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01-08-2003, 07:24 PM
I have terrible problems with my hands when I bridge. They seem to get "sticky" after my first few shots. This is a major destroyer of confidence for me. I've tried pretty much everything, from washing my hands like a maniac to powders. Nothing seems to work... Just wondering if someone has a piece of golden advice for keeping my hands dry and smooth when I shoot. Many thanks in advance.... ST

01-08-2003, 07:38 PM
Well, as far as the bridge hand, try a glove. I just started using one a couple weeks ago, after frowning on them for a long time. I don't know why, they just looked... funny. But now that I know what I've been missing, I kick myself for not trying it sooner.

The only problem is will I still be able to play without it! Maybe I'll fold one up really thin, seal it in plastic, and carry it in my wallet for those "emergencies." (kinda reminds me of high-school, if you know what I mean... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif])

Leviathan
01-08-2003, 08:56 PM
Does your cue have a graphite shaft, by any chance? Some graphite shafts play sticky even when they are clean. Yeah, the gloves work--many good 3-C players wear a glove nowadays.

D.M.

01-08-2003, 09:31 PM
Nope... it's a wood shaft... and I keep it clean by wiping it down with a cloth after every few hours of play.

qSHAFT
01-08-2003, 09:49 PM
Hey there,

I used to have similar problems. I think the main thing to remember besides washing and drying your hands every so often is to make sure that you only use your bridge hand for one thing - bridging. If you use it to hold a cup or eat with it it will gunk up in no time. I usually keep my hand hand flat on my jeans with fingers slightly separated when I am sitting down and I find that the jeans absorb any sweat that develops and the hand stays very dry. Also don't let anyone use your cue that doesn't adheed to these high standards else it is pointless doing it yourself.

I originally went the way of the glove but now that I am aware of what I am doing with the bridge hand I find I don't need it anymore.

Hope this helps you out.

Jon from MN
01-08-2003, 10:06 PM
This was a major problem for me to. Now I make sure my hands are clean. I dont touch anyting and I hold my cue with a towel. I also towel my cue after every turn. I hope this helps ~~ Jon ~~

Scott Lee
01-09-2003, 03:07 AM
Get a pool glove! $10 in any poolroom or billiard supply store.

Scott Lee

Buckster_uk
01-09-2003, 05:58 AM
Before each match I play in tournaments, I wash my hands and dry them, plus I only use my towel for my hands, I havent used a towel on my shaft in a while. Also, when playing, try not to hold your hand onto the shaft for too long, you easily perspirate. Once you have finished playing your shot and sit down, put the cue to one side, I find if i hold onto it, my hand gets real sweaty. Listen to the point that qSHAFT made too, make sure no one uses your cue and also dont try and touch anything when playing, if you have a drink, use the gripping hand.

Fred Agnir
01-09-2003, 08:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SneakyT:</font><hr> Nope... it's a wood shaft... and I keep it clean by wiping it down with a cloth after every few hours of play. <hr /></blockquote>
Damp cloth or dry? Your stick might need to be stripped.

Fred

Fran Crimi
01-09-2003, 08:58 AM
Hi ST,

I had the same problem in my early days playing pool. My problem was that I was bridging too tightly with a closed bridge, not letting any air in between my fingers and the cue. You don't really need to clamp down on the cue so tightly. Try loosening up your fingers around the cue.

I find that two things are most important in good bridging----pressing your fingers into the cloth with a little pressure (not a lot, just a little) so your bridge hand remains stable, and to keep your fingers and thumb as still as possible while the cue is moving through them.

You can accomplish both of these without clamping down on the cue.

Also, make sure your fingers are spread out on the table and your entire palm isn't flush against the cloth. Not only is it better for stability, but will promote air circulation around and under your hand.

Fran

Stretch
01-09-2003, 01:43 PM
When you wash your hands before a match, or during your time out, hold your bridge hand under the cold water for as long as you can stand it. This closes all the pours, and while it is not a permanent fix, it will keep your hands dry for much longer than if you just washed only. Keep a towel by your chair and use it on your cue at every opportunity. It also helps to blow on your hand with pursed lips. St

Stretch
01-09-2003, 01:57 PM
Heh Fran!! Great to hear from you. That was good advice. I was especially interested in the part about pressing the table. My bridge hand was never one of my strong points. Maybe thats why? St.~~big clumsy hands~~

Rod
01-09-2003, 02:05 PM
I don't know if it has been mentioned, there is a product called Pro Glide. A couple of drops spread on the fingers where the cue rubs will make it slick. I used it a couple of times in high humidity and it worked well. Keep your bridge hand open and off the cue when not shooting.

caedos
01-09-2003, 02:06 PM
On the chance that you are the rare person whose hands sweat excessively and often, you might consider seeing a specialist about corrective surgery. They cut a nerve and - shazaam!- no more sweating of the hands. If it's overproduction of natural oils (not sweat), I just wash my hands twice using twice the amount of soap I normally use for hygienic purposes.

