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View Full Version : Use of a WRIST SNAP on the Break



bigbro6060
12-25-2002, 08:48 PM
Does anyone here use a sharp wrist snap on their break ?

I've been playing around with the wrist snap on the break and am amazed at how much more effortless power i get.

Shouldn't surprise me. The wrist snap is the source of power for the tennis serve, the baseball pitch and many other techniques in sport. The fact i've played a lot of tennis may have helped me adapt the wrist snap to my pool break .

thoughts on the wrist snap on the break ?

Mike H
12-26-2002, 08:33 AM
I think it's important to snap your wrist to achieve optimum power, unless you're soft breaking of course. I try to keep my entire body as loose as possible (without losing control or power) when taking my warmup strokes on the break. The only prob I ever have is that when I really let it all out, whitey's all over the place. Still, using a nice, long follow-through and good technique (loose wrist, body, etc.), you should be able to crush the rack and control the CB routinely.

silverbullet
12-26-2002, 08:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bigbro6060:</font><hr> Does anyone here use a sharp wrist snap on their break ?

I've been playing around with the wrist snap on the break and am amazed at how much more effortless power i get.

Shouldn't surprise me. The wrist snap is the source of power for the tennis serve, the baseball pitch and many other techniques in sport. The fact i've played a lot of tennis may have helped me adapt the wrist snap to my pool break .

thoughts on the wrist snap on the break ? <hr /></blockquote>

Gosh, I would not trust my wrist. I think, if I have learned correctly, that the power is supposed to come from the cue . If a person has a perfect stroke, I think that they can do this, but for people like me, I think it would hurt more than help because it increases the probability of inaccuracy. As I get better, using the correct stroke and a gentle shifting of weight at the hit, I can now split the rack apart and ocasionally pot a ball. I am hitting medium (not soft) speed.

just my inexperienced opinion
bw

Kato
12-26-2002, 08:51 AM
I'll toss my .02 because I'm currently flirting with using more wrist in my break. I've been watching Bustamante break and while I don't profess to have Busta's break (who among us does?) I have tried to incorporate some of what I see. Since I keep my body below the hips rather still I've thrown some wrist into my break, last night really being the first time using this theory. I choked up a little on the cue and just snapped it. Got an awful lot of action on the pack. Gonna stick with it.

Kato

bigbro6060
12-26-2002, 12:46 PM
i think there's many many techniques for adding speed to the break and it's not essential to incorporate every single one of them. I guess choose what works for you and yes there is no doubt that accuracy is still the most important thing.

Since i posted this, i've just been playing around using a bit of a wrist snap on a power draw shot. I'm amazed at how much extra spin i can get ! I can still maintain decent accuracy too. Now i would not change my stroke to incorporate wrist on every shot, definitely not but maybe on that one shot in a thousand when i do need a bit of extra spin, i might add a bit of wrist action.

Kato
12-26-2002, 01:03 PM
I will not add wrist to power shots on the pool table, I think decreases accuracy because you're adding too many variables. Just a full smooth swing and follow through can draw your rock just as far as you need.

Kato

Mike H
12-26-2002, 08:57 PM
Laura, the one thing you need to know as far as any looseness occurring during the break shot is that it does not last through the entire stroke. It isn't the snapping of the wrist that generates the power through the cue, it's the fluid follow through created by the looseness. Try it with no cb, even have someone watch you. Your wrist will become tense before your tip strikes the cb. But the snap that occurs before the tenseness generates a bit more momentum, thus creating more power (and sometimes follow-through). Watch the powerful breakers, Archer, Busta, Feijen, Martel, et al, and you'll see how loose and fluid they appear. The motion of their cue and the related joints is very fluid throughout the stroke, but while the rest of their body appears loose, it does indeed become tense just before the blow is delivered. That is the desired effect. The momentum and power are created, and accuracy is salvaged by the tenseness. Thus, power and control are achieved.
I hope this is somewhat understandable. This seems to be a subject much more easily demonstrated than described.

Regards,
Mike

silverbullet
12-27-2002, 07:16 AM
Thanks Mike. i will try to watch for what you describe when i see them on tv /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

bw

Fred Agnir
12-27-2002, 08:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silverbullet:</font><hr> I think, if I have learned correctly, that the power is supposed to come from the cue . <hr /></blockquote>
When people say "power", they really are talking about energy. And in this particular cuestick/cueball collision, I think we're mostly talking about kinetic energy, where increasing the velocity increases the total energy quicker because velocity is squared.

As an example, if you're using an 18oz cuestick and stroke the cuestick at 15 mph, then an increase to 16 mph is the same as increasing the cuestick to 20.5oz at 15 mph. An increase to 17 mph would be the same as stroking a 23.1 oz cuestick at 15 mph.

The idea of the wrist snap really is just being able to accelerate the cue stick to a higher speed in addition to using the shoulders et al., in the given amount of stroke space. I think it's a good idea to try, but like everything, there might be a bad that comes with the good. I personally think that the people who have the best breaks (fast with control) are the ones who can hit the with a wrist snap to get the higher speed and still maintain accuracy. Some people actually improve accuracy because the looser wrist puts less restrictions on their stroke. YMMV, as always.

Fred