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phil in sofla
01-02-2003, 06:02 PM
A little flu got me prematurely into resolution mode 10 days ago or so, and I've dropped one of the evil weeds.

Just as added motivation, what benefits have you seen/will I likely see while shooting pool from stopping cigarettes?

Will victory taste better, for example?

Seriously, I imagine I may have better vision, and maybe better stamina into late hours (typically chain-smoked maybe a pack and a half over a 6-7 hour night of playing), but not that I've noticed so far (in only a couple of sessions of play). Will this show up later, or probably not noticeably at all, or what?

Barbara
01-02-2003, 06:33 PM
Congrats Phil!! This is truly a major step in your life!!

Pretty soon you'll notice that your sense of smell comes back to you and food tastes better because of this. Yes, your metabolism will slow down so try and get some exercise into your life. I'm still battling the weight I put on - Atkins time!! In a month or so you may notice that your concentration increases and that you can remain focused for longer periods at a time. Although you may feel out of whack for a some time while playing pool (I lost interest from time to time) because smoking was a part of your playing routine, the benefits of quitting will pay off in the long run!!

Keep up the good work and congratulations!!!

And you'll notice that extra cash in your pockets, too!! I can't believe they're up to $70 a carton. Whoa!!!

Barbara /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

#### leonard
01-02-2003, 10:29 PM
Soon you will hate smoke filled poolrooms. I am 34 years without ever missing a cigarette. I had this saying I repeated for a month or so before I quit Smoke,Choke,Croak. When I stopped I never ever wanted another cig. ####

=k=
01-03-2003, 06:24 AM
phil one thing for sure! you will live longer to enjoy the game.. as for now, i think you will have a let down.. unless you were one of those that left the cig in mouth while shooting.. well really i have seen it!! good for you glad to see our ex-smoker ranks growing.. k

Rich R.
01-03-2003, 07:04 AM
Phil, you have made a good choice.
I won't comment on stamina or some of the other benefits.
Many years ago, I was a 3 to 4 pack a day smoker and I quit.
About 9 years ago I went to the emergency room and I was told I was having a heart attack. That day and the following week, I spoke to about a dozen doctors and, without exception, they all asked if I smoked. When I told them that I had quit years before, they all said that I was lucky and that I, most likely, would not have survived, if I was still smoking.
You have made a good choice and to succeed, it will not be easy. Like many things, take it one day at a time. When you get the urge to smoke, tell yourself "NO" .
The benefit is, you may live a little longer. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif JMHO.

jjinfla
01-03-2003, 08:10 AM
Well Phil you will find that you will be subject to ridicule by your "friends". They will constantly offer you a cig, blow smoke in your face and just try and convince you how good smoking is. (Between their hacking coughs). I suggest that you start putting the money you were spending on cigs into a jar and see how fast it adds up. And when you get enough go out and buy yourself a nice new case, or stick. That will give you a goal and some positive reinforcement. Jake~~~Can't even imagine New Yorkers paying $7.00 a pack for cigarettes. $100/week. Do they come with a music box playing "you are an idiot"?

sack316
01-03-2003, 02:04 PM
first off, congrats Phil on doing something I have needed to do for a while. I am sick right now, yet still smoke a few a day lol. My main reason for responding is for Barbara though:
"And you'll notice that extra cash in your pockets, too!! I can't believe they're up to $70 a carton. Whoa!!!"

$70 a carton??? Where is this at? If I lived there I for sure would quit. I'm from Alabama, usually I can find Marlboro for $23-$30 when its expensive. I've been smoking Carlyle for a while and they are only $12 a carton. Sorry, I just can't beleive cigs are that expensive in some places.

phil in sofla
01-03-2003, 04:16 PM
She must have been talking NYC. Down here in sofla, Winstons were $32 if full priced, $26 at a common discount rate, $23 at best pricing (all w/6% sales tax on top of that).

The vending machine price per pack was $4.75, so even at its most expensive down here, by the pack, we didn't get into the better part of $100 per carton kind of price she mentions.

Still, I figure I'm $50 to the good already in not quite 2 weeks now. I can buy a pool video per week and still be saving from my previous spending (although unless I get into Accustat match tapes, I have most any video tape I want already).

phil in sofla
01-03-2003, 04:22 PM
Rich:

Glad you made it throught that incident!

Unexplained chest pains were a factor for me, as I'm rounding close to the half century mark in a couple of years. Had a complete workup, stress EKG and all, and it remains a mystery what caused it (evidently not heart disease). The cardiologist used a formula involving my cholesterol, HDL/LDL ratios, etc., and I had a 6% chance of developing heart disease in the next 10 years as a smoker, 2% as a non-smoker.