Oz

TonyM
01-09-2003, 05:30 PM
First off, for someone with your (quite common actually) problem I recommend removing any finish or sealer from the surface of the shaft (use some 320 grit sandpaper to remove, then finish with 400 to 1000 grit).

I have found that a slick finish keeps the hand oils and dirt on the surface of the cue where they can build-up and lead to stickiness.

A bare wood shaft, cleaned regularily with lighter fluid or rubbing alcohol, will absorb some of the hand oils, and stay smoother, longer imo.

Of course, for a real chronic problem, you might want to consider a pool glove. Personally, I'd rather enjoy playing than worry about what anyone else thought of my pool apparel! Lol!

For most people, regular hand washing, and a shaft wipe down with a damp/dry paper towel with some occasional bit of powder (used sparingly) is sufficient to keep the stickiness at bay.

In your case, perhaps the glove is the best short term solution.

As mentioned, there are products that coat the hands to keep them slick and smooth, and there may be other products that prevent excess perspiration etc.

Good luck!

Tony

01-10-2003, 12:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SneakyT:</font><hr> I have terrible problems with my hands when I bridge. They seem to get "sticky" after my first few shots. This is a major destroyer of confidence for me. I've tried pretty much everything, from washing my hands like a maniac to powders. Nothing seems to work... Just wondering if someone has a piece of golden advice for keeping my hands dry and smooth when I shoot. Many thanks in advance.... ST <hr /></blockquote>

bro,

do da glove. endof problem. no worry.

but, get several of them and make sure you are never more without one. thats what you have to do when you become addicted to a pool aid. i'm that way with magnetic pocket chalks. can't shoot without one so i keep them all around.

anyway, stop foolin with it and do the gloves.

dan

01-10-2003, 12:55 PM
Thanks to everyone for all of the great input. I picked up a glove yesterday, and it seems to have solved my
problem.
Fred- I use a cue cube slicker on my cue... I should have been more specific, sorry /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif What do you mean by stripped?

Fran Crimi
01-10-2003, 04:40 PM
Wow. That's just plain rude. Stop fooling with all that other stuff just go get a glove? A lot of people here have offered some fine advice regarding shaft care and hand care.

I just phoned up a top level player friend and asked his opinion of what he would tell a player who has a problem with a sweaty bridge hand. Without hesitation he said, I'd tell him he's probably gripping the cue too tightly. I really have to agree with that because I've come across thousands of students over the years, many who have complained about a sweaty hand and all of them fairly inexperienced players who haven't refined their fundamentals. Every one of them who took the same advice that was given in this thread regarding shaft care, hand care and proper bridging, no longer had sweaty hand problems.

We all know that opinions are like.....everyone's got one, mine is that a glove takes something away from the feel of the shot, especially delicate finesse shots. I am not alone in this opinion.

I highly suggest you don't do the glove until you've absolutely exhausted every possibility and even then, you'd have a hard time convincing me that you had. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran

TonyM
01-10-2003, 11:29 PM
"What do you mean by stripped?"

Take any finish or sealer off of the wood from the stroking area of the shaft.

Most of the time I see people complaining about sticky hands, the problem is mostly with the stock shiny sealer applied to the shaft.

Tony

01-11-2003, 03:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> Wow. That's just plain rude. Stop fooling with all that other stuff just go get a glove? A lot of people here have offered some fine advice regarding shaft care and hand care.

I just phoned up a top level player friend and asked his opinion of what he would tell a player who has a problem with a sweaty bridge hand. Without hesitation he said, I'd tell him he's probably gripping the cue too tightly. I really have to agree with that because I've come across thousands of students over the years, many who have complained about a sweaty hand and all of them fairly inexperienced players who haven't refined their fundamentals. Every one of them who took the same advice that was given in this thread regarding shaft care, hand care and proper bridging, no longer had sweaty hand problems.

We all know that opinions are like.....everyone's got one, mine is that a glove takes something away from the feel of the shot, especially delicate finesse shots. I am not alone in this opinion.

I highly suggest you don't do the glove until you've absolutely exhausted every possibility and even then, you'd have a hard time convincing me that you had. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran



<hr /></blockquote>

i wasn't taking anything away from the guys who know how to make a shaft slick; i was figuring that the guy had tried everything in the world and the fact was, his hands sweated a lot. the only cure i know of for that is a glove.

i know lots of heavy players who use gloves these days.

there's some biofeedback stuff out there where you can learn how to control sweating but i don't know where to find it.

dan...

