PDA

View Full Version : Common Household Wax Or Polish On Shafts?



Sid_Vicious
01-01-2003, 11:13 AM
Ok I have a cleaned and burninshed shaft for the cue. Are there good and/or bad things laying around the house for applying as a final finish? The can of dusting spray I have says it contains no wax. I'd expect that wax is what I wanted,,,ideas???sid

WaltVA
01-01-2003, 11:46 AM
Sid - It's all personal preference, but I tend to stay away from waxes as they seem to me to get sticky with time, and in hot/humid weather. I like to clean with lighter fluid and burnish, then leather-burnish again after a few hours play -the hand oils seem to be enough to seal the shaft for me.

Walt in VA

Sid_Vicious
01-01-2003, 11:51 AM
Thanks, I've been meaning to get some lighter fluid and experiment with it, probably on one of my lesser valued cues just to be on the safest side. Spiderman conditioned a shaft for me a little bit ago and he used a cue wax he bought off the web, and it was WONDERFUL in it's gliding through the bridge. I suppose I became spoiled with that feeling. Does the lighter fluid slick down like that???sid

WaltVA
01-01-2003, 12:09 PM
Not sure how much extra "glide" is imparted - I just try to keep my shafts reasonably clean and burnish the hand oils into them rather than adding any external wax/polish. Have used Shark Oil and Q-Slick in the past, but always felt my shafts were "gumming up" after a short while, especially in humid weather.

Walt in VA

cheesemouse
01-01-2003, 12:30 PM
Sid,
Somebody here mentioned the use of waxpaper as the final finish after cleaning and burnishing. It sounded so simple and easy that I have been doing it this last week. I'm not saying it's the best thing since sliced bread but I like to travel light and the idea that one could keep waxpaper in a case pocket sounded like the nuts to me...the idea is that you put the waxpaper between your leather piece and shaft then when it heats up a very thin coat of wax is transferred to the shaft...I can tell you that it sure does shine afterwards...so far I like the finish but then I'm not real picky but I do like the nice glide it gives me.

Troy
01-01-2003, 09:52 PM
Sid... I'm with Walt -- Stay away from the wax, use lighter fluid and burnish. My experience is that wax has a tendency to get sticky. For a while I used wax paper (Cheesmouse) but now I even stay from that. I have a soft cloth that has spray silicon on it (not wet, just damp) that also works fairly well.

Troy

TomBrooklyn
01-01-2003, 11:18 PM
I used some car wax once as I wanted to try wax and didn't have any wood wax laying around. It made the normally smooth and slick shaft even slicker. I didn't have any problem with it getting sticky.

I did run into a problem when I tried to perform ding removal, however. I couldn't get water to soak into the dings because the wax is waterproof. I wound up sanding the wax off and won't put it back on because I'd rather be able to readily get dings out than enjoy the marginally greater slickness of a waxed shaft over a simply clean and well maintained one. =Tb

TonyM
01-02-2003, 01:24 AM
As most of you know, I personally reccomend using nothing on the shaft. But that's my personal choice (I find that anything added to a bare wooden shaft speeds up the stickiness factor).

But I have found a few common products that are not too bad.

Orange Glow - it's a wood polish and conditioner that leaves the shaft slippery and smooth. It can be removed with lighter fluid for cleaning and dent removal (remember that to remove dents and dings you want to be able to make the wood swell with moisture, so you don't want to seal the wood completely).

Nu Finish car polish - I've tried the stuff in the orange can (the paste). It does leave the shaft very smooth and slick. And being a petroleum distillate, can also be removed with lighter fluid.

Both are available from most hardware stores and even household and grocery stores.

Enjoy!

Tony

TonyM
01-02-2003, 01:32 AM
I agree completely with "uncle" Walt here! (No surprise to anyone here I'm sure...).

I prefer the natural "patina" from hand oils and wipe the shaft down with lighter fluid after every playing session to clean.

I also wash my hands before every match so that they don't get too dirty.

You could always get some of that cue wax for yourself if you liked it so much.

Most of the shafts that I've worked on for pro players have no finish or sealer, just bare wood with a hand oil patina (some are very "dirty", but they prefer it that way).

In the pro world, you cannot go to the bathroom and wash your hands between turns at the table, and wax and other sealers can cause the shaft to become sticky much faster than with a natural finish.

So you see most pros use a bit of powder, a hand towel, and sometimes a bit of fine sandpaper to keep the shaft smooth while at the table.

If that's o.k. for them, then it's o.k. for me.

Tony
-no finish as always.....

cheesemouse
01-02-2003, 06:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Troy:</font><hr> Sid... I'm with Walt -- Stay away from the wax, use lighter fluid and burnish. My experience is that wax has a tendency to get sticky. For a while I used wax paper (Cheesmouse) but now I even stay from that. I have a soft cloth that has spray silicon on it (not wet, just damp) that also works fairly well.

Troy <hr /></blockquote>

Troy,
Yesterday was the first time I took the waxpapered shaft into serious action, about five hours of sustained play, I did experience it getting sticky on me and I will be going back to lighter fluid for cleaning and a piece of leather for burnishing...see now you guys got me googaning my shafts....geez!!!!!!!!

TomBrooklyn
01-02-2003, 08:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TonyM:</font><hr>I also wash my hands before every match so that they don't get too dirty. <hr /></blockquote>I found keeping my hands clean and wiping the tip chalk off the shaft after every couple of hours of play goes a long way to keeping the shaft nice and slippery smooth. I didn't realize how fast tip chalk builds up on the shaft and how rough and gritty it is until I started wiping it off more often as someone, I think it was TonyM, recommended one time in another thread with a similar subject. A slightly dampened rag or paper towel followed by a dry one seems to do the trick just fine.
=Tb

Fred Agnir
01-02-2003, 08:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TomBrooklyn:</font><hr> I didn't realize how fast tip chalk builds up on the shaft and how rough and gritty it is until I started wiping it off more often as someone, I think it was TonyM, recommended one time in another thread with a similar subject. A slightly dampened rag or paper towel followed by a dry one seems to do the trick just fine.
=Tb <hr /></blockquote>
This is what I do also. It may sound ridiculous, but the slightly damp paper towel after every session has been the best method I've experienced. And at this point, I've tried them all. My newer shafts still look... well... new. Not perfect, but definitely still newish.

Fred

Sid_Vicious
01-02-2003, 09:04 AM
Spiderman said he did this on his trips to the john. I don't know why I never thought about it as well, I take any cue I'm playing with that particular day with me as a habit,,,I decided that I'd add that duty to the routine. It believe that it has made an improvement already, but maybe some of it is peace of mind...sid

Sid_Vicious
01-02-2003, 09:09 AM
Nu Finish, I have that here at the house. Tell me, what is the general procedure used for cleaning with lighter fluid? Thanks...sid

Sid_Vicious
01-02-2003, 09:19 AM
As usual the CCB has proven a wealth of information. I and all of my cue shafts thank you all! sid

WaltVA
01-02-2003, 12:32 PM
Sid - I squirt enough lighter fluid onto a clean, soft cloth (old, well-washed bar towels work great)to make a 50-cent size spot, scrub the shaft vigorously, then wipe with a dry portion of the cloth and burnish with leather. HTH, Walt in VA

Sid_Vicious
01-02-2003, 12:49 PM
sid