I was borne in the same year as Efren, so I figured I'd find out what brand he smoked, and start that myself. But Efren quit, last year I think.

Barbara
01-03-2003, 04:26 PM
Yeah guys, I'm talking PA/NJ/NY area, NY being the most expensive. It's actually *only* $60 a carton in NJ and *only* about $45-$55 just over the border in PA.

The legislature in NJ just looooooves to tack on sin taxes to cigarettes the first chance they can for anything and everything. Loads of smokers have quit or just go over the borders to PA and even DE to buy them.

I know they're cheaper the further south you go. Heck, at the WPBA Nats I even bought a carton ($23) for my hubby. I still want him to quit, but I couldn't pass up saving $30.

Barbara~~~three years this January... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

sack316
01-03-2003, 05:34 PM
hell, actually to send ol' sack some cash to buy cigs, pay overnight shipping, and give a generous tip, you'd still be coming out cheaper. lol.

9 Ball Girl
01-03-2003, 07:51 PM
Think about all the $$$ you'll save from not buying cigarettes that you can put towards pool!

Wendy~~you've gotta turn a negative into a positive!

Alfie
01-03-2003, 09:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> Just as added motivation, what benefits have you seen/will I likely see while shooting pool from stopping cigarettes? <hr /></blockquote>

less burns in the cloth

your opponents will be more inclined to kiss you without that ashtray mouth

CarolNYC
01-04-2003, 05:06 AM
Congratulations-thats very strong and I hope you are feeling better from the flu!
You will absolutely see a difference,more oxygen to your brain,think clearer and will smell smoke in a heartbeat!
I remember someone saying,4-5 days of no smoking makes an INCREDIBLE difference in your lungs-stay strong ! I'll be rooting for you!
The price of cigarettes in NY is:
Anywhere from 6.50-8.50/pack-73.00-87.00/carton
Most people buy over the internet or have friends in Miami or Delaware!:):):):):)
Carol

Jon from MN
01-04-2003, 07:39 AM
My uncle smoked 4 pks a day for 15 years. He was a police officer in a small town. He quit in the 60,s and put the money he would have spent on cigs in the bank. He ajusted the money and still does to what ever the cost 35.oo a carton here. he bought a small piece of land with the cig money than sold it bought some more sold it well after all these years and land deals he now lives in a 250,000.00 home and he says its all from the cig money. and he is healthy on top of it. I still smoke quit drugs cant kick the cigs. GRRRRR Jon from Mn

PQQLK9
01-04-2003, 12:36 PM
Congrats Phil...It's a good move for you...just watch the weight ( /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif Lbs).Next month will be 23 years for me.

tateuts
01-06-2003, 05:12 PM
I hate to be realistic and negative, but I am going to be brutally honest with you: You had a very heavy habit that is as difficult to quit as heroin or crack. You can expect depression, fatigue, nervousness, a change in your sleep habits, anger, fights with loved ones, a lot of denial, and maybe even suicidal thoughts. It will be worse, far far worse, if you sneak in a smoke every now and then. Because then you will lie and do anything you can just to smoke, including avoiding your friends and family. If you do sneak in a smoke now and then, you will feel pleasure, but you will also feel guilt and disgust. You will feel the pull of nicotine luring you back.

Everybody has a different experience but that is exactly what my experience was like. Now for the good part. In a few (short) months, if you can resist the temptation, you will feel better, and better, and better, until you feel great all of the time, not just after a smoke. Your cardiovascular system will heal very quickly, and chances of a full health recovery are pretty damn good.

The important thing is to never give up. Just remember, the only thing that will make you feel better is not to smoke. The best thing is to not fall off the mountain. But if you do, pick yourself up and try it again. It's difficult but a lot of us heavy former smokers have proven it's possible.

All the best to you - let us know how you do!

Chris

Terry
01-07-2003, 06:40 AM
Hi Phil, congratulations. They say that day three is the biggest hurdle to get past, so you got it licked! I quit smoking a little over thirteen years ago. I didn't read the other replies so I hope i'm not repeating someone here. The thing I noticed most about my pool after being smoke free is that I will get a headache at alot of the tournaments because of the smoke. Good Luck, Terry

Leviathan
01-07-2003, 07:32 AM
'Lo, Phil.

When I smoked I carried cigarettes and a lighter in my left shirt pocket and nasal spray in my right shirt pocket. (The smoke loused up my sinuses; I couldn't breathe through my nose unless I used the spray every hour or two.) Anyway, there were several occasions when I thought "nasal spray," pulled out the lighter, and started to suck a flame up my nose. Always caught myself in time, however. That's the kind of injury you hate having to explain to people!

Glad I quit--feel much better.

D.M.

Gayle in MD
01-07-2003, 08:47 AM
Hi there, and boy, you are right on the money. I have done all those things, and am about to quit AGAIN! I have quit many times, and for as long as two years, and my husband as long as seven years, and we both seem to get back on the coffin nails again. I absolutely HATE being a smoker, and I am determined to get off and stay off this time. I have been playing so good this year, it has been my great concern also about how my game will be affected when I quit this time. I'm glad that I have my pool table, as it will help to be able to practice in the evenings in a smoke free environment. Addictions are just awful, and the one thing I would change about my life, is that I wish I had never picked up a cigarette.
Anyway, Phil, here are a few suggestions from someone who has quit many times, but then gone back. I will be thinking of you during these next few weeks as I go through this once again, and hopefully for the last time. I'm a pro at the "QUIT" just a failure at staying off!

First, try to identify the emotional reason which led to your becoming a smoker.

EXERCISE! A brisk walk in the morning is just a great way to start the day, also, a treadmill in front of the TV if you are not the outdoorsey type.

Drink buckets of water, with lemmon or lime. Also fruit juices, and avoid caffiene.

EXERCISE!

Avoid high risk situations for the first three weeks.

EXERCISE!

Use black licorish to deal with bad cravings, it works. Gum helps for lots of folks too.

EXERCISE.

Stay away from irritating personalities for a while.

EXEWRCISE!

Put some of your favorite cologne on a handkerchief, and keep it in your pocket when you are in smokey situations so you can create a new "Hand to Face" ritual that smells GOOD! (I use a rose, but you might not look too cool doing that, being a man, LOL.)

EXERCISE!

Start some new project that you can do at home when you need some distraction. Something you have been putting off, or something you always wanted to do but never made time for. In my case, I always paint the house inside when I quit, one room per week, which really helps me as the nice fresh smell of paint reminds me that no matter how much I clean the house, it will be cleaner when no one smokes in it. I also crochet, or do needle work of some kind while watching TV.

EXERCISE!

Select a specific gift or treat every week to buy for yourself with the money you would spend on cigarettes, or put the money in a jar each week for a special long range gift.

EXERCISE!

Have your teeth cleaned, and carry a toothbrush with you and brush often.

EXERCISE!

Consider buying a book on meditation, and give it a fair shot!

EXZERCISE!

Also, CONTROL YOUR ENVIRONMENT! Don't keep any cigarettes around, and don't do the things you did when you smoked the most, when at all possible. (For example, I never smoked in the bedroom, so I watch TV there, instead of in my family room, for the first few weeks.)
As much as you can, don't go around smokers for the first few weeks. This will be the hardest for me because of shooting pool in smokey places, but I hope to make it anyway.
I am going to quit on the thirteenth, and I sure hope we both make it, friend! On thing for sure, this is the last time I'm going through this! Pray for me friend, and I will do the same for you! Oh, and don't forget to exercise!
Gayle in Md.

Rich R.
01-07-2003, 08:57 AM
I think it was Mark Twain who said,
"It is easy to quit smoking, I've done it many times." /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Good luck Gail. I know you can do it.

Gayle in MD
01-07-2003, 09:28 AM
Hi Rich, and thank you. I know you'll be pulling for me! When Scott comes back, I'll hopefully be able to offer you a smoke free environment. I know Scott will appreciate that too, LOL.
Gayle in Md.

SPetty
01-07-2003, 12:32 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Gayle in MD:</font><hr> I have quit many times, and for as long as two years, and my husband as long as seven years, and we both seem to get back on the coffin nails again.
...
Avoid high risk situations for the first three weeks.
...
Also, CONTROL YOUR ENVIRONMENT! Don't keep any cigarettes around, and don't do the things you did when you smoked the most, when at all possible. (For example, I never smoked in the bedroom, so I watch TV there, instead of in my family room, for the first few weeks.)
As much as you can, don't go around smokers for the first few weeks. This will be the hardest for me because of shooting pool in smokey places, but I hope to make it anyway.
<hr /></blockquote>Hi Gayle,

Some great points you made! This one I disagree with, though, and always thought was made up by people that never smoked so never had to quit! (It's been 11 years for me now.)

It was too late for Phil, so I didn't offer this suggestion, but it's just in time for you. I believe that when you first quit is when your resolve to quit is the greatest. I believe that is exactly the right time to go out to the pool hall or to "do the things you did when you smoked the most".