Barbara
01-11-2003, 08:27 AM
I have the same problem with my hands. When I started playing pool I used to play with an open bridge on every shot. Then I bought a Sir Joseph glove. Contrary to popular belief, that glove is thin enough that I can feel the slightest ding in my shaft. I tried "Pro-Glide" for a while, but after a few games the chalk would start to stick to my hands and I'd have to go and wash up and re-apply the stuff. It's great stuff, don't get me wrong. But I think it would work better for someone with less sweaty hands than me.

Barbara

01-11-2003, 08:41 AM
Barbara, that's the same glove I use, and I love it. I'm certainly not arguing with you Fran -- you're far more an expert at pool than I could ever be -- but for me personally, after 15-20 years of playing pool, I don't feel like I'm giving up any "feel" either. The glove is very thin, as Barbara mentioned, and it just feels so much better. Also, I'm finding that it reduces chalk staining on the shaft because chalk doesn't stick to the glove like it does to your hands. I chalk often, before nearly every shot (as one should), and always seem to have residue on my bridge hand. The dust just falls, blows, or rubs off of my glove effortlessly, whereas before it stuck to my hand and rubbed into the shafts. So I would think the reduced need to clean &amp; strip the shaft would be a benefit by prolonging shaft life as well.

I dunno -- it's too early to tell since I've been using a glove for only a month. But so far, I've been pleased. As with other things in life, though, YMMV (Your Mileage May Vary).

David

Fran Crimi
01-11-2003, 10:57 AM
I guarantee those heavy players you're referring to already learned how to do what they do before they started wearing a glove, and IMO, their future progress with finessing the ball can be greatly hindered.

Take golf for example: Golfers wear a very thin leather glove that fits tightly over their hand, not unlike a pool glove. But they wear it because if they didn't, they'd get cuts and blisters on their hand. But what do they do just before they're getting ready to putt? They take off the glove. When they're through putting, they put the glove back on again. So it's 'take the glove off...put the glove back on' every single hole. That can be a pain, but they do it because they don't want to compromise their 'feel' when they putt.

Players with sweaty hands should examine their patterns-- do they sweat all the time, or just when competing? If it's just when competing, they may be bridging too tightly because they're nervous or just sweating because they're nervous (which, yes can be controlled through visualization and meditation-type exercises). If they sweat when they play socially and aren't feeling nervous, they should definitely check their grip for tightness and make sure their hands and shaft are clean.

I know sweating. I sweat in winter during snowstorms. My bridge hand used to sweat. It doesn't anymore.

Fran

Fran Crimi
01-11-2003, 01:24 PM
David and Barbara,

I totally understand where you are coming from. Just hear me out for a minute....

Pool is a game of vibrations; some are strong, many are subtle. When you strike the cue ball, vibrations resonate through both your front and back hands. That's what consititutes 'feel', and when you're in that zone that everyone keeps talking about, where it all comes together, those vibrations play a pivital role. Most players don't pay conscious attention to them, but they're there and they're registering in your unconscious mind with every shot you shoot.

It's not any different from being a musician. Anything that comes between your skin and your instrument, no matter how thin, compromises that feel. With pool, it's especially crucial for the front hand which is the one that picks up the really, really subtle vibrations.

When you're in the zone, without realizing it, you know without conscious thought what tension you need to have in your back hand to produce the desired feel you want to achieve in your front hand, which ultimately gives you what you want the cue ball to do on the table. You observe the cue ball do a certain thing, your unconscious mind relates that with a certain vibrationary feel and registers it in the memory bank.

What happens if you muffle that vibration, even if it's ever so slightly?


Fran

Wally_in_Cincy
01-11-2003, 01:35 PM
but if you use a glove all the time you would develop a feel for that just as well. wouldn't you?

wouldn't it be just like getting used to a new cue or a new tip? after awhile you develop the feel...

Fran Crimi
01-11-2003, 01:37 PM
Nope. You'll always be deprived of certain vibrations. Your unconscious mind may not be able to tell between two very similar hits but not quite the same.

Good question, though.

Fran

Wally_in_Cincy
01-11-2003, 01:44 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> Nope. You'll always be deprived of certain vibrations. Your unconscious mind may not be able to tell between two very similar hits but not quite the same.

Good question, though.

Fran <hr /></blockquote>

OK I agree with that but in the overall scheme of things I don't think it's as important as having a non-sticky bridge hand.

