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View Full Version : Looking for tip that holds tooth, resists glazing



Leviathan
12-14-2002, 08:45 PM
I live in the boonies nowadays and practice in a crummy room with crummy equipment--dirty, chipped balls, dirty cloth. The Le Pro tips I use lose their tooth and get glazed pretty quickly under these conditions, so I do a lot of picking and sanding and have to replace tips frequently, which is inconvenient. Has anybody out there run across a hard, nonlaminated tip that holds its tooth unusually well and resists glazing in dirty conditions? I doubt it! But if you have, I'd appreciate hearing about it.

Thanks,
D.M.

Chris Cass
12-14-2002, 09:03 PM
Hi Duke,

The Sumo tips will last ya a little longer but still, tips do have to be roughed, now and then. That's the best I can offer. You might miscue every so often too. They're a little harder than LePro. They will mushroom less and will teach you to stay in a quarter radius of the cb. It's takes some time but after you get used to the hardness of the tip. You'll never go back. IMHO

I crush mine in a vice then sand the backs, spray them with clear coat car finish, let dry 24hrs. I like them this way the best. I use them on my playing cue if your wondering. The softer the tip, the better the bite, so I hear?

Good Luck,

C.C.

TonyM
12-14-2002, 09:27 PM
The Water Buffalo tips (marketed under the brand name WB) hold chalk well and are pretty firm. The brown ones are the ones you want (not black!). They vary a bit, so you might want to get a few. Meuller's sell them in smaller quantities IIRC.

Also, Triangles might hold chalk a bit better than Lepros.

Tony

Troy
12-14-2002, 10:00 PM
Triangle and Water Buffalo (WB) are both harder than Le Pro.
I have both in stock.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> I live in the boonies nowadays and practice in a crummy room with crummy equipment--dirty, chipped balls, dirty cloth. The Le Pro tips I use lose their tooth and get glazed pretty quickly under these conditions, so I do a lot of picking and sanding and have to replace tips frequently, which is inconvenient. Has anybody out there run across a hard, nonlaminated tip that holds its tooth unusually well and resists glazing in dirty conditions? I doubt it! But if you have, I'd appreciate hearing about it.

Thanks,
D.M. <hr /></blockquote>

silverbullet
12-14-2002, 10:29 PM
I have used the following tips. I like all of them. they all seem to hold chalk well for me and not miscue, but then I always bring my own chalk which is usually better than what is at the ph.

moori soft
talisman soft
moori medium
sumo water buffalo (think is soft or med,came from blackheart)

i am not so sure about the difference in tips but think there are many good ones out there.

blu

stickman
12-15-2002, 12:11 AM
I also like the Sumo WB tip. It does require scuffing on a very infrequent basis, but nothing like the picking and scuffing I required with the LePros. If you change your mind about layered tips, the Talisman WB is great. The only tool you need is a cube of chalk.

SpiderMan
12-16-2002, 09:16 AM
Triangle is same approximate hardness as LePro but seems to take chalk a lot better. The leather has coarser fibers. All but the the softest talismans seem to get slick quickly. I once used a moori medium that took chalk pretty well, but no better than a triangle.

SpiderMan

Wally_in_Cincy
12-16-2002, 10:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Triangle is same approximate hardness as LePro but seems to take chalk a lot better. The leather has coarser fibers. All but the the softest talismans seem to get slick quickly. I once used a moori medium that took chalk pretty well, but no better than a triangle.

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

As you know I recently bought a new McDermott. According to their website they use Triangle tips. Of the 2 shafts, one tip is noticeably harder than the other. The softer one hits like the LePro I usually use. And it definitely requires much less scuffing than the LePro.

Spidey, where do you find more hardness inconsistency, LePro or Triangle?

Fred Agnir
12-16-2002, 11:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> [Spidey, where do you find more hardness inconsistency, LePro or Triangle? <hr /></blockquote>
I switched to Triangle several years ago because I found them more consistent than the LePros. I think the average hardness was about the same, but the range was tighter for the Triangles.

However, the last few Triangles I got... sucked. Very disappointed. I also notice that they aren't blue like they used to be. That signals to me that another manufacturing process or another manufacturer is making them.

Anyone got an info?

