is only a symptom. I believe the real culprit is the big F , no, not that F.
I mean FEAR. How we recognize it. How we face it. How we ovecome its negative effects.

12-03-2002, 06:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote smfsrca:</font><hr> My single biggest problem in 9 ball is that I am masterful at running 7 balls from the break. I think I might hold the worlds record.
But, alas, this is not a problem, it is only a symptom. I believe the real culprit is the big F , no, not that F.
I mean FEAR. How we recognize it. How we face it. How we ovecome its negative effects.
<hr /></blockquote>

I think you're definatly onto something there.. Even though I play really well, I fear almost anyone. I've even learned to fear bad players, because they don't even care if they win or lose.. and they have nothing to lose anyhow.

But when I am playing fearlessly, I play very well, and when I take a few chances here and there, alot of times I win.. and a few times I don't. So I'm trying to have an "I don't really care" attitude rather than "I'm afraid of losing" attitude. If that makes ANY sense whatsoever..

Popcorn
12-03-2002, 07:17 PM
I don't think trying to screw with your opponent by altering your own play is ever a good idea. Wait for your turn and play. I used to play a lot of straight pool and you often sat for a half hour waiting for your turn. Learning how to sit back and wait your turn, needs to be learned if you are to be a player. You should not care what the other guy does, just wait for you turn, what else can you do. You can't get mad at someone because you don't like their style of play. That is the way it goes.

phil in sofla
12-03-2002, 10:57 PM
My break varies from good to scratching regularly, to where I have to change my aim point for unknown reasons.

I'm fairly tall, and I tend to stretch too far down table, shooting VERY akwardly when I should be using the bridge.

Occasionally, when I'm down, I lose my aim target, and don't stand up to reset it, and that usually costs me.

I'm normally good for a hopped miscued cue ball on a draw stroke once or twice a long night (5 or 6 hours), which may not be much of a big weakness, per se, but it is highly annoying, and you KNOW it will be at a bad point in the rack/set/match.

If I don't pause at the end of my backswing, my results are highly variable, and I don't remember, or my routine isn't set enough, for me to always accomplish that.

Jumping and left handed play I don't do at all, which I sort of don't consider weaknesses, maybe because out of sight out of mind, and I don't even think of trying them.

Lastly, I'd say I'm a little too Zen about losing or winning, and maybe should decide more emphatically that winning IS a lot better than losing. It IS, right?

heater451
12-04-2002, 11:07 AM
I understand what you mean, but I think more 'fast' shooters are adversely affected by the interruption of their rhythm, and slowing down more than the opponent helps avoid rushing, when its their turn. Screwing with the opponents rhythm is just a side-benefit.

Basically, it's also something of an exercise in patience. As you put it, "Learning how to sit back and wait your turn, needs to be learned if you are to be a player."

Also, the fast(er) player will already have his rhythm off, so slowing down shouldn't hurt. I sometimes think that it also helps to 'reset' that players rhythm somehow--sort of like being able to alter the 'beat', while retaining the same tempo. (If I have that analogy correct--musical folks, jump in.)



===================

Eric.
12-04-2002, 04:28 PM
Basically, it's also something of an exercise in patience. As you put it, "Learning how to sit back and wait your turn, needs to be learned if you are to be a player."

Heater,

I have to agree with you on this one. I've been told to stay within my own pac and ignore what the opponent is doing. Basically, I'll let him pick at fuzz, scatch his head, scratch his Yam Bag-I'll look away, watch another table, etc..and come back to the table with a "where did I leave off" attitude.
Seems to work.

Eric

Popcorn
12-04-2002, 04:58 PM
I am trying to get what you mean by a slow player. Playing 9-ball or 8-ball even with the slowest players you are only away from the table for a few minutes at most. That should not effect your rhythm. Some players are annoying to watch, so don't watch. I think you want to punish the player for playing what is your opinion slow play. You should not care in the least what they do. Play your game and make the most of your turns at the table is the best you can do. Some things can be ridicules like a guy I once played in a tournament that went to the bathroom every few minutes. Once while he was gone, I went next door and got something to eat and didn't come back for 20 minutes. When I came back into the tournament room with my fries and a coke he was going nuts because no one knew where I went. I sat down and told him to go ahead and break. He was so pissed off he never won another game. That situation was kind of extreme but for the most part you just play your game and ignore the other player. Lassiter would sometimes read a newspaper when the other guy was at the table or put on dark glasses and just sit there not seeming to be paying any attention. That was meant to be kind of a shark though.

12-05-2002, 03:41 PM
Speed control and knowledge of how balls react with eachother. I feel I have the knowledge with safety and patterns etc but can't put them to full use. Kicks.
Being able to get used to the conditions quickly. Comebacks. Playing under pressure. <font color="blue"> </font color> <font color="black"> </font color>

Leviathan
12-06-2002, 07:00 PM
Greetings, Phil.

No, I don't think that winning is better than losing. I think that winning and losing are equally unimportant, and that players who are motivated mainly by desire to win don't get much out of the game.

D.M.