The first day I quit smoking, I went to the pool hall and drank beer and shot pool and didn't smoke. Doing that very early on when your resolve is the greatest proves to yourself that you are easily capable of not smoking while doing those things. It's much easier to do it early than to avoid it for awhile then feel tempted when you finally do it.

Painting the inside of the house is simply ingenious! What a great way to stay busy and help with the old odors!

Oh, and the exercise thing? Good idea. I added almost 50 pounds to my already gifted girth when I quit. It took about two years for my weight to stabilize again.

I will never understand it when people quit smoking for more than two months and start smoking again. By then it's a choice. (A bad choice.) When you make it past two months, consider yourself "done". You don't have to fight it any more. You'll never smoke again. You are a non-smoker. Happily ever after.

Good luck to you, Phil and Gayle. You can do it!

By the way, I actually consider myself a non-smoking smoker. You know, like an alcoholic that doesn't drink? I'm a smoker that doesn't smoke. I still often want to smoke, but that would be a real stupid choice for me so I just don't. Life is a lot easier as a non-smoker.

tateuts
01-07-2003, 03:37 PM
We are sure going to root for Gayle - good luck to her and her husband.

My wife helped me to quit. She pointed out that there is a difference between "quitting" smoking and "abstaining" from smoking. One is a self-denial, the other is a way of life.

My advice is, once you have quit and discarded the addiction and all its side effects, find something in life to really enjoy, something that you really love or love to do. Let that be your addiction.

Mine's my family, and they're pretty damn happy I quit.

Chris

SpiderMan
01-07-2003, 04:55 PM
Phil,

Sadly enough, one of the things you will notice is that some of your smoking friends will go out of their way to tempt you. They'll make it a point to offer you a cigarette on each and every occasion that seems ripe for smoking. Don't fall for it. And, once you're over the hump, don't be an obnoxious lecturing former smoker. Maybe that's why the other smokers try so hard to help you fail, they're afraid of what you will become. Everyone has to make up their own mind.

On the positive side, without a cigarette in your hand or on your breath, you're going to be meeting much classier women!

SpiderMan

phil in sofla
01-07-2003, 08:19 PM
Thanks to all the wellwishers, and good luck to all my fellow newbie quitters as well.

I've done most of the things that prompted a cigarette in the past, including playing pool for hours in a row around smokers, and I'm holding up all right.

Nobody's attempted to sabotage me, and few people have even noticed (which amazes me in the pool hall), and a couple of people have asked about it and encouraged me.

I'm waiting to notice cigarette smoke and find it disgusting, but for now, 10 days on, I barely notice it at all. Getting overly sensitive to pool hall smoke would NOT be a good thing, IMO, so I hope that doesn't eventually happen.

Sleeping is irregular, but that isn't exactly a change. Eating is getting a little out of control, but starting from a reasonable weight, nothing serious yet.

Here's the question on my mind now-- occasional smoking? I used to be an OPB smoker (other peoples' brand), meaning not even a buyer of cigarettes, but bumming an occasional smoke. Obviously, to never become a real smoker again, never having the first one back down that road is a lockup way to do it. But, in your opinion, can one indulge in the odd borrowed cigarette without relapsing, or is that just too dangerous and likely to result in a complete relapse?

They claim that SOME alcoholics can learn to drink in a social way without ruining their lives with boozing. But maybe that, or chippying with a cigarette, is an experiment best left undone?

Alfie
01-07-2003, 11:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> But, in your opinion, can one indulge in the odd borrowed cigarette without relapsing, or is that just too dangerous and likely to result in a complete relapse? <hr /></blockquote> Why gamble? The stakes are too high.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> maybe chippying with a cigarette is an experiment best left undone? <hr /></blockquote> uh...yes.

Rich R.
01-08-2003, 05:58 AM
Don't do it, Phil. JMHO.

=k=
01-08-2003, 06:39 AM
phil my advice would be no!! not only no, but hell no! one can lead to another. you made it this far don't back peddle. keep up the good work.
p.s. if you get weak and have one, don't just give up. you can do it.

silverbullet
01-08-2003, 01:41 PM
Most people who are addicted to any substance cannot do this recreationally, even after long periods of abstention.

i would venture to say if a person can pick back up without it escalating again into a strong habit or addiction, in almost all cases the person was not addicted in the first place. Perhaps it was something they did for a period of time, even ecessively and were able to put it down due to not being a true addict.

I put down cigs and did not smoke for 25 years. I jokingly one day smoked one and started craving agin. For a long time I smoked less than 5 a day then 1/2 pack then a whole pack. I stopped smoking in nov because I had a series of stuff to do with my health and had to if i did not want to keep getting sick.

