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View Full Version : Tips for Long Shots?



01-14-2003, 07:34 PM
I'm having a lot of trouble with long shots, especially the ones with no or little angle, almost straight in. The bad part is I'm not even missing consistently, so I can determine whats wrong. Balls are going everywhere! Any tips?

Rod
01-14-2003, 08:48 PM
Junior,
This might help. Instead of aiming for center pocket pick a specific aim point. By that I mean aim to the left inside edge say 5 shots, then aim at the right inside edge another 5 times. By picking a specific area it should help you stay focused. You pick the distance but I'd suggest starting off close and increasing the distance. Another way is to put another ball near the pocket so it slightly blocks your o/b. Don't hit that ball. I can't see your stroke so you may be moving on the shot or any number of things. Another opiton is close your eyes on the last stroke. This makes you aware of the "feel" in your grip and shooting arm.

Golfers do this, instead of just hitting somewhere in a fairway. They pick a landing point usually by a draw or a fade to that area. Without doing that the ball could go anywhere. Similar in pool especially if you need to hit one side of the pocket to play position.

Tom_In_Cincy
01-14-2003, 08:49 PM
Try the shots a little closer together at first and then increase the distance.

I like to put a little top center tip at most.. to keep the cue ball rolling straight..

bigbro6060
01-14-2003, 10:02 PM
Work on your stroke

long straight pots are all about cueing, if you have a good stroke, they will be quite easy

01-14-2003, 10:07 PM
If the shot is truly straight in ignore the object ball and aim for the center of the pocket looking past the ball. After you strike the cue ball then look at the object ball and see where you strike it. No need to begin at a close distance with this method and I have found it cures the "straight-in-shot" blues quickly and permanently.

Jimbo

cheesemouse
01-14-2003, 11:27 PM
9 Ball Junior,
Try shortening your backstroke and exaggerate your follow thru; stay down.

9 Ball Girl
01-14-2003, 11:39 PM
First, is your stroke straight? A good way to find out is to place the cue ball at the head spot. Then aim for the 2nd diamond on the long rail and shoot. If the CB comes back and hits the center of your tip, then you've got your stroke straight. You have to stay down for this. Then, try doing the same thing only this time, place the CB on the head rail and aim for the second daimond on the short rail for the long shot. Again, stay down and if the CB comes back and hits the tip squarely, then your stroke is straight:

START(
%Pg6O5%Ug9[8%Vg7P5%]C2P0%^f3O5

)END

Another thing is to set up some straight in shots and move the CB back a diamond at a time. Remember, stay down and follow through!

Wendy~~9 Ball Girl must help 9 Ball Junior http://www.smilies.org/basesmilies/1040740433.gif

01-14-2003, 11:45 PM
This is off-topic, don't want to derail the thread but what is the example format people use on this forum? I didn't find anything in the FAQ's.

I.E. the START( bunch of control characters ) END

I'm guessing it's a pool table layout with balls but all I see is the letters.

Thanks

9 Ball Girl
01-14-2003, 11:53 PM
Oops! I should've included a link to the WEI Table in my post. In any case, here's a previous post of mine explaining how to use it:

http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=ccb&Number=51379&Forum=All _Forums&Words=9%20Ball%20Girl&Match=Username&Searc hpage=5&Limit=25&Old=allposts&Main=51379&Search=tr ue#Post51379

01-15-2003, 12:12 AM
Ahhhhhh, thank you. I forgot there were other forums (i.e. Newbies) on this site. I found a posting on it just as I came back here.

Thanks

Chris Cass
01-15-2003, 01:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9 ball junior:</font><hr> I'm having a lot of trouble with long shots, especially the ones with no or little angle, almost straight in. The bad part is I'm not even missing consistently, so I can determine whats wrong. Balls are going everywhere! Any tips? <hr /></blockquote>

9 ball Junior,

Welcome to the board. First let me point out that, the straight-in shot is the hardest shot there is. That being said, I have two words of the best advice I would give my Mom, if she would let me get a word in edge wise. LOL

OK, get with RandyG' (Master Instructor) Pool School or try to catch Scott Lee ( taking his Masters course, as we speak) when he's out your way. It's in your mechanics without a doubt. This is a big area where a simple movement or placement will help you for life. These are BCA Qualified instructors and extremely versed in this subject. This is also going to cost money. What's money? It's nothing compared to the start it will give you in advancement and further returns to come your way. So, money is nothing.

