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View Full Version : Anybody ever play in a rage?



silverbullet
01-12-2003, 11:35 AM
WW has been after me to hit harder but could rarely hit hard speed without compromising stroke. I heard that women could not break as hard as a man so the men were better.

Today I went into a rage over some dumb thing and took it out on the balls. I did not even know I could hit them that hard. 2-3 going in on the break etc.

In a rage, I found myself much more focussed and super adrenalin like I could do anything and could not miss, even combos banks and hard long shots. Of course I did miss some, but not as many as usual, it just felt that way.

I always did best at karate when i was mad too. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Anybody ever had this kind of experience?

bw

Ryan
01-12-2003, 12:04 PM
Personally, I don't shoot best when I'm mad at something (or someone). Even though I might go for (and make) a few shots that I otherwise might not have taken, I ususally end up coming up short on a run.

The adrenaline and lack of focus usually take their toll in the end where I rattle a shot that should have gone clean.

My father, on the other hand, plays his best when someone has genuinely made him mad. His normal game is more tentative, where he would rather play a brutal safety than go for the run out. When he is mad, that tentative streak disappears, and he absolutely destroys opponents. It takes quite a bit to bring him to that point, but his game is something to see when he's there.

01-12-2003, 12:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ryan:</font><hr> Personally, I don't shoot best when I'm mad at something (or someone). Even though I might go for (and make) a few shots that I otherwise might not have taken, I ususally end up coming up short on a run.

The adrenaline and lack of focus usually take their toll in the end where I rattle a shot that should have gone clean.

My father, on the other hand, plays his best when someone has genuinely made him mad. His normal game is more tentative, where he would rather play a brutal safety than go for the run out. When he is mad, that tentative streak disappears, and he absolutely destroys opponents. It takes quite a bit to bring him to that point, but his game is something to see when he's there. <hr /></blockquote>

funny.

i've not had occasion to even think about this in a while as i am a very sweet and timid person but...

on the rare occasion when i have played with the deeply heartfelt desire to have something really bad happen to the s.o.b. across the table, not just for the money but rather in an italian kinda way, it's sometimes been kinda scary. not something i can do on purpose but on the very rare occasion that it happens it can be laser sharp.


dan...remember in your planning that, when it's all said and done, the really hard part is disposing of the body.

silverbullet
01-12-2003, 12:56 PM
You bring up a valid point. I think I am more like your dad. I tend to be too layed back and tentative, tending to just knock in a few easy balls and then safe rather than take a chance and play more aggressively. And even if I do go for the harder shot, I always have a back door. ie if I miss, they cannot see their balls and have to kick or if they can see them, they are left long and hard. While this does not seem to be bad strategy, I think it is negative self talk and reinforces already my poor confidence of 'I am bad at potting and can just play safe'. i think this kind of thinking has lost me a few matches.

So, ww is layed back too and says he plays better when angry. So I think it is a way to break out and be more aggressive.

bw

Vapros
01-12-2003, 01:31 PM
Here's another instance of playing in a rage. Have you ever seen a guy who was in love with losing? Just can't get enough of it - chances are he's in a rage of his own - furious at himself for what he's doing but can't help doing it anyway. He'll bet anything you want and lose without making much effort until the rage or the money runs out.

I knew a man who got that way quite often. He would hardly stop walking to hit the ball. There was no chance of his winning anything and that's the way he liked it, at that moment. It's a deadly disability and expensive as hell.

Probably not the same rage you are talking about, but still, a genuine rage. I don't know if they're related....

cheesemouse
01-12-2003, 01:56 PM
There have been numerous times where I have been worn out, at the end of my rope, satisfied and ready to except third or fourth place when the a$$hole that is beating me has to rub it in and pi$$ me off and I have come off the bench with flames shooting out of my pant legs and snorting like a bull that can't be rode. The new energy has ended up carry me on to three or four more hours of good enough play to win it all...I like it when jerks make me mad enough to dig deep and give it my all. After one tournament I gave a guy $50 and thanked him for being a total dipstick....LOL LOL

I wouldn't call it rage but more like a controlled determination driven by a want to bitch slap the guy who made me mad. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

silverbullet
01-12-2003, 02:00 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Vapros:</font><hr> Here's another instance of playing in a rage. Have you ever seen a guy who was in love with losing? Just can't get enough of it - chances are he's in a rage of his own - furious at himself for what he's doing but can't help doing it anyway. He'll bet anything you want and lose without making much effort until the rage or the money runs out.

I knew a man who got that way quite often. He would hardly stop walking to hit the ball. There was no chance of his winning anything and that's the way he liked it, at that moment. It's a deadly disability and expensive as hell.

Probably not the same rage you are talking about, but still, a genuine rage. I don't know if they're related.... <hr /></blockquote>

curious, think what you describe is often recognized by the person as a negative outlook on life and maybe depression and others see a total lack of self worth. I have heard this spoken of as 'anger turned inward'. This of which I speak was anger turned outward. In that, there was lots of confidence and nothing exiswted but the emotion and the pool balls.

I think a certain amount of anger is a good thing. We got back on apa due to an unexpected break in my schedule for the good. On thurs night, I was playing worse than I ever had. I was playing this two. I was so bad but then I got mad and there was no way he was going to beat or even win a game offa me. And guess what, he did not. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

bw

snipershot
01-12-2003, 02:05 PM
Whenever i'm playing bad and missing alot of shots, I take out all my frustration on the break getting great results, the problem is that I was missing alot of shots in the first place making my good breaks pretty much useless.

