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View Full Version : Going for the Jugular



silverbullet
12-15-2002, 08:43 AM
I have noticed in every sport, that sometimes there are upsets. Like there are two basketball teams. One plays a fast paced game. The other, if they are able to slow the fast team down, and force the better team into playing the weaker player's game, then an upset can occur.

I think this was a factor in my match the other night.The man I played is, according to others, a very good player, and did not play 'his game'. According to others who know him, I was able to keep him frustrated the entire match.

In the first match, i broke and left a cluster in the middle. He got frustrated, trying to break out his balls and dealing with my safes. Also, I can play decent shape on balls at one end of the table or going long and coming back down. This man is actually better all around at shape (3 rails etc). He missed a couple of long right cuts, so I started running him up and down the table and he kept missing those shots because that is his weakness.

I think that even though it was very close, two things in that match were factors. 1) I know my strengths and weaknesses and played to my strengths. When I got in a long 90% cut in the corner, I think this really messed with his head and confidence 2)I was lucky in that I picked up on his weakness right away (long cuts) and was able to go for the jugular and I showed no mercy(although we were friendly after the match).

My shot making skills have improved and my shape has improved some, although I still need practice on both.

But I do not delude myself into thinking that just because I beat a top four, that that makes me one. It is my opinion that he is more proficient in the physical game, but I had just enough physical skills to beat him in the mental game.

I am wondering if any of you have had similar experience where you were able to beat a better player ( better pool skill wize). I am also wondering what sucess you have had in detecting your opponent's weakness right away and being able to 'go for the jugular' and force them to play 'your game' or if you have had more success by playing to your strengths and knowing your weaknesses,and avoiding them while being able to not let the other player what your weaknesses are.

Bowing in humility and wanting insight from experienced players.

blu

Tom_In_Cincy
12-15-2002, 09:03 AM
SilverBullet

Sizing up your opponent is a double sided blade. If you can identify their strengths and weaknesses and adjust your game to have a chance at wining, that is great.

If it were as easy as it sounds, maybe there would be more upsets.. but that is not the case. Game plans for even the most professional of teams or individuals cannot overcome desire and skill in most cases. The has to be a letdown of the better player/team for an upset to occur. Good teams/players don't usually have these letdowns, but when they do, if their opponent can capitalize, there is a chance for an unset.

Remember, when you do leave a long cut shot for a player that you know that has trouble with these kinds of shots, you also leave them an opportunity to make the shot and become more confident on the next one. You let them become a stronger player.

12-15-2002, 09:14 AM
Word has it that she talks a better game than what she puts on the table. We've all heard the saying 'Armchair Quarterback'

silverbullet
12-15-2002, 09:26 AM
beleive what you wish. nobody can prove anything on the internet.

"For those without faith no proof is possible,
For those with faith, no proof is necessary"

"Cynics will always be with us"

"If you don't have something pertinent and valuable to the topic at hand, then shaddup".

"It matters not what you believe, but what you can contribute".

blu

silverbullet
12-15-2002, 10:04 AM
Tom,

Thanks as always for your excellent insight as a true player and lover of the game of pool.

In truth, I have a long way to go and I know it. I believe that if I keep playing APA and working hard, my sl will go up. To a 3 first, then a four.A friend told me that if I go to a sl3 in 4 months and an sl4 in 6-12 months, then that would be excellent progress. After the last win, that puts me at a 50% w/l record, which is not a bad stat to begin the next session with.

Laura

Popcorn
12-15-2002, 10:12 AM
In a tournament, the winner of a given match is more determined by the rolls and how a player plays right off the bat. The match is to short for analyzing your opponent much or having a game plan. You play just full bore right out of the box, that is how you win. You may beat a world champion if you catch him asleep in a short match. That is why although I like tournaments, they don't prove who is the best, at least the way tournaments are most often played, you know double elimination. If you look at a tournament chart after the tournament you will see a player win a match 11 to 3 only to lose their next match 11 to 2. The levels of play don't vary enough to produce that kind of number. In fact they could play the match over and have completely opposite results, so you can see, it did not prove anything about the players skills. So what I am saying is, in a short match, (in league play it is just one game, it can't get any shorter then that) be ready and hit them with 100% right out of the box, you may, if you can play at all, beat anybody. In a long match with no time limit such as gambling matches, all the analysis in the world won't help. The better player will always win. I guess what I am saying is don't pay too much attention to your opponents game, there is no time for a tactual plan. Worry about your game and get the balls off the table. Of course I am referring to 9-ball and 8-ball not one pocket.

12-15-2002, 10:44 AM

cheesemouse
12-15-2002, 10:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silverbullet:</font><hr> beleive what you wish. nobody can prove anything on the internet.

"For those without faith no proof is possible,
For those with faith, no proof is necessary"

"Cynics will always be with us"

"If you don't have something pertinent and valuable to the topic at hand, then shaddup".

