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View Full Version : Monikers and nicknames



L.S. Dennis
01-19-2003, 11:10 AM
Can anyone tell me the origin of these things? I know pool has had them forever. Heck even in the small pool room in Redwood City California that I grew up in everybody had some kind of a nickname! The was "bone rack" Tessier, Shorty" the dry dog Dee the fish, and the list goes on and on. At 13 years old they even gave me one too which I won't go into here.

The qestion remains, where did the practice of all this start with relation to pool? The pro are loaded with them,
Larry Hubbard being "the ice man" Joe Balsis "the meat man" and so on. Some fit the personalities but some feel obviously forced!

Any ideas?

Popcorn
01-19-2003, 12:10 PM
A name is just a name, but a nickname is an identify, even a symbol of status. I know players that prefer their nicknames to their real names. I was just watching the movie Monte Walsh on T&T. There is a scene in the movie where the cowboys are telling each other their real names, all went by nicknames, the custom is common to all social groups. I think it can even be a way of showing respect. I don't like made up names like they do on TV. though. A name that is made up for the sake of making up a name, is not a real nickname.

heater451
01-19-2003, 01:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> . . .the custom is common to all social groups. I think it can even be a way of showing respect. I don't like made up names like they do on TV. though. A name that is made up for the sake of making up a name, is not a real nickname.<hr /></blockquote>I argree that it is common, but was was pondering the literal "NICK"-name (as in 'cutting'), and checked the denotation of the word:

A descriptive name added to or replacing the actual name of a person, place, or thing.
A familiar or shortened form of a proper name.
A name given in contempt, derision, or sportive familiarity; a familiar or an opprobrious appellation.
I believe that more nicknames fall under #2 (the "nick" (cut) part for shortening--ex., Robert to Bob). However, many originate as a type of 'friendly-insult', as in #3, when they are intended to cause someone to wince inwardly when they hear their nickname (i.e., some nicknames definitely aren't respectful).

A "moniker" is just another name for a personal/familiar name, or nickname. . . .


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L.S. Dennis
01-19-2003, 01:14 PM
All interesting stuff, but can we more specific to "pool" nicknames and the folklore associated this?

01-19-2003, 01:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote L.S. Dennis:</font><hr> All interesting stuff, but can we more specific to "pool" nicknames and the folklore associated this? <hr /></blockquote>

I imagine that modern day pool became popular long after nicknames were being used. That being the case I doubt there is any particular provenance associated to pool nicknames that would not be attributable to the initial usage of nicknames in general.

Jimbo

NH_Steve
01-20-2003, 07:13 AM
As I am sure you have noticed, traditional pool halls have a very strong 'subculture', an ideal cauldron of jargon from which not only nicknames flourish, but also lots of other localized slang. Not to mention all the typical pool slang that is common language from one room to another.

My favorite local saying from the room I grew up in?

Getting 'milked at the seams'
(meaning someone is really putting the screws to you)

My favorite nickname from the same room?
'Skunion'
(Kind of a cross between skunk &amp; onion -- get the picture? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif )

ps No, it wasn't my nickname, thank bejeesus