01-12-2003, 05:15 PM
In league, we always used to quote Bill Murray in groundhog day when the groundhog is driving. "Don't Drive Angry". "Don't Shoot Angry".

Popcorn
01-12-2003, 06:46 PM
Rage is an awfully strong word. I can't say I have even come close to being in a rage over a pool game. I doubt I have even been very mad over a pool game. In fact, I enjoy the challenge of the game, if it were easy, it would not be much fun. It is also funny you mention karate. I used to box as an amateur and trained at the 5th street gym in Miami beach at the same time as Clay. I knew him pretty good. I knew a lot of pro boxers and one thing they always told me was losing your head is bad, just stick with your game plan and don't blow up. Once a guy sees he can get to you, your in trouble. You should never get mad when competing. What ever short term gain you think you experienced, in the long run would be bad. Not to mention, I doesn't sound healthy, you are supposed to be having fun. I am serious, If the game ever got to where it could get me in a rage, I would probably not play.

silverbullet
01-13-2003, 08:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Rage is an awfully strong word. I can't say I have even come close to being in a rage over a pool game. I doubt I have even been very mad over a pool game. In fact, I enjoy the challenge of the game, if it were easy, it would not be much fun. It is also funny you mention karate. I used to box as an amateur and trained at the 5th street gym in Miami beach at the same time as Clay. I knew him pretty good. I knew a lot of pro boxers and one thing they always told me was losing your head is bad, just stick with your game plan and don't blow up. Once a guy sees he can get to you, your in trouble. You should never get mad when competing. What ever short term gain you think you experienced, in the long run would be bad. Not to mention, I doesn't sound healthy, you are supposed to be having fun. I am serious, If the game ever got to where it could get me in a rage, I would probably not play. <hr /></blockquote>

In the rage I was in, I loved the feeling because I had power and I was relentless and there is an anger that is just this side of loss of control. I had no desire to break my stick or anything but just the focus of power generated by peer anger

I have been so mad my eyes turned black and I became hyper with the rage within but yet could hold myself back from that line of total loss of control and funnel it into a physical thing like karate and then like pool yesterday.

When I went into this state in karate, i felt no fear, and did not worry if i got hit or got ribs broke (although i never did) I was totally relentless out for the kill and if they got me well i would get a big chunk of them . that was my mind set.

it was a total adrenalin high full of the euphoria from the power of strong emotion and the total banishment of fear coursing through my veins.

bw

Popcorn
01-13-2003, 08:40 AM
Sounds like you are describing being on a drug. It can't be good, will in no way help your pool game or your life for that matter. Try just enjoying the game. I would not wish those kinds of feelings on anybody, I can't imagine they have any place in pool, I have too much respect and love for the game. You just don't see the beauty in it, I am sorry.

TomBrooklyn
01-13-2003, 05:26 PM
Au Contrar, I think bw has gotten in touchy with the incindiary ssesence of the primordial force. This is very reason to play pool and the point of being alive. Brava!

silverbullet
01-13-2003, 09:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TomBrooklyn:</font><hr> Au Contrar, I think bw has gotten in touchy with the incindiary ssesence of the primordial force. This is very reason to play pool and the point of being alive. Brava! <hr /></blockquote>

Yes. I took the anger which is a very base emotion and because I do not let it over the edge, I redirected that emotion so that I could play with power and super focus.

Do I see the beauty of the game? Popcorn, I doubt i see pool like you. There are times I am almost in a meditative state and and just am emmersed in the stroke, follow freeze and the click of the balls.Other times I am completely focussed and out for the kill, usually this happens in a match. It has not happened on my table before. But ww was impressed with the improvement in my plaqy and said he would try to get me mad before the match. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

I certainly do not take drugs either. I do not drink either. To a lessor degree, it has gotten so that in a match, there is a very strong emotion. maybe not anger but a relentless drive to show no mercy and in every cell of my body to try to bury the opponent. Even if that person is a friend, in a match they become my adversary, not someone to be kind too [even thoug we do complement on shots], but never losing sight of the main goal, to go after them in the match with complete abandon.

bw

Popcorn
01-13-2003, 11:02 PM
With all due respect, that is the typical, stereotypical stuff you see in the movies and on TV. That is not what goes through the minds of most real professional competitors. You don't need to hate your opponent to win. You do however need to know how to play, that may be the biggest asset toward winning. I know players who think people don't want to play them because they play so good. Actually they are just creepy to play with, so you avoid them. They think they are the ultimate competitors, they are actually just unpleasant. It is a bunch of BS, It will not make you a better competitor or player, just unpopular.

silverbullet
01-14-2003, 06:48 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> With all due respect, that is the typical, stereotypical stuff you see in the movies and on TV. That is not what goes through the minds of most real professional competitors. You don't need to hate your opponent to win. You do however need to know how to play, that may be the biggest asset toward winning. I know players who think people don't want to play them because they play so good. Actually they are just creepy to play with, so you avoid them. They think they are the ultimate competitors, they are actually just unpleasant. It is a bunch of BS, It will not make you a better competitor or player, just unpopular. <hr /></blockquote>

I have never lost my temper in a match. The adrenalin rush is all inside of me.I become super focussed, do not want to chat, become very serious, methodical, plan out the t able and play with a vengeance. I am fair, I follow the rules, if I accidently tap a ball or something, even if they do not see it, I am honest and give thelm bih. But when i am playing I am very determined and do not take it easy on my opponent, no matter how far ahead I am.

bw