"It matters not what you believe, but what you can contribute".

blu

<hr /></blockquote>

All right Blu!!! Out comes your name given nature. Now, that is 'wolfing'. Welcome to the club... /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

TomBrooklyn
12-15-2002, 07:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote A.L.F:</font><hr> Word has it that she talks a better game than what she puts on the table.<hr /></blockquote>I heard that she plays way, way, better than she lets on, and she's looking to set up some action. Sorry for the knock bw, but I couldn't let you get away with it here.
-T

12-15-2002, 08:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr>Remember, when you do leave a long cut shot for a player that you know that has trouble with these kinds of shots, you also leave them an opportunity to make the shot and become more confident on the next one. You let them become a stronger player.
<hr /></blockquote>

funny you mention that, playing 1-p my friend likes to leave me those long-crooked-fat-juicys 'cause he knows i love them and sometimes can't make them. but then, sometimes i can.

i'm always suspicious when someone says they can set their game to the other guys weaknesses in the first rack or two. in the real world, that just doesn't happen. almost everyone i play is capable of running out anything from anywhere. it's just a question of whether they will do it this time.

dan...gotta be my turn soon.

Popcorn
12-15-2002, 11:03 PM
It is funny, in one pocket you can sometimes make such a good move, it causes you to lose the game. I get a little nervous when I see a guy about to take a desperate shot. They many times make them.

Fred Agnir
12-16-2002, 08:05 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silverbullet:</font><hr> After the last win, that puts me at a 50% w/l record, which is not a bad stat to begin the next session with.<hr /></blockquote>
You'll be an SL-3 the next playing week.

Fred

snipershot
01-01-2003, 03:20 AM
If you can identify your opponents strenghts and weaknesses I feel it is a key to improving your chances of winning, especially against a superior player.

What I feel is equally important if not more important is to disguise your own weaknesses, your opponent is going to try and find your weak points so that they can attack them, if you are playing a superior player and they can't identify your faults this should level the playing field alot more.

Chris Cass
01-01-2003, 06:14 AM
Hi Snipershot,

Welcome to the board. I didn't recognize the name so I thought I'd mention this first.

I understand what your point is but I think an opponents weaknesses come into play on the push out. The rest is easy, you either safe them or your out. IMHO

Regards,

C.C.~~good to see new people....

TomBrooklyn
01-01-2003, 07:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silverbullet:</font><hr>In the first [game], i broke and left a cluster in the middle. He got frustrated, trying to break out his balls and dealing with my safes. He missed a couple of long right cuts, so I started running him up and down the table and he kept missing those shots because that is his weakness.<hr /></blockquote>Shooting long shots and breaking out clusters are not weaknesses particular to that player. Everyone finds long shots more difficult than short ones and breaking out clusters is a challenge for all players.

As far as leaving your opponent with a cluster on the break, did you think you could do that intentionally on subsequent breaks? If you were to soft break purposely to leave clusters you would also be less likely to make a ball, increasing the chances that your opponent would have the opportunity to shoot in the first ball, which he would probably select based on leaving you with the most clusters or worse layout.

It may be that he has more trouble with cuts to the right than the left; but were you actually able to determine that in the course of your first game?

What is more likely that you found was that your opponent gets frustrated easily. How easily an opponent gets frustrated certainly does vary between players. I doubt if you will ever find any opponent that you would rather leave with a short shot than a long one however.

TomBrooklyn
01-01-2003, 08:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silverbullet:</font><hr>My shot making skills and shape have improved, although I still need practice on both.<hr /></blockquote>Really? Thats a fabulous insight. Hey everybody, if you want to improve your shotmaking and shape skills, practice them!
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silverbullet:</font><hr>But I do not delude myself into thinking that just because I beat a top four, that that makes me one. <hr /></blockquote>That would be a delusion, seeing as he gave you two games in a race to four. Oh, your too much. Lol.

silverbullet
01-01-2003, 08:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TomBrooklyn:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote silverbullet:</font><hr>In the first [game], i broke and left a cluster in the middle. He got frustrated, trying to break out his balls and dealing with my safes. He missed a couple of long right cuts, so I started running him up and down the table and he kept missing those shots because that is his weakness.<hr /></blockquote>Shooting long shots and breaking out clusters are not weaknesses particular to that player. Everyone finds long shots more difficult than short ones and breaking out clusters is a challenge for all players.

As far as leaving your opponent with a cluster on the break, did you think you could do that intentionally on subsequent breaks? If you were to soft break purposely to leave clusters you would also be less likely to make a ball, increasing the chances that your opponent would have the opportunity to shoot in the first ball, which he would probably select based on leaving you with the most clusters or worse layout.

It may be that he has more trouble with cuts to the right than the left; but were you actually able to determine that in the course of your first game?

What is more likely that you found was that your opponent gets frustrated easily. How easily an opponent gets frustrated certainly does vary between players. I doubt if you will ever find any opponent that you would rather leave with a short shot than a long one however.
<hr /></blockquote>

Leaving a cluster on the break. I got the flip so this was the first of two breaks I had in the match.I did not break good on this break or the racking wasnt tight and I failed to notice. My second break was a lot better. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I like long shots just fine. Also, I pracice cut shots to both sides. WW has more trouble relative to his sl than I do with this than I do relative to my sl. This appears to be related to my ability to be both eyed instead of being strongly dominant with one eye over the other. At least that is his theory why he cuts better one way than the other.

There is also, imo, a difference between being so weak in an area that you cannot do it at all, and between having it as a relative weakness. My opponent missed 100% long cut shots, but was fine on long straight in shots. Until recently, I missed almost all cuts to the side pockets and was going long to avoid the side pocket shot, because I knew I could make it long most of the time. At some point, I decided this was ridiculous and worked on side pocket shots. It is still a weakness relative to other shots but not as much of a handicap as it was.

thanks.

bw