Why do you need a Master BCA Instructor? You don't but you have access to them and they will be well worth the costs to you down the road. Be smart.

Next, set up this shot after knowing exactly what good mechanics are for you individually speaking.

START(
%AO0X3%Pg4R5%WC0[3%Xf9R6%[D5[0%\N3X5%eB3b4

)END

Once your mechanics are right. Shoot 1000 of these shots and nothing else till you complete them. They all must go in or the shot doesn't count towards the 1000. Try drawing the cb straight back too you in a straight line, hitting your tip as it comes to rest on the cloth. Make sure your cue is straight. If there's the slightest english(side spin) on the cb, it's not right. They'll still count but your goal is straight down and straight back.

You could do this now but with burning in something of such importance you need to make sure everything is right first. After you complete this task. Do on average 200 of these a week to maintain a straight stroke. Everything else is easy.

This is strickly my opinion and I'm on a lot of medication right now but I wouldn't steer you wrong. No pun intended. LOL

Regards,

C.C.~~You may ask Fran Crimi for some advice. She's in NYC and a Master BCA Instructor also. Regardless of up to date paperwork, once a Master, always a Master. Gosh, she's great. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Scott Lee
01-15-2003, 01:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jimbo:</font><hr> No need to begin at a close distance with this method and I have found it cures the "straight-in-shot" blues quickly and permanently.

Jimbo
<hr /></blockquote>

I'd agree, but I would still suggest a short distance between the two balls, at first. How far the OB is from the pocket is irrelevent.

9ballJr...Start with ONE foot between the CB and OB(and put the OB in the center of the table), and increase to 2, 3, and 4-5 feet (5' is a cue length). When you can consistently make the straight in shots that are four to five feet apart, you will have crossed the threshold, and will easily be able to make any length straight in shot...even a 9 footer! Be patient, and have your stroke checked out, to make sure your fundamentals are okay. The biggest thing in the pool stroke, like many other sports, is the timing.

Scott Lee

Wally_in_Cincy
01-15-2003, 08:04 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jimbo:</font><hr> If the shot is truly straight in <font color="red"> ignore the object ball and aim for the center of the pocket looking past the ball </font color> . After you strike the cue ball then look at the object ball and see where you strike it. No need to begin at a close distance with this method and I have found it cures the "straight-in-shot" blues quickly and permanently.

Jimbo
<hr /></blockquote>

That advice has been suggested before and it helped me with this shot. Others have suggested aiming at the base of the object ball. Any thoughts on that, Scott or Jimbo?

Fred Agnir
01-15-2003, 08:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> [That advice has been suggested before and it helped me with this shot. Others have suggested aiming at the base of the object ball. Any thoughts on that, Scott or Jimbo? <hr /></blockquote>
I'm not Scott or Jimbo, but the base or the top of the cueball are two good finite reference points to aim at, if a true center ball hit is desired. For a slight angle, I reference the point where the ball leaves the cloth, believe it or not.

Fred

01-15-2003, 09:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> [That advice has been suggested before and it helped me with this shot. Others have suggested aiming at the base of the object ball. Any thoughts on that, Scott or Jimbo? <hr /></blockquote>
I'm not Scott or Jimbo, but the base or the top of the cueball are two good finite reference points to aim at, if a true center ball hit is desired. For a slight angle, I reference the point where the ball leaves the cloth, believe it or not.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

To Wally and Fred,

I agree with Fred particularly his point about the slight angle aiming point, very useful IMO. I often use the top of the ball myself for straight in shots.

Jimbo

Scott Lee
01-15-2003, 12:46 PM
Wally...I'd definitely agree with Fred, on focusing on the bottom of the ball, as a point of aim, where it touches the cloth!

Scott

01-15-2003, 02:45 PM
According to my instructor, my fundamentals (stroke, stance, grip...) are excellent.

TonyM
01-15-2003, 03:14 PM
I was taught to use the base of the ball as the reference (cue ball AND object ball btw) for center ball. It is difficult to look at a spherical surface of a ball and "see" the center.

I see many of the older snooker players around here often raise the tip of their cue ABOVE the top of the cue ball to sight "top to top" for the same reason. Then they drop the tip down from there.