Fran Crimi
01-11-2003, 01:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> Nope. You'll always be deprived of certain vibrations. Your unconscious mind may not be able to tell between two very similar hits but not quite the same.

Good question, though.

Fran <hr /></blockquote>

OK I agree with that but in the overall scheme of things I don't think it's as important as having a non-sticky bridge hand. <hr /></blockquote>


You're absolutely correct. So let's address the next issue: Sweaty hands. Do you treat the symptom or the source? If you treat the symptom, you'll be wearing a glove the rest of your pool-playing life. Think about how many years that could be of total dependency on a glove. Think about how miserable you'll be when you forgot your glove...also, think about your future progress in the game...is it being hindered because sometime in the past you decided to stop exploring the source of your problem?

Within the framework of a basic recommended bridge, there are a multitude of variations that are worth exploring, which I think all players should do even if their hands don't sweat. Trust me...the culprit is in the bridging.


Fran

Wally_in_Cincy
01-11-2003, 01:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr>
You're absolutely correct. So let's address the next issue: Sweaty hands. Do you treat the symptom or the source? If you treat the symptom, you'll be wearing a glove the rest of your pool-playing life. Think about how many years that could be of total dependency on a glove. Think about how miserable you'll be when you forgot your glove...also, think about your future progress in the game...is it being hindered because sometime in the past you decided to stop exploring the source of your problem?

Within the framework of a basic recommended bridge, there are a multitude of variations that are worth exploring, which I think all players should do even if their hands don't sweat. Trust me...the culprit is in the bridging.

Fran <hr /></blockquote>

Treat the problem, not the symptom. I agree. I should know not to engage in a battle of wits with you. You use logic well /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Gotta go. Talk to everyone Monday.

01-12-2003, 12:04 AM
i switched two days ago and have been keeping a cue slide (powder bag) in my case and using it as neccesarry and you do play better you do feel more its the truth.

01-12-2003, 02:31 PM
Ok Fran... You made me think a bit more about it, and I guess you're right... I could see the glove becoming a crutch. I've been working on not holding anything in my bridge hand and loosening my bridge. These have helped a little bit, but I'm still experiencing some problems with a "sticky bridge" I'm curious to know about stripping my shaft. How would I go about doing this? Again, thanks to everyone for all of the replys.

Fran Crimi
01-12-2003, 06:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SneakyT:</font><hr> Ok Fran... You made me think a bit more about it, and I guess you're right... I could see the glove becoming a crutch. I've been working on not holding anything in my bridge hand and loosening my bridge. These have helped a little bit, but I'm still experiencing some problems with a "sticky bridge" I'm curious to know about stripping my shaft. How would I go about doing this? Again, thanks to everyone for all of the replys. <hr /></blockquote>


Good! Now just keep at it and keep exploring different bridge positions, also, as you suggested, your shaft may have some build-up on it. Suggestion: Ask a friend with a smooth shaft to let you try theirs and see how it feels. Also, ask someone to take a look at your shaft and give you their opinion on it. I'm confident you'll find the answers if you persevere. Just keep at it and don't give up.

Thanks for giving it a try.

Fran

TonyM
01-13-2003, 01:58 AM
To "strip" the finish from your shaft you need some medium sandpaper to start with (say 220 grit or so) and finish with finer and finer grades. A decent cue repair person could do it in a few minutes on a lathe, but you certainly could do it yourself by hand if you are careful.

Tony

Wally_in_Cincy
01-13-2003, 08:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TonyM:</font><hr> To "strip" the finish from your shaft you need some medium sandpaper to start with (say 220 grit or so) and finish with finer and finer grades. A decent cue repair person could do it in a few minutes on a lathe, but you certainly could do it yourself by hand if you are careful.

Tony <hr /></blockquote>

220 seems a bit coarse don't you think? It could be done with something finer, just requires a bit more work. I use Q-Smooth papers.

MarkUrsel
01-13-2003, 08:47 AM
What I do is every day before a tournament or league match, I use a mild cleaner on the cue to get all the dirt and oils off of it. After letting it dry from that, I take a kitchen green (those green nylon grill cleaner pads) and lightly sand the shaft with it - and here's the trick, I put baby powder on the kitchen green first. When I'm done, the cue is absolute silk. Keep the pad in your cue case for light touch-ups during a match if the cue gets grungy. That's what works for me.

01-13-2003, 04:23 PM
I have the same problem. I notice that it becomes more prominant if I'm grasping my shaft while my opponent is shooting. I just end up sweating on the thing and then, even if I wipe it down, it's not quite the same the rest of the night. The pool glove is a good suggestion too. I've got a friend who swears by it. Personally, I'm a little vain and don't like the way it looks on me.