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Chris Cass
12-17-2002, 01:51 AM
Hi Everyone,

Very interesting post by Pogue. Brought up thoughts of the gaining or losing ones confidence. Confidence in ones play comes from practicing. Making balls consistantly and striking the cb with precise accuracy. To repeat these results in a manor one can always count on.

Flaws in mechanics however small, can be directly affecting ones confidence and consistacy. One can master bad mechanics and there really is no one way, to do things. There are many. Grip, Stance, Bridge, Warm up strokes, Shot timing, Eye movements, breath counts and the Follow-through.

What really matters is the final stroke. They say once the cue tip leaves the ball, the amount of Follow-Through me's diddly. This is a misconstrude, as they're talking about the effect that Follow-though has on whitey. Which brings me to the question of Stroke.

Many see the Stroke as being Follow-through and also the sight of cb reaction. Stroke is also a mental feeling obtained through Follow-through as I believe. It's one factor that breeds confidence. Also gaining feel for the equipment your playing on.

Now Machanics, has all to do with the hit on the final stroke to deliver the the tip with precision. We know also to reley on striking the cb at the maximum effectiveness requires we strike the cb at the most level cue position for ctr ball. However we still have to elevate the end of the cue, due to the table. Mentally adjusting for variables in the games imperfections.

We minumize this as much as possible. I know when my cue tip is at 1/4 in. away from the cb and my elbow is at 90 that means to me I'm striking the cb at the most level position I can obtain. This doesn't mean I couldn't start with my cue tip 3 inches away and driving my hit on the down stroke or follow-through that it's wrong. One can adjust for these things too.

What it means to me as far as I shoot is, eliminating all variables as much as possible. To get a consistant feeling through Follow-through. Hitting consistanly in the precise point of the cb. It serves as the beginning of all consistancy. Therefore, experiencing confidence and this can be displayed.

If my mechanics are off and I do mean all the ones I listed above. I will lose my confidence. During a match one may miss and it's all too important to dig down deep in oneself to hang in there and regain consistancy, in hitting the cb. It is confidence in your practice that will, pull you out. It's a consistant pre-shot routine and a desire to obtain the goal of consitancy. This I feel will breed and aire confidence. IMHO This is also the reason we need qualified instructors to aid in our goal. You may obtain them without qualified instruction but you may also lose valuable time. Instruction can also breed desire to achieve confidence. Curious to see what others think?

Regards,

C.C.~~thoughts.......

dddd
12-17-2002, 03:51 AM
chris

i often have this conversation with myself.
confidence, self-assurance.

i have two sides of my temperment.
when i play with confidence and when i play with that questioning poping up in my mind.

but there is the time when all in quiet in my head and my pre-shot routine is what i do. planning and then shooting. when i do this i shoot well.
then there comes a time when those voices in my head scream at me as i am attempting to shoot.

there seems to be a real connection to many facets of preperation in how my game will unfold on any given day.

there is a possible connection to this particular thing i do.

i have someone whom i play with and have give me lessons. we
get together a couple times a month and spend a couple hours shooting shots, talking and general thoughts on the game, both mental and phyiscal. we also set up shots and discuss the methods and reasons for how we will approach them.
this time seems to provide real direction and focus that transmits directly into better play. i dont have enough hard written evidence of that but my play and feelings are much elevated after taking some time out to take that "lesson", after spending some time with him i do not remember that voice, nor do i hear that voice.
he provides that measure i need at this time.
after this "lesson" i know i am dangerous and a good player!
i feel excited and desire to play more.

practice is vital to me as well, without enough table time i feel anxious and edgy. the practice gives me the phyiscal ability and the repeatability of shots to learn


without these things then my mechanics begin to detoriate and i begin to question and then everything will eventually break down if nothing is done to rebuild my confidence and practice time

dennis

CarolNYC
12-17-2002, 04:46 AM
Hey Chris,
Oh, I like this post and your absolutely correct about confidence coming from experience!:)
Confidence is a sense of certainty and willing to put yourself on the line-the opposite would be to experience fear-so always act on faith in yourself!
Confidence,competence and security go together-always feel certain and KNOW what is going to happen in advance of its occurrence-
Carol~could go on forever on this one-thinks of Chris and family always!:):)

bigbro6060
12-17-2002, 06:01 PM
Confidence is definitely about knowing that you can execute a shot and yes practice and matchplay will help increase your confidence. There will always be days where nothing is going right and your confidence plummets and you start second guessing yourself with even the easiest of shots.

randyg
12-17-2002, 06:08 PM
Great Post....randyg

Tom_In_Cincy
12-17-2002, 06:21 PM
Chris,

While I have never been considered a Champion pool player, by any measure of the word "Champion" I do "win" my fair share of matches. I also have my share of losses.

My confidence is like my game. Sometimes my game is on.. and so is the confidence. But, regardless of my confidence, I manage to squeak out a win, when my confidence says I shouldn't even be at the pool hall.. or maybe just watching, instead of playing.

Its funny, I do beleive that confidence can mentally help you play better, but I would rather just accept my performance and trust that what I can do, and know, will make me win more often than lose.

My biggest problem is table time. I never get the time I need to practice or compete. I have to call and make reservations with players in advance. Weekends are OK.. but work and family (especially this time of year) take priority.

But, back to the Arrogant/Confident subject. I am of the opinion that both can be a negative to a Pro Champion. I think its the calm, no opinion, no emotions, no FEAR, total focus and concentration, with out those ego distractions that get the "Champion" that moniker

HOWARD
12-17-2002, 07:27 PM
Chris,

Confidence - tough to capture right when you need it. But I have found it on occasion.

For example, I use to play in a friendly ring came - a couple of bucks - four or five sticks. A lot of woofing, sharking - we all knew each others - so it was not a break of sportmanship. We were changing the bet and I held the table on the last rack of the old bet, and I had come down to the eight and nine ball. after the eight my position on the nine was tight - a couple of inches away from the ob half table to the corner a cut - they are hard to judge when your close like that. In any case all the players started sharking woofing as I am lining up this nine. Something funny happen inside of me - I could hear the chatter but inside my
self - it was dead quiet with full confidence that the nine would find the center of the pocket and I did find the center of the corner pocket.
I have been in that state a few times but how I arrive there is mystery to me. But it is a beautiful destination.
Best regards,

Howard

phil in sofla
12-17-2002, 07:36 PM
Confidence comes from repeated and recent success. A recent failure, a miss on your last trip to the table, may or may not harm confidence, but repeated recent failure probably will.

However, considering that even in stroke, slight misses are possible, a miss may not hurt confidence, if it just reminds you to do what you know has given you the recent successes, or to change your shot/safety judgment for that match or that day, whatever.

Confidence that your 'b' game will still be competitive, and that you can still win with it, and that maybe you're still the favorite to win, even not hitting on all your cylinders that day, is the kind of confidence that doesn't change with the weather. If you don't have that, then confidence can be a shot-to-shot variable.

Chris Cass
12-17-2002, 10:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> Chris,


My biggest problem is table time. I never get the time I need to practice or compete. I have to call and make reservations with players in advance. Weekends are OK.. but work and family (especially this time of year) take priority.

But, back to the Arrogant/Confident subject. I am of the opinion that both can be a negative to a Pro Champion. I think its the calm, no opinion, no emotions, no FEAR, total focus and concentration, with out those ego distractions that get the "Champion" that moniker <hr /></blockquote>

Hi Tom,

When it's hard to get practice in and scheduling becomes necessary then, also try to schedule different games. I know you love 1p and I do too. I try to set up a bank game for the day. Then, next time 1p. I find that mixing all the elements in 1p can and will be very effective in building ones game overall. JAT

Champions, display the qualities you've mentioned through timing of their shots. They'll put all their emotions in check and play the table like a violin. The emotions come in from letting their adrenlin control them. A true champion has to control not only the table but themselves. Somewhat like a poker player that has the nut hand. He can't make money unless he displays no emotions, bets the proper amount to hold the others in and wisely plays his hand. The emotions usually come out afterwards. When, it's over. IMHO

You Tom, are a very smart and studious player of the sport. I see your observant and know quite a bit about pool and how it should be played, displayed and all in proper ways. Your a class player and I'd enjoy being scheduled with you anytime. Thanks for your thoughts.

Regards,

C.C.~~ /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Chris Cass
12-17-2002, 10:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> confidence can be a shot-to-shot variable.

<hr /></blockquote>

Hi Phil,

This is interesting. You talk of running on less than all eight cylinders. Yes, these days happen so one has to reley on the basics. The basics will rebuild that confidence over time and may even be that particular night of play.

By Basics I mean, remembering all of your practice sessions. Remembering the odds and percentages of making the shots. When, your in total gear and playing your best the shot percentages change drastically. Especially when in the Zone. They become higher.

So, on the day the Zone is absent and it's fuzzy? Reley on you true shot percentages and that will carry you through along with your pre-shot routine. Who knows? Maybe, you'll find the Zone and capitalize on it and find all your cylinders firing once again. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Phil, by no means is this a put down to you or others of your appearent skill level. I know your an intelligent man as I've found out from Kato some time ago. If this helps I'd be all to eager to offer this advice.

Most "B" players I've ever played had worked hard to obtain their skills but the things I've noticed that's common were. Shot timing, rhythm, and percentage shots. They 've seemed to try to do too much with the cb and find themselves trapped. Also, some so eager to race around the table to the next shot. The ones that do excel are the ones that relax and use their skills to the fullest. Not every rack needs to be ran, not every bank needs to be banked. Sometimes saftey and clear mapping can be twice as deadly. JMHO

I know from Kato your IQ is extremely high and you don't belittle people with less. Your a true gentleman. For this I go out on a limb not to insult but to help, if I can.

Regards,

C.C.

Chris Cass
12-17-2002, 10:46 PM
Who Loves you?

Me,

C.C.

CarolNYC
12-18-2002, 04:21 AM
Who loves you back,forever!
ME!
Carol:):)

CarolNYC
12-18-2002, 04:29 AM
Absolutely BB6060,
This is a very good point-right there you KNEW what your doing wrong"second guessing yourself" now you correct it-step back,reaccess,commit to it then execute-not many people realize what they are doing wrong and once you do, it can be corrected- this is why it is a great value to have someone watching(which of course we know cant always happen)-but if you can figure it out yourself-thats the best!Thinking too long is a bad thing-either you see it or you dont-ya know what I mean-like the PATTERNS,UGH, of straight pool! ha ha ha
Have a great day!
Carol:)

cheesemouse
12-18-2002, 06:32 AM
Chris,
Confidence also is reflected in the way you treat people while playing the game. What you think of yourself is reflected in the way you treat others. A very effective way to raise your own level of confidence is by acting positively toward the people around you.
Rudeness toward others, whether intentional or not, is a sure sign of a lack of confidence. When you have no respect or consideration for others, it's difficult to have much confidence in yourself.

Ironically, one of the worst things you can do for yourself is to think only of yourself. The more genuine respect, consideration and courtesy you express toward those around you, the more your own confidence will grow.

If someone is rude to you, make every effort to be sincerely pleasant and courteous in return. Just because someone else is allowing rudeness to drain away their own energy, doesn't mean you must do the same.

Have the confidence to be courteous, and the confidence to act with genuine respect toward others. Your positive attitude and positive actions will empower you with even more confidence and energy.

We not only have the problem of building physical confidence in our game but we have to be good people.

Chris Cass
12-18-2002, 09:27 AM
Tap, Tap, Tap, spoken like the true warrior and class player you are Cheese.

Regards,

C.C.

cheesemouse
12-18-2002, 10:25 AM
Chris,
Thanks for the complement but some of those thoughts were written by someone else and I couldn't remember their name so I parapharsed but it doesn't make it anyless true...the real class act here on ccb is Wendy(9-ballgirl), which she recently demonstrated by returning a strangers wallet she found in taxi.

Tom_In_Cincy
12-18-2002, 02:39 PM
Chris,

Awww shucks.. thanks for the kind words.. coming from you they mean alot.

Over 37 years of playing.. I can't help but learn something.. I can't always put what I learn to use, but I like sharing.. just because in the 60s and 70s no one shared... no books, videos, qualified instructors, or poolhall mentors, to speak of.. that's all different now.. and I hope it helps the game grow in a more positive direction.

silverbullet
12-18-2002, 07:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> confidence can be a shot-to-shot variable.

<hr /></blockquote>


Hi Phil,

This is interesting. You talk of running on less than all eight cylinders. Yes, these days happen so one has to reley on the basics. The basics will rebuild that confidence over time and may even be that particular night of play.

By Basics I mean, remembering all of your practice sessions. Remembering the odds and percentages of making the shots. When, your in total gear and playing your best the shot percentages change drastically. Especially when in the Zone. They become higher.

So, on the day the Zone is absent and it's fuzzy? Reley on you true shot percentages and that will carry you through along with your pre-shot routine. Who knows? Maybe, you'll find the Zone and capitalize on it and find all your cylinders firing once again. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Phil, by no means is this a put down to you or others of your appearent skill level. I know your an intelligent man as I've found out from Kato some time ago. If this helps I'd be all to eager to offer this advice.

Most "B" players I've ever played had worked hard to obtain their skills but the things I've noticed that's common were. Shot timing, rhythm, and percentage shots. They 've seemed to try to do too much with the cb and find themselves trapped. Also, some so eager to race around the table to the next shot. The ones that do excel are the ones that relax and use their skills to the fullest. Not every rack needs to be ran, not every bank needs to be banked. Sometimes saftey and clear mapping can be twice as deadly. JMHO

I know from Kato your IQ is extremely high and you don't belittle people with less. Your a true gentleman. For this I go out on a limb not to insult but to help, if I can.

Regards,

C.C. <hr /></blockquote>


Glad to see what you say Chris about b players. What is funny is observing the inconsistencies . In my limited experience i see less ups and downs and more 'smarts' with better players.

I have a friend at the ph who was a strong 4 at the beginning of the session. every time i came to apa he was there early, playing whoever he could and learning. i did not get to go to league for a month due to work and when i saw him before the playoffs last week, i was astounded by how much he has improved. ww thinks he is a 5 now. dont know, just know he seems determined to get better, puts in time and keeps learning.

it was interesting what you said chris about certain players running the cb all over the table then getting stuck. i know i cant do that and 'assumed' the players who could do 3 rails for shape were better 'shape shifters' than me. &lt;G&gt;

i have seen 7s play great and seen the same ones play like 3s. it seems this guy i referred to may ultimately be a better player. it should be interesting to see where his 'dogged' determination has taken him in a year or two.

blu

Chris Cass
12-18-2002, 08:38 PM
Hi BW,

I see your point but just to mention I think a "B" player in the APA would be like equal to a SL9 or something? They all are capable of running from anywhere but drop the chalupa every so often.

JAT,

C.C.~~hope all is well with you and the things in your life.