Fred

Rod
12-16-2002, 12:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> [Spidey, where do you find more hardness inconsistency, LePro or Triangle? <hr /></blockquote>
I switched to Triangle several years ago because I found them more consistent than the LePros. I think the average hardness was about the same, but the range was tighter for the Triangles.

However, the last few Triangles I got... sucked. Very disappointed. I also notice that they aren't blue like they used to be. That signals to me that another manufacturing process or another manufacturer is making them.

Anyone got an info?

Fred <hr /></blockquote>


I don't have a clue but, if you find tips you like buy a box of them. It seems this happens all to often, a change in the mixture, whether it be the same mfg or not. Pool isn't the only area affected.
I always felt triangle was more consistant than LePro.

SpiderMan
12-16-2002, 01:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Triangle is same approximate hardness as LePro but seems to take chalk a lot better. The leather has coarser fibers. All but the the softest talismans seem to get slick quickly. I once used a moori medium that took chalk pretty well, but no better than a triangle.

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

As you know I recently bought a new McDermott. According to their website they use Triangle tips. Of the 2 shafts, one tip is noticeably harder than the other. The softer one hits like the LePro I usually use. And it definitely requires much less scuffing than the LePro.

Spidey, where do you find more hardness inconsistency, LePro or Triangle? <hr /></blockquote>

Wally,

I also have a new McDermott, but I could swear that the tips that came on it are not Triangles. Although they are fairly heavily polished, I'd say that mine are LePros on all three shafts.

Don't know if I mentioned sending my cue back for warranty because of the messed-up tapers on the shafts. But, before sending it in, I noticed that one of the tips was very "fuzzy" on top, as if it had been over-roughed with a file. The three new shafts that they sent back all have what appears to be identical LePro tips.

Regarding hardness consistency, I don't think I could make a call between the two. I can say that I prefer the Triangle for it's chalking characteristics, though. Also, I know of two cases in the past year where a player has had a "chunk" come off the edge of a LePro. Both of these guys are players who shoot fairly hard. I steered both of them to Triangles, so we'll wait and see about the durability.

Fred Agnir mentioned color in the post below yours, but I personally have never seen a blue Triangle. All of mine have a light brown color, darker on the sides and bottom.

SpiderMan

Wally_in_Cincy
12-16-2002, 01:49 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr>

I also have a new McDermott, but I could swear that the tips that came on it are not Triangles. Although they are fairly heavily polished, I'd say that mine are LePros on all three shafts.
<hr /></blockquote>

I thought they looked and hit like lepro too, but I don't really know tips like you do. They don't seem to glaze like the lepro.

McDermott's website, where they specify the type of tip, always specifies Triangle.

http://www.mcdermottcue.com/PAGES/McDCues/2001%20Series/M13B.htm

They do not specify a tip for the Prestige but I'm assuming it's the same.

http://shop.store.yahoo.com/mcdermottcue/prestigeseries.html

Fred Agnir
12-16-2002, 02:01 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Fred Agnir mentioned color in the post below yours, but I personally have never seen a blue Triangle. All of mine have a light brown color, darker on the sides and bottom.<hr /></blockquote>
Yup, up until this last group that I bought, all Triangles that I've ever had, had a blue tinge. Sherm Adamson says that Triangles are (were?) treated with both the tannic process which turns them brown (like LePros) and the blue Chromium process which turns them blue (like Elk Master).

The fact that they are no longer bluish tells me even more that the process has changed and that these Triangles are not the Triangles that I've grown to love. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Fred

TomBrooklyn
12-16-2002, 03:57 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr>the last few Triangles I got... sucked. Very disappointed. <hr /></blockquote>Fred, what was wrong with them?

Fred Agnir
12-16-2002, 04:01 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TomBrooklyn:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr>the last few Triangles I got... sucked. Very disappointed. <hr /></blockquote>Fred, what was wrong with them? <hr /></blockquote>
They didn't feel firm. The one I put on kept mushrooming for longer than what I'm used to with Triangles. In the past, the Triangles I've put on mushroomed a little initially, and then they'd keep shape until I removed it. This one, I kept having to trim it, trim it, trim it. It's been holding firm now that it's broken in (compressed), but I think it was much longer than I care.

Fred