Hal Houle suggested sighting outer edge to outer edge for the same reasons.

I think that one of the explanations for many of the top nine ball players placing the tip of their cues down on the cloth in front of the cue ball for a draw or stun shot is so that they can better "see" the bottom to bottom sighting.

At least that's what some of them claim is their reasoning behind this practice.

Tony
-sights bottom to bottom....

silverbullet
01-15-2003, 05:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9 ball junior:</font><hr> I'm having a lot of trouble with long shots, especially the ones with no or little angle, almost straight in. The bad part is I'm not even missing consistently, so I can determine whats wrong. Balls are going everywhere! Any tips? <hr /></blockquote>

Two things:

I was making these with slight cut with ie but not with centerball. Some good players here suggested that ie could become a crutch and I should drop it and strive for accuracy

SO I practiced what other ccbers suggested to me, concentrating on stroke, and accuracy with the aim. This helped me quite a bit although I still miss. At least when I do miss I know why now, what I did wrong. For me it is allowing my brain to talk to me when I am down on the shot ie being distracted by my own negative self talk or being distracted by someone around me. Both things cause me to not line up or not focus my eyes right on the ob.

All I can say about is what I learned. I am not experienced enough to say what you are doing and feel everyone on here is better at pool than me although i am getting better every week... /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

did i say two things? sorry the other one just popped out of my head with the speed of a freight train. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

bw

silverbullet
01-15-2003, 05:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> 9 ball Junior,

Welcome to the board. First let me point out that, the straight-in shot is the hardest shot there is. That being said, I have two words of the best advice I would give my Mom, if she would let me get a word in edge wise. LOL

OK, get with RandyG' (Master Instructor) Pool School or try to catch Scott Lee ( taking his Masters course, as we speak) when he's out your way. It's in your mechanics without a doubt. This is a big area where a simple movement or placement will help you for life. These are BCA Qualified instructors and extremely versed in this subject. This is also going to cost money. What's money? It's nothing compared to the start it will give you in advancement and further returns to come your way. So, money is nothing.

Why do you need a Master BCA Instructor? You don't but you have access to them and they will be well worth the costs to you down the road. Be smart.


Regards,

C.C.~~You may ask Fran Crimi for some advice. She's in NYC and a Master BCA Instructor also. Regardless of up to date paperwork, once a Master, always a Master. Gosh, she's great. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Yep. depends on where you live. I am in the dc area, 4 hours from nyc. Randy is here with his pool school once a year. I took it last oct and am looking forward to taking a refresher sometime this summer. When I first took it I had just had a lesson on my stroke from scott about 5 weeks prior, so was real green. I still have sooo much to learn, but after several months of practice feel I will learn even more from the refresher. I really like randy gs pool school and it is worth every penny imo.

Even though I did not have a stroke, scott was very patient and taught me a lot.( scott is coming here again soon, horahh) Scott is wonderful and is very reasonable for the one on one and you get a tape you can watch over and over. I got so much out of his lesson that my brain hurt. At least rangys was spread over 3 days /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I havent found a local person but intend on sticking with these guys every year.

I just dont think a person can get too much instruction when they are a beginer or intermediate. I just love lessons and pool school and getting new things to practice on.

bw

01-16-2003, 03:54 AM
If your stroke is as good as your instructor says it is, it is just a matter of practice. I had the same problem before I dedicated whole practice sessions to shooting nothing but straight-ins. It was totally frustrating at first. But eventually I built on my successes. Now I can run two or three racks of straight-in setups without missing. It has also greatly improved my overall shotmaking since I can more accurately hit what I'm aiming at. As far a technique goes, set up the shots so the pocket, ob and cb are equal distances from each other and gradually spread them out as you improve. Start out at a diagonal to a corner pocket and later move the line more in parallel to the long rail. This is also a great way to warm up for league or tournament play to get your stroke working. Good luck . . .

TomBrooklyn
01-16-2003, 12:05 PM
I find that trying to make the cueball stop dead on the hit, in other words a stun shot, forces me to focus better for making straight in shots. Also, focusing on drawing the cue ball straight back or trying to follow the ob directly into the pocket are two other ways of narrowing down the focus. It takes a lot of focus and a dead on hit to get the cue ball to either stop or move straight forward or back. I can only do so many at a time, and then my neurons heat up and I have to switch to something else easier and let them cool down.