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View Full Version : Fran....teaching question



SRpool
01-19-2003, 03:13 AM
I have some questions about teaching. what things should be covered for the beginner. i know establishing a stance and bridge. if anyone wants to throw in some ideas. i am going to start a junior league so there will be different ages to teach and i want to be sure and do it right. thanks.

9 Ball Girl
01-19-2003, 08:30 AM
Just a few http://www.smilies.org/basesmilies/1036946754.gif:

1. Make sure they follow through on their shots

2. Make sure they don't jump up after their shots

3. After they pocket each shot, make them stay down 'til the cue ball stops. That ought to teach them to stay down in the future.

4. Chalk up after each shot and show them the right way to chalk up (I hate to see chalk that fits like a hat on my tip)

Wendy~~Good luck! http://www.smilies.org/basesmilies/1036316054.gif

Sid_Vicious
01-19-2003, 09:36 AM
All those things are true "have to have" things without doubt. The beginning ritual I'd have with beginners would be the long(half table) straight in stop shot. It would bore teenagers, but that's where I would begin at least half an hour of each day if it were me teaching. It seems like such a simple shot to do, and yet to keep the CB in line on the stop consistently will ensure those fundamentals that you mentioned in your post is followed. It has to. The main problem I find in young, starting players is the enthusiasm to cut balls, bank balls, basically show off a little. Starting them with one definite "stay down and follow through" drill, day afer day for the beginning of the lesson is my advice, cuz the discipline of the stroke and is the whole key(IMO)...sid

Rich R.
01-19-2003, 09:40 AM
SRpool, I know you are capable of teaching anything beginning players may need to know, but I would suggest contacting all of the BCA certified instructors in your area. You may be able to get one or more of them involved in helping you with, at least, some basic instruction for this junior league. Although they would be, like you, donating their time for this basic instruction, they may get some business for themselves, when these junior players are ready for some advanced instruction.
A little extra help is always a good idea when embarking on such a task.

Popcorn
01-19-2003, 09:53 AM
I am going to give you what may seem like a strange answer. I would like to see them as they begin to learn pool, learn some of the history of the game. Maybe you could put together something that could give them a deeper appreciation as they begin. They should also learn about the equipment they are playing with and on, it's proper care and use. As you teach the new player, I think is most important that they understand why they are doing something and the theory behind it. It is so much easier to learn, when you understand the why. Just doing what you are told and not knowing why, is not learning. I also feel you should approach it as any teacher would and keep records on the students, their problems, and progress and have an actual curriculum for the student to follow once you have evaluated their skills, or lack of. I am really big on the learning part. Regardless of a players natural abilities, they can still know as much about the game as the player with more talent. You also have to require something from the student. They have to understand they have to practice, there are no magic formulas. Not all students will want to be a champion, some will just be happy to not embarrass themselves when playing with their friends. In any case though, you want to instill in them a love for the game that may result in them becoming a life long player no matter what level the choose to reach for. If you can do that, you will have left your mark and as a teacher, It doesn't get any better then that.

silverbullet
01-19-2003, 11:17 AM
I really like this post!!! imho, great thoughts on teaching beginers

bw

Sid_Vicious
01-19-2003, 11:33 AM
That's a good idea, yet I'll emphasize one thing. If these beginners are without any stroke at all, do not let them become Pool School students. I posted a while back on a girlfriend I sent to pool school, that story ended in her being told she was slowing the class up and she really needed to attend a pre-school class first. That lesson degraded her interest and lightened my wallet. I think SRpool is to be commended in this endeavor, and yes the BCA certified(free, donated time) instructions would be super. Otherwise I can't see any thing but positive in you or anybody with a real interest in these people, to teaching raw fundamental pool to true beginners..sid

landshark1002000
01-19-2003, 02:46 PM
Popcorn,

Thankyou so much for your insights. Your post is another reason why this forum is so valueable to the pool community.
I agree wholeheartedly that the love of the game is magnified by learning about it's history, it's craft, and it's legends.
This project is a very exciting idea and deserves our encouragement. Kids are the future of pool. I'd love to see the same thing here in Phoenix. My son would too.
A pool school and little league are a welcome addition to any community. And they're a great way for kids to find their way into pool, have fun with other kids, and enjoy a great game.

Fran Crimi
01-19-2003, 03:20 PM
Well, just try to think of how you'd teach an extra-terrestrial and you'll do fine. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I'll PM you. I have some questions for you first.

Fran

Rich R.
01-20-2003, 07:41 AM
Sid, I think it would be a simple task to seperate the junior players into groups. One group, who have never played pool at all, and another group, who may have played some or have tables at home.
Of course, some of the juniors may be able to skip these beginner classes altogether. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Fred Agnir
01-20-2003, 07:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I am going to give you what may seem like a strange answer. I would like to see them as they begin to learn pool, learn some of the history of the game. Maybe you could put together something that could give them a deeper appreciation as they begin. They should also learn about the equipment they are playing with and on, it's proper care and use. As you teach the new player, I think is most important that they understand why they are doing something and the theory behind it. It is so much easier to learn, when you understand the why. Just doing what you are told and not knowing why, is not learning. I also feel you should approach it as any teacher would and keep records on the students, their problems, and progress and have an actual curriculum for the student to follow once you have evaluated their skills, or lack of. I am really big on the learning part. Regardless of a players natural abilities, they can still know as much about the game as the player with more talent. You also have to require something from the student. They have to understand they have to practice, there are no magic formulas. Not all students will want to be a champion, some will just be happy to not embarrass themselves when playing with their friends. In any case though, you want to instill in them a love for the game that may result in them becoming a life long player no matter what level the choose to reach for. If you can do that, you will have left your mark and as a teacher, It doesn't get any better then that. <hr /></blockquote>

I hate posting a "me too" post, but I really felt compelled to say that this is a great post. Of course, that's because I agree with it 100%.

Fred &lt;~~~ me too

Jon from MN
01-20-2003, 07:57 AM
For someone who is just learning to play I teach them stroke {stance bridge straight stroke grip] then only center ball no english for 3 months so they learn how to pocket balls and it helps get there speed down and natural angles. next step stroke stroke stroke then when they think they have it down we review it some more. jmo Jon

landshark1002000
01-20-2003, 11:00 AM
SRpool,
bca_pool.com, or Carrie Benson @719-264-8300, can give you information on high school phys-ed programs in the school systems. A recent reprint article in Billiards Tabletalk says a successful program in California has taught pool classes to over 700 high school students in the last 3 years. Other schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Davenport, Iowa are also mentioned.
Good luck with your venture. Please keep us informed about your program.

randyg
01-20-2003, 03:50 PM
Sid: That's quite a statement concerning a pool school. What pool school did you finance for your girl friend. I would like to track that situation down. You know what they say about "one bad apple".....Thanks Sid, randyg

woody
01-20-2003, 09:50 PM
I don't think it could have been said any better than that. With a philosophy like the friends you play with and meet along the way are blessed.