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View Full Version : Smoothness of shafts after sandpapering



Buckster_uk
12-22-2002, 11:52 AM
I sandpaper my cue rarely with very fine sandpaper, but when it is done, the shaft feels great obviously and slides real well through my looped bridge. I am worrying that if I sand it too much all the time, the shaft will become smaller, is there a way to get the sort of feel and texture of a sandpapered shaft without actually sandpapering it? Lol, sounds stupid, but the feeling is great.

With very fine sandpaper, would it be ok to just lightly sandpaper it every so often?

Cueless Joey
12-22-2002, 11:55 AM
Get a hold of Dr. Z shaft pack. Go to www.cuesforless.com. (http://www.cuesforless.com.)

Barbara
12-22-2002, 11:59 AM
I use Q-Wiz on my shafts. One side smooths and the other side burnishes. Plus, it's washable so it won't get gummed up with chalk and oils. It is NOT sandpaper and works just as good.

It's made by Pro-Produx out of Naples, FL.

Barbara

dddd
12-22-2002, 09:07 PM
dont sand at all if possible
only sand if on lathe to prevent narrowing shafts in the middle
only sand as last resort material cannot be recovered

12-23-2002, 01:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Buckster_uk:</font><hr> I sandpaper my cue rarely with very fine sandpaper, but when it is done, the shaft feels great obviously and slides real well through my looped bridge. I am worrying that if I sand it too much all the time, the shaft will become smaller, is there a way to get the sort of feel and texture of a sandpapered shaft without actually sandpapering it? Lol, sounds stupid, but the feeling is great.

With very fine sandpaper, would it be ok to just lightly sandpaper it every so often? <hr /></blockquote>

look at the sandpaper. if you see very much wood on it then use something finer.

generally, you can get that smooth shaft feeling by just washing your hands and the shaft with clear water and maybe a very little soap, hand or dish type. right now, i've got my main playing shaft soaking to bring up some dings. i'll dry it out, burnish it with leather and maybe use some wet 600 grit paper to finish it. carnuba wax is good too.

dan

CarolNYC
12-23-2002, 02:23 AM
Barb,
Q-whiz is the deal-hard to find-endorsed by Steve Mizerak-fax#941-775-0249!:)
Carol

silverbullet
12-23-2002, 04:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote CarolNYC:</font><hr> Barb,
Q-whiz is the deal-hard to find-endorsed by Steve Mizerak-fax#941-775-0249!:)
Carol <hr /></blockquote>

Blackheart sent me one with the cue I bought from him, so perhaps he has a stock of them.

blu

Paul_Mon
12-23-2002, 09:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> I use Q-Wiz on my shafts. One side smooths and the other side burnishes. Plus, it's washable so it won't get gummed up with chalk and oils. It is NOT sandpaper and works just as good. It's made by Pro-Produx out of Naples, FL.

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>


Barbara,
I was part of the test group that helped in developing the Q-wiz and their other product Pro-Glide. They sent me two different pads to evaluate and send feedback on. I agree that the Q-wiz does a good job but it is abrasive and acts just like any sandpaper in that regard. It will remove material from your shaft and ferrule. I've have also tried "Q Slick" and "Sterlings" cleaner. Neither would get my endorsement. Acetone, denatured alcohol or 90% isopropol alcohol will clean any shaft. It may not clean all ferrules. After cleaning the shaft I burnish with leather and a piece of waxed paper. I try not to use abrasives of any kind on my shafts.

Happy Holidays...........Paul Mon

TonyM
12-23-2002, 02:16 PM
First-off you have to think for a minute just why are you using sandpaper in the first place? Is it because the shaft gets rough and bumpy (not likely) or because it gets sticky and draggy?

If it's the latter (as is often the case) then you have to understand why this happens. Hand oils and chalk and dirt residue build up on the surface of your hands, and gets transferred to the shaft surface. Over time your hand/shaft coefficient of friction becomes high, and you get that sticky feeling.

Sandpaper removes a bit of the surface of the shaft, and in doing so removes some of that dirt and oil build up that is causing the stickiness.

So two solutions other than the sandpaper are immediately apparent:

1) prevent the build-up of dirt and oil in the first place. One way is by wearing a glove. If that's not your style, then more frequent hand washings helps tremendously. Then wipe the shaft down with a damp paper towel, and burnish (rub firmly) with a dry paper towel. This keeps the build-up to a minimum.

2) Remove the dirt and oil with a solvent. Ordinary rubbing alcohol does a great job of removing the build-up of hand oils. Just wipe the shaft down with a paper towel moistened with rubbing alcohol, and then burnish with a dry paper towel. You will be amazed at how much dirt will be left behind on the paper towel.

Another good mild solvent is Lighter Fluid. I use the Ronsonol brand. It also does a good job of cleaning, and seems to leave a nice burnished shine.

I keep a small squirt bottle of lens cleaner solution in my cue case. I use it to clean my glasses before playing, but it is also a good mild solvent that can easily remove the hand oils from your shaft.

The only time that I use sandpaper on a shaft, is to either remove the finish (I prefer bare wood with no sealer, it resists getting sticky better than a finish will) or to smooth out raised grain after I have removed dents or dings by steaming, or if I have done a deep clean using Old Dutch Cleanser (or Comet).

Otherwise, there is just no reason to use sandpaper.

The solvent can remove the hand oils and restore that "just sanded" feel, without removing any wood.

Cheers!

Tony