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NH_Steve
01-15-2003, 10:49 AM
Here I am still suffering from Derby City withdrawal, nearly a week after coming home /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif . Man I loved watching all that tremendous One Pocket, and chattin' strategy with whoever happened to be nearby -- often including damn knowledgeable people, BTW.

Anyway, it has me thinking about all the 'Axioms of One Pocket' I have heard (or read) over the years.
Here's a few examples from top players/commentators:

"Never shoot a shot you can lose with, but not win with." Grady Mathews
"When in a tough jam, look for something simple." Buddy Hall (I believe quoting an older player that taught him)
"The best threat is to have a ball up and a ball down (near your pocket)." Buddy Hall again
"When faced with a tough shot or a tough safety -- go with the shot, you have more to gain." Danny DiLiberto
'Always look at which side of the shot offers the most favorable margin of error, and favor that side.' Paraphrasing Grady Mathews
'Move balls that go for your opponent; leave balls that go for you.' Paraphrasing Freddy Bentivegna
'Know when to focus on the cueball, and when to focus on the object ball.' Again paraphrasing Grady

And one of my own:

Get on top of the balls to score; under the balls to defend

Please bring on your own -- or any you have learned from the One Pocket players you've had the chance to learn from...

Tom_In_Cincy
01-15-2003, 11:00 AM
Incardona recommends..

If there isn't anything else to do.. and no mater what you think you can do.. your opponent has all the advantages, hit them hard and hope for the best.. you never know.. it just might save you the game... scramble the table..

Paul_Mon
01-15-2003, 11:29 AM
This may sound overly simple:

"Always know which pocket is yours"

"Always know what the score is" (yours and your opponent)

HOWARD
01-15-2003, 11:40 AM
The two I remember are: 1) when face with a losing the game
becauses you are down four or five balls - play like lion -
take chances. When fact with a winning situation you are ahead by four or five balls play like a coward.

When desperate for a safety if nothing else looks good - leave him long.

Howard

Voodoo Daddy
01-15-2003, 02:36 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote NH_Steve:</font><hr>
"When faced with a tough shot or a tough safety -- go with the shot, you have more to gain." Danny DiLiberto
<hr /></blockquote>

I love it when I talk 1-hole with Danny. He almost always starts off with a situation and then say's something like; "Marcel Camp said to do this..." or "Sailor Barge woulda done this..." He truely is one of the last of a dying breed...and he is very easy to approach. Any of you that see him at tournaments should go up to him and thank him for the 50+ years he has been at the table.

NH_Steve
01-15-2003, 10:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Paul_Mon:</font><hr> This may sound overly simple:

"Always know which pocket is yours" <hr /></blockquote> Yeah, that's a very good point -- and one of the shiftiest moves I have ever heard of or seen, is to intentionally sleep your opponent shooting at the wrong hole (if they didn't make a very good shot), waiting till they shoot at it a second time and they leave a ball right near your pocket -- then you tell 'em, hey that's my pocket /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif .
'Course I wouldn't really do that LOL...

BillPorter
01-16-2003, 07:46 AM
One of the most basic axioms is to move balls up table (away from the players' pockets) when you are way ahead in the count. If you need only a couple of balls and your opponent needs four or more, you want the balls down near the head rail so that he has little chance of running out the balls he needs.

NH_Steve
01-17-2003, 07:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BillPorter:</font><hr> One of the most basic axioms is to move balls up table (away from the players' pockets) when you are way ahead in the count. If you need only a couple of balls and your opponent needs four or more, you want the balls down near the head rail so that he has little chance of running out the balls he needs. <hr /></blockquote>
That is of course, the ultimate 'playing the score' axiom. Grady has sometimes pointed out that if your opponent needs 1 ball, and you need 8, you've got a 256 to 1 advantage -- but that's based on each having even chances at scoring one ball at a time, which you are only going to approach if all the balls are uptable in a Varner 'wedge'! He also notes that there are times (with the same score), that the player that needs 8 might actually be favored, because all the balls are in play, with a threat to run out!

I'm not a math or statistics expert, but I think the principle is sound: If you have a lead and you reduce your opponent to scoring by mostly one ball at a time, you greatly increase your odds of winning; if you allow multiple balls in play and let them score in bunches, you greatly undermine your statistical advantage. The whole point of playing the score is to manage the odds in your favor!

CRATER59
01-17-2003, 08:43 AM
Greetings all.
I heard mention here of Sailor Barge. I have a friend here
in NYC who was an early acquaintance and pupil of Sailor Barge. He speaks of him highly and often. does anyone have any history or stories about him?

Thank you all in advance.

BillPorter
01-17-2003, 04:59 PM
Steve, Well said! Problem is, I know I violate this axiom at times. Usually to try a low percentage shot for a game winner. In too big a hurry to win the game.

HalSmith
02-05-2003, 09:10 AM
As told to me by a old master of the game "Not every shot has to be a great shot" and " some times shooter try to do too much with the shot". One Pocket Forever