Unless I want to have the habit again, I cannot smoke at all. I do not say I quit, I say I have not smoked today and that I have not smoked since sometime in nov. I will not say I will never smoke again, only that I have gotten through one more day without doing it.

bw

SpiderMan
01-08-2003, 01:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> Here's the question on my mind now-- occasional smoking? I used to be an OPB smoker (other peoples' brand), meaning not even a buyer of cigarettes, but bumming an occasional smoke. Obviously, to never become a real smoker again, never having the first one back down that road is a lockup way to do it. But, in your opinion, can one indulge in the odd borrowed cigarette without relapsing, or is that just too dangerous and likely to result in a complete relapse?
<hr /></blockquote>

Phil,

Don't risk it. There's nothing to gain. Once the taboo is broken, you're opening yourself to bend the rules further.

Translation: "You're a puff away from a pack a day."

SpiderMan

Gayle in MD
01-09-2003, 08:16 AM
Hi there Spiderman, How's it going? What a great saying, "A Puff away from a pack a day" Never heard that one. And Phil, when you really enjoy smoking, as I have, it really is hard to face the reality that never again will you be able to assuage anything with a cigarette. When I suggested trying to identify the emotional reason behind your decision to start smoking, I was very serious! In my case, I realized that every time I fell back into the habit, there were several reasons behind it....
I have had cigarettes connected with a reward mentality, as in, "I'll finish this, then I'll take a cigarette break," for one. Also, when I get really mad, I reach for a cigarette. I came to realize that I had a habit of turning anger inward, rather than learning to deal with it in appropriate ways. Many times we don't realize the emotional reasons behind the things we do, but they are always there. "Know thy self" The most important words in the english language, IMHO, and especially important when dealing with addiction. I already know that the only way for me to succeed is to accept the fact that I will never be able to pick up a cigarette again, no matter what. Replacing bad habbits with good ones, should be an on going quest in all our lives. "The unexamined life, is not worth living" (Can't remember the author of that quote) We all do things, many things, without ever pausing to question ourselves about the emotional reasons behind our actions, but they are there. All addictions begin in our minds, so the effort to identify the emotional need we try to fill with any given addiction, is a good effort to make.
I am a great advocate of exercise, but unfortunately, as my daughter has pointed out to me, I must have lived my whole life thinking myself invincible! Now, after being a runner all these years, and a smoker too, I am noticing how often I am attending the funerals of many others who thought they were invincible. I really want to live long enough to see my beautiful little grand daughter grow up. Cigarettes are killers, and they kill in a most unpleasant way. Don't ever let yourself think that you can be an occasional smoker. The world is full of occasional smokers who never quit smoking, they just quit buying!
Good luck friend, I'll be thinking of you!
Gayle in Md. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Gayle in MD
01-09-2003, 08:57 AM
Hi there, and congratulations to you. I know it is hard to believe that anyone could be as foolish as I have been all these years. For me, whenever I quit, there has always been a part of me that didn't want to quit, since I enjoy smoking very much. It's always felt like I was giving up something that I enjoy, but unfortunately is very bad for me. Although there are many moments of feeling joy and self gratification, each time you are in a high risk situation and you succeed in not reaching for a cigarette, there are also moments of great frustration. In the beginning, I must make it is easy on myself as I can, by not tempting myself atleast until the physical withdrawel has past. It sounds to me like you had tremendous resolve when you quit! I hope I can harness some of that! Perhaps your addiction was not quite are great as mine?? Although I have never smoked a whole pack of cigarettes in a day, the ones that I do smoke, I really really want!! LOL. I have to use all the distraction and pampering I can muster in the beginning! The first three weeks are really tough for me. My resolve doesn't kick in good until I struggle, claw, and cuss my way through those first few weeks. I have a lot of will power, just not much won't power, LOL. I guess it is different for everyone! I really wish there was someplace I could go where they could keep me sedated and feed me though my veins for three weeks, LOL. The good part is that after I get through that, my self esteem goes through the roof, and I start to really enjoy all the benefits that come from not smoking, particularly the enhanced sense of smell. Oh well, it's basically a b*tch anyway you cut it, but addictions always cost you more than you can afford to pay, one way or the other! I just have to keep it right in the front of my mind that at my age, if I don't get this monkey off my back, I'll end up paying with my life, and when I look at it that way, cigarettes don't take on the feel of a reward! Thanks for the good wishes though, and I would advise all the rest of the CCBers to stay out of Maryland for a while after the 13th, LOL.
Gayle in Md. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif