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Kato
01-28-2003, 08:06 AM
Getting up the desire to begin reading them. As an avid reader with a nice little start up library (about 500 books, hard and soft cover not including refrence books) when Easton Press came out with this spectacular offer. Purchase the Greatest 100 Books Ever Written!!!!!!!! How could I turn it down? I asked Katy which books I should buy (you don't have to buy them all) and the ones she wanted I'd never heard of so I just bought them all!!!!!! I get 1 per month. Here's the problem: I have to read them. So far I've got 2, Moby Dick (I already read the comic) and Great Expectations. How do you pump yourself up to read Great Expectations? Is it like getting pumped up to play 1 pocket or is it harder than that, like getting pumped up to play Hopscotch?

Kato

Vapros
01-28-2003, 08:32 AM
Kato, it sounds like you have signed up for some tough love, from yourself. If you have assigned yourself the task of reading these books, but don't look forward to it, it's gonna be like digging a real long ditch. I have read a lot of books, but few of them would appear on the list of 100 best books.

There will be some on the list that you really look forward to. Read those and then think about the others. I can't imagine spending my spare time on an unhappy chore - even if it might be good for me. Life is too short. You can be well-read without going through the whole collection.

Gayle in MD
01-28-2003, 08:47 AM
Hi Kato,
I also love to read. It's interesting how often something comes up in life that will make you remember a book you read long ago, and you find yourself pulling it out once again for another read. I think it is good for the soul to dicipline yourself when it comes to your reading, not to leave out your pleasure reads, but to also continue to read those great works which help you to remember how beautiful language really can be. Great literature, beautiful prose, and timeless lessons. As for the inspiration, try some Mozart, or Chopin' softly in the background. Always puts me in the mood for some serious reading.
Happy reading,
Gayle in Md.

Kato
01-28-2003, 09:12 AM
That's it Gayle, that's why I did it. Because I'd like to read the classics and not just to say I did it. I think the discipline is the key.

Kato

Voodoo Daddy
01-28-2003, 09:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Kato:</font><hr> Is it like getting pumped up to play 1 pocket or is it harder than that? Kato <hr /></blockquote>

I'm begining to hate you again... /ccboard/images/graemlins/mad.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Kato
01-28-2003, 10:01 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif Yeah, I knew that would get under your skin a little. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif You know you'll always be my big brother even if you do hate me a little more than most people.

Kato~~~Steve's little, less intimidating brother.

MikeM
01-28-2003, 10:11 AM
RJ,

Good for you! A man can always use MORE culture in his life.

Read a book by James Michener called "The Novel". It's not a particulary great book by itself but it does introduce you to the worlds of publishing and literature. One of the characters is shown a roadmap for a classical education, which gives some insight into great literature.

After reading that book I started a journey similar to yours into "the Greatest Books of All Time". I've never regretted it. If you can't find it let me know I have an extra copy.

Call me any time you want to talk books. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Mike

mickey2
01-28-2003, 10:11 AM
Just some books which come to my mind:
Clockwork Orange
Animal Farm
Brave New World
The Jungle Book
Catcher in the ray
Siddhartha // still in my reading queue
The Trial
War and Peace // still in my reading queue

Gayle in MD
01-28-2003, 10:23 AM
Yes RJ, I agree. My books have always been among my prized possessions. Maybe we should start a CCB book club, lol. Emily Dickinson and Jane Austin are among my favorites. I think you have to love words, and the economy of their use, in order to fully appreciate the enrichment available to those who read for the purpose of self-enrichment. Some of my happiest times were in the simple act of reading the classics to my daughter. Now I am sharing these same experiences with my grand-daughter, and loving every minute of it. But she still likes the stories I make up for her, and often as I reach for a book to read to her, she will say, "No Grand-ma-ma, tell me a story out of your mouth!" LOL. Enjoy, enjoy, my friend...
Gayle in Md. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Kato
01-28-2003, 11:20 AM
Here is the list (If you care):

100 Greatest Books Ever Written

Title Author

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Twain
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Conan Doyle
The Aeneid Virgil
Aesop’s Fables Aesop
Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Carroll
The Analects of Confucius Confucius
Animal Farm Orwell
Anna Karenina Tolstoy
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin Franklin
Beowulf Anonymous
Billy Budd Melville
Brave New World Huxley
The Brothers Karamazov Dostoevsky
Robert Browning-Collected Poems Browning, R.
Candide Voltaire
The Canterbury Tales Chaucer
The Cherry Orchard/The Three Sisters Chekhov
The Comedies Shakespeare
The Confessions of St. Augustine St.Augustine
The Count of Monte Cristo Dumas
Crime and Punishment Dostoevsky
Cyrano de Bergerac Rostand
David Copperfield Dickens
The Decameron Boccaccio
Emily Dickinson Dickinson
The Divine Comedy Dante
Don Quixote Cervantes
Dracula Stoker
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Stevenson
The Essays Emerson
A Farewell to Arms Hemingway
Fathers and Sons Turgenev
Faust Goethe
The Federalist Papers Hamilton, et al
Frankenstein Shelley
Robert Frost-Collected Poems Frost
Great Expectations Dickens
Grimm’s Fairy Tales Grimm
Gulliver’s Travels Swift
Heart of Darkness Conrad
The Histories Shakespeare
The History of Early Rome Livy


The Hunchback of Notre Dame Hugo
The Iliad Homer
Ivanhoe Scott
Jane Eyre Bronte, C.
The Jungle Books Kipling
John Keats-Collected Poems Keats
Lady Chatterley’s Lover Lawrence
The Last of the Mohicans Cooper
Leaves of Grass Whitman
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow &amp; Other Stories Irving
Les Miserables Hugo
Little Women Alcott
Lord Jim Conrad
Madame Bovary Flaubert
Moby Dick Melville
The Necklace and Other Tales Maupassant
The Odyssey Homer
Oedipus the King Sophocles
Of Mice and Men Steinbeck
On the Origin of Species Darwin
Paradise Lost Milton
The Picture of Dorian Gray Wilde
The Pilgrims Progress Bunyan
Politics/The Poetics Aristotle
The Portrait of a Lady James
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Joyce
Pride and Prejudice Austen
The Prince Machiavelli
Pygmalion/Candida Shaw
The Red and the Black Stendhal
The Republic Plato
The Rights of Man Paine
Robinson Crusoe Defoe
The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam Khayyam
The Scarlet Letter Hawthorne
The Sea Wolf London
She Stoops to Conquer Goldsmith
Silas Marner Eliot
The Sound and the Fury Faulkner
A Tale of Two Cities Dickens
Tales from the Arabian Nights Burton
Tales of Mystery and Imagination Poe
The Talisman Scott
Tess of the d’Urbervilles Hardy
The Three Musketeers Dumas
The Time Machine Wells
Tom Jones Fielding The Tragedies Shakespeare
Treasure Island Stevenson
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Verne
Uncle Tom’s Cabin Stowe
Vanity Fair Thackeray
Walden Thoreau
War and Peace Tolstoy
The Way of All Flesh Butler
Wuthering Heights Bronte, E.
William Butler Yeats-Collected Poems Yeats

Rich R.
01-28-2003, 11:33 AM
Kato, I think it is great that you are setting out to read all of these "classic" books. It is certainly a monumental undertaking. Hopefully, when you finish, we can get together and you can tell me all about them. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I've read a few on the list, parts of others.
Some were very good, others I would opt for a route canal. /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif
Most, I would prefer to see the movie. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Kato
01-28-2003, 11:39 AM
Thanks for the info Mike. I'll look into it.

Coming soon to ABC: Talk to Mike Mason about the Classics (Hopefully right before Alias) /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

Kato

Kato
01-28-2003, 11:43 AM
I read my little cousins and nieces my favorite classics of my collection: Dr. Suess.

Kato~~~one fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish. Does anybody really need Twain when you've got Bartholomew and the Obleck?

nAz
01-28-2003, 12:12 PM
Hmm i did'nt see the "Hitchhikers Guide To The Univers Trilogy" in that list!
well atleast there is one book by Mark Twain in that list. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Fred Agnir
01-28-2003, 12:23 PM
What? No Vonnegut?

When last I went to Barnes &amp; Noble, there were at least two publishers that were printing hard covers of many (all) of these classics for $6.99. Relatively cheap way to get some classics in.

Fred &lt;~~~ oh, yeah... what? No Lord of The Flies?

Kato
01-28-2003, 12:28 PM
The Baseball Encyclopedia is also not on the list. Somewhat disappointing I assure you.

Kato

Fred Agnir
01-28-2003, 12:32 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mickey2:</font><hr> Siddhartha // still in my reading queue
<hr /></blockquote>
Obscure Herman Hesse reference.

The first Hesse book I read was Demian. If you've seen Fight Club, Hesse's Demian was the inspiration for sure.

It's odd that I recall most of that book from decades ago, but his well known Steppenwolf, I can't remember a thing about it, though I read it right after I read Demian.

Fred

Kato
01-28-2003, 12:35 PM
I actually got the complete works of Poe and Sherlock Holmes from Barnes and Noble. $10.00 I think. These are nicer though. I purchased those about 3 years ago. I've been back a couple of times, picked up an autographed copy of Steve Alten's, The Meg (good fiction) and I've picked up 1 or 2 other autographed copies of books there (in with the general population. I find these because I never take the book out front as the spines are sometimes broken and the pages are disheveled and I'm completely nuerotic about my books).

Borders to me has a better selection and better coffee. I'm a Borders guy, have a Borders Platnium Visa that earns me Border's Dollars. $10 this month. Did I mention their Peruvian blended coffee? Unbelievable.

Kato

Karatemom
01-28-2003, 12:50 PM
Don't get fooled. Great Expectations is a wonderful book. It's been a while since I've read it, like 20 years, but I remember it keeping my interest very easily. It might be hard to get started, but it is one you will definitely want to finish.

Heide ~ big Stephen King fan!!!

Voodoo Daddy
01-28-2003, 01:06 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Kato:</font><hr> Here is the list (If you care):

100 Greatest Books Ever Written

Title Author

The Hunchback of Notre Dame Hugo
<hr /></blockquote>

Notice there isnt "The Hunchback of University of Miami"...HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Voodoo~~~far from a literary man but has read Hawthorne

Kato
01-28-2003, 01:06 PM
I like old King. Cujo, The Shining, Christine, Pet Cemetery. ect. He started to get stale but The Tommyknocker's was a great book.

Kato~~~Big John Sanford fan.

TomBrooklyn
01-28-2003, 02:30 PM
I've read nine of the books on your list and enjoyed them a lot, but mostly I read them a long time ago.. Mostly now I just catch the movie version. Lol.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
Aesop’s Fables
Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
The Canterbury Tales
Don Quixote
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow &amp; Other Stories
Moby Dick
Robinson Crusoe

Enjoy. What a fine adventure reading a good novel is.

Kato
01-28-2003, 02:39 PM
Dig Alert, Dig Alert, Dig Alert. Somebody get the knife out of my back. Steve is at it again.

Kato~~~starting to get used to my mean big brother.

Kato
01-28-2003, 02:42 PM
Animal Farm
Moby Dick
Frankenstien
Of Mice and Men
The Sea Wolf
A Tale of Two Cities.
Sherlock Holmes but this might be different.

Kato~~~sadly, no crime fighting hunting down the bad guys using massive amounts of technology and DNA testing from a single leaf stories here.

snipershot
01-28-2003, 03:28 PM
I think getting pumped up to read a book is like getting pumped up to visit the in-laws, you must be an avid reader if you ordered all 100 books though.

Good luck,
Snipershot

Karatemom
01-28-2003, 04:07 PM
One of his best books, I think, is Misery. Really good reading. I started on Hearts in Atlantis, but haven't finished it. It's a little too slow for me.

One of my most favorite books is Dante's Inferno. Incredible book!!! It's a very deep, hard to follow book, but it's probably the best book I've ever read.

Heide

9 Ball Girl
01-28-2003, 04:22 PM
Of the books on your list, I've read:

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Carroll
Dracula Stoker
Robert Frost-Collected Poems Frost
The Iliad Homer
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow &amp; Other Stories Irving
Moby Dick Melville
The Odyssey Homer
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Verne
Uncle Tom's Cabin Stowe

Good reads!!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran Crimi
01-28-2003, 04:38 PM
Kato, I think it's a great idea! Maybe you could start with one that you may be a little curious about to get you going. How about Leaves of Grass? LOL

Fran ~~ always wondered why Bill shared that book with Monica.

Stretch
01-28-2003, 05:48 PM
What! No Louis L'Amour!? LOL I'd have about as much chance of finnishing your list as i would Marrying that 18 year old Atheanna whatever Onasis and her 3 billion dollar inheritence. St ~~If your gonna dream, dream big.~~

PS She still hasn't returned any of my calls, cain't understand, just cain't.

Leviathan
01-28-2003, 06:16 PM
Gayle: I never expected to see Jane Austen's name mentioned in a CCB post. Thanks: you've made my day.--Duke Mantee

Leviathan
01-28-2003, 06:56 PM
Greetings, Kato.

If you feel that you should read a book you don't want to read, you could try bribing yourself with performance incentives. For example, you could award yourself three hot wings, a bottle of Negra Modelo, and a jelly doughnut each time you finish five pages of the book in question. (A similar system of rewards helped me quit smoking 20 years ago!)

Mens sana in corpore sano, right?--D.M.

TomBrooklyn
01-28-2003, 09:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> you could award yourself three hot wings, a bottle of Negra Modelo, and a jelly doughnut each time you finish five pages of the book in question.<hr /></blockquote>Every 5 pages? You must read very slowly or get very fat!

Kato
01-29-2003, 07:13 AM
I'd say I'm a reading junkie. If I don't get in at least 3 hours per day I get jumpy.

Kato~~~many a night spent reading myself to sleep.

Kato
01-29-2003, 07:16 AM
That book is not among the 100 Heide but it is on my list of books to read. I just got $20 in Borders gift certificates. Think I'll buy it this weekend.

Kato

Kato
01-29-2003, 07:18 AM
I actually started Moby Dick last night. Once I got used to the writing it was fine.

Kato~~~has read the King James version of the Bible cover to cover so "Call me Ishmael" isn't that bad.

HOWARD
01-29-2003, 03:03 PM
Kato,

The board seems to be having a good time with this thread.
My theory is, the 100 greatest... - who says? and by what authority were they made the GOD of what the best for us to read?

My rule is I start a book if find it boring - I quit it like I am in a bad game and gave to much weight.

Does not mean I disparage all the books on the list. Just the way I think about books.

Remember the time you spend can not be earn back later.

Lots of luck,

Howard

Kato
01-29-2003, 03:14 PM
Actually Howard you're right. Who is to say what is what? The people I've asked that know alot more than me seem to believe that the list is solid and comprehensive. Of course there are works omitted since they only picked 100. I'm sure the number could have easily been 1,000.

Kato

Fred Agnir
01-29-2003, 03:17 PM
Title Author
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Twain
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Conan Doyle
Aesop’s Fables Aesop
Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Carroll
Animal Farm Orwell
Beowulf Anonymous
Brave New World Huxley
Candide Voltaire
The Canterbury Tales Chaucer
The Cherry Orchard/The Three Sisters Chekhov
Cyrano de Bergerac Rostand
Don Quixote Cervantes
A Farewell to Arms Hemingway
Frankenstein Shelley
Robert Frost-Collected Poems Frost
Grimm’s Fairy Tales Grimm
Gulliver’s Travels Swift
Heart of Darkness Conrad
Ivanhoe Scott
Jane Eyre Bronte, C.
The Jungle Books Kipling
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow &amp; Other Stories Irving
Little Women Alcott
Moby Dick Melville
Oedipus the King Sophocles
Of Mice and Men Steinbeck
The Scarlet Letter Hawthorne
Tales from the Arabian Nights Burton
Tales of Mystery and Imagination Poe
Tess of the d’Urbervilles Hardy
The Time Machine Wells
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Verne


Some of these with several short stories or poems, I'm sure I haven't read each. Oddly enough, all I remember out of many of them is that I was forced to read them in high school. Like that friggin' Canterbury Tales.

Fred &lt;~~~ how does Lord of the Rings not make this list?

Fred Agnir
01-29-2003, 03:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Karatemom:</font><hr> One of his best books, I think, is Misery. Really good reading. I started on Hearts in Atlantis, but haven't finished it. It's a little too slow for me. <hr /></blockquote>
I really liked Hearts in Atlantis, especially the hot sex scenes.

I also really liked Bag of Bones, and The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon. They were so unlike previous King horror novels which often left the reader thinking that King whimped out in attempt to find endings.

Fred

Kato
01-29-2003, 03:21 PM
I tried to read The Two Towers many years ago and it made my brain bleed. My girlfriend is a huge fan and will be receiving from me the trilogy for her birthday. She (and you as well Fred) think that it's a complete masterpiece.

The only book or series of books that I wish made it was The Chronicles of Narnia of which I have a beautiful illustrated hardcover.

Kato

Kato
01-29-2003, 03:33 PM
I have The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, is it any good?

Kato

9 Ball Girl
01-29-2003, 04:39 PM
I have that book and I enjoyed it. What I find from a lot of King's books is that they start out slow but then BOOM!, they start to get ya. I tell you what I didn't like by him and that was From A Buick 8. I wasn't expecting anything like Christine but Buick 8 really sucked!

I am a HUGE Stephen King fan as 95% of my library are horror books. My favorite by him is the Shining and then Salem's Lot. Spooky stuff man!

Wendy~~also likes Dean Koontz and Bentley Little

Karatemom
01-29-2003, 07:21 PM
Very good. Not like his other books at all. Not much horror, but definitely can't-set-it-down. You'll like it.

Heide

eg8r
01-30-2003, 07:21 AM
Hey Kato you are probably right, I am sure they missed some...but if they include a large quantity then you could not call them the "greatest". A list of about a 1000 could be called...."Good reading selection" or something like that (I am not very creative). /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Now that my sports teams have lost everything this year I have spent more time reading myself.

eg8r

Kato
01-30-2003, 07:26 AM
Ok Heide, I'll take your word for it. It's a small book so I'll do it in an evening.

Kato

Kato
01-30-2003, 07:35 AM
You've got that right Eg. 1000 books would be too expensive for me to swallow anyway /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gifand at 1 per month it would take me over 83 years to get them all. I would be 114 years old and probably drooling quite a bit. For some reason I think Crime and Punishment would be a tough read.

Kato

Paul_Mon
01-30-2003, 11:01 AM
One of my all time favorite King books is the "Talisman" which he co-wrote with Peter Straub. It reminded me of when I read Tom Sawyer at the age of 9. I didn't want the book to end. I was excited when King/Straub wrote "Black House" the sequel to the Talisman but it didn't evoke the same emotions in me.

Paul Mon~~~~~woof woof, gotta love wolfie

Gayle in MD
01-30-2003, 11:32 AM
Hi Fran, are you speaking of "Leaves Of Grass" which was written by Issak Dennisen? Don't know if it is the same book...
Gayle in Md. also reading Harry Potter, LOL.

WaltVA
01-30-2003, 02:20 PM
Gayle - Fran was probably referencing "Leaves of Grass" by Walt Whitman; created quite a stir when first published, I think.

Could you be thinking of Isak Dinesen's (aka Karen Blixen) "Shadows on the Grass"? (She is much better known for "Out of Africa.")

Walt in VA

Gayle in MD
01-30-2003, 06:06 PM
Oh yes, Walt, and thanks for the spelling correction. I love her writing, and "Out Of Africa" is one of my favorite movies. Have read most everything she has written. Fran's post makes sense now, LOL.
Gayle in Md....old brains get rattled now and then, LOL... /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif