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View Full Version : new here just wanted to put some input in



01-31-2003, 03:18 AM
I have played pool for a long time now.I was looking over some of the post and have some different opinons.I consider my self to be a pretty decent pool player.all the post on cues i have a different opinion i shoot with a schon cue i read where somone said don't waste your money the stick does have alot to do with how you shoot.mostly the tip i agree with that but,every stick is weighted different how the weight of the stick is balanced is very important.you will have to make your own opinion of what you like.the pros may be able to beat you with a broom stick but it never hurts to have an edge.also some newbie to pool said there is no differce between 19 and 20oz well just to let you know there is a big difference i shoot with a 19.5 a 19 is just to light a 20 is to heavy and i can tell the difference with one hit.

Rich R.
01-31-2003, 06:43 AM
Poolshark, don't take any one post about equipment too seriously. There are as many opinions about equipment as there are posters on the CCB.
You refer to one poster saying that the stick wasn't too important. But if you search the posts for the last week or two, there was a thread that asked what everyone had in there case. Almost every one responding had at least one valuable custom cue in there case. That should tell you something. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Alfie
01-31-2003, 01:08 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> Almost every one responding had at least one valuable custom cue in there case. That should tell you something. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote> Old myths die hard.

The responders think a cue is more than just a tool.

The responders are affluent enough to buy one.

Rich R.
01-31-2003, 01:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alfie:</font><hr> Old myths die hard.

The responders think a cue is more than just a tool.

The responders are affluent enough to buy one. <hr /></blockquote>
A cue, alone, will not make you play better, but why limit your abilities by using a poor quality cue.
Try one, you may like one.

Alfie
01-31-2003, 02:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> A cue, alone, will not make you play better, but why limit your abilities by using a poor quality cue. <hr /></blockquote> You do not have to have a "valuable custom cue" to have a good quality cue.

Rich R.
02-01-2003, 09:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> A cue, alone, will not make you play better, but why limit your abilities by using a poor quality cue. <hr /></blockquote>
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alfie:</font><hr> You do not have to have a "valuable custom cue" to have a good quality cue. <hr /></blockquote>
Alfie, your reading more into my posts than I am writing.
I consider a valuable cue, to be one of high quality, not necessarily one with a lot of eye candy in it.
By custom, I only mean that a cue was made for you and you alone. You got to pick out the woods used, the shaft size and the weight, etc.

I'm sure some here have very fancy cues and some have very plain cues. Using my definitions of valuable and custom, those terms could apply to all.

You seem to have a hang up about some one spending a little money for a cue. May I suggest that every one on the CCB spends money on some things that are not necessities. For some, it may be gambling, alcohol, cigarettes, nice cars, etc. Others it may be cue sticks. It doesn't make any one a bad person.

Alfie
02-01-2003, 04:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> A cue, alone, will not make you play better, but why limit your abilities by using a poor quality cue. <hr /></blockquote>
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alfie:</font><hr> You do not have to have a "valuable custom cue" to have a good quality cue. <hr /></blockquote>
Alfie, your reading more into my posts than I am writing.
I consider a valuable cue, to be one of high quality, not necessarily one with a lot of eye candy in it.
By custom, I only mean that a cue was made for you and you alone. You got to pick out the woods used, the shaft size and the weight, etc.

I'm sure some here have very fancy cues and some have very plain cues. Using my definitions of valuable and custom, those terms could apply to all.

You seem to have a hang up about some one spending a little money for a cue. May I suggest that every one on the CCB spends money on some things that are not necessities. For some, it may be gambling, alcohol, cigarettes, nice cars, etc. Others it may be cue sticks. It doesn't make any one a bad person. <hr /></blockquote>And I believe you are reading too much into my words. I also know what a "valuable custom cue" means no matter how you try to spin it now. I will simply restate- you do not have to have a "valuable custom cue" to have a good quality cue (just in case you were implying that you do).

Rich R.
02-02-2003, 08:35 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alfie:</font><hr> And I believe you are reading too much into my words. I also know what a "valuable custom cue" means no matter how you try to spin it now. I will simply restate- you do not have to have a "valuable custom cue" to have a good quality cue (just in case you were implying the opposite.) <hr /></blockquote>
Alfie, regardless of what you think, I am not trying to "spin" anything. I have personally seen good players run racks with broom handles, but I wouldn't call that a "valuable custom cue." I also don't think you need a cue loaded with many inlays to play well. I just believe, if possible, players should have good quality cues.
We may actually have some similar views, although, from your posts, it is hard to tell for sure. Where we may differ is in our definitions of "valuable high quality" cues. I know what my definition is, but you seem to want to make much more out of it than it is. Please keep in mind, by "valuable", I don't necessarily mean "high priced". That may be your definition, buy not mine. In addition, "high priced" is a relative term and will differ for everyone.
At that, I will leave it alone and just agree that we disagree.

Sid_Vicious
02-02-2003, 09:30 AM
I'm in both camps on this stick issue. I personally play better in the beginning of ownership of most any new cue, and recently bought into what's supposed to be the top of McDermott's line and my game is making me extremely happy at the moment. Yet, I purchased an $80 Mali a while back for a girlfriend just picking up the sport and that cue worked for me wonderfully, as does several other well built production cues, Cuetech being one.

I'll tell you this though, it's all in the player's head once you cross the line of quality and fancy. I'm one who can pick up a mega buck cue, gently cradle it and admire it, and shoot precision pool from the get-go. It doesn't last forever, but my mind and body "feels" it should and it just does. Some other players would take this cue, slam a break shot, lay in it the corner where it could get bumped, and maybe never get what I get from it. If you really appreciate the details of a fine cue, I feel you will play up to, and possibly beyond your own potential, it's just that simple. If you aren't intrigued with quality cues, then a house cue will play as well as a $2500 cue.

As far as the weight issues, I always ask for 19.5 oz cues. I'll say this, a variance of cues can weigh 19.5 and some will feel lighter or heavier, depending on the balance. That's the truth...sid

Alfie
02-03-2003, 03:07 PM
Rich spins on:
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> Alfie, regardless of what you think, I am not trying to "spin" anything. I have personally seen good players run racks with broom handles, but I wouldn't call that a "valuable custom cue." I also don't think you need a cue loaded with many inlays to play well. I just believe, if possible, players should have good quality cues.
We may actually have some similar views, although, from your posts, it is hard to tell for sure. Where we may differ is in our definitions of "valuable high quality" cues. I know what my definition is, but you seem to want to make much more out of it than it is. Please keep in mind, by "valuable", I don't necessarily mean "high priced". That may be your definition, buy not mine. In addition, "high priced" is a relative term and will differ for everyone.
At that, I will leave it alone and just agree that we disagree. <hr /></blockquote>You do not have to have a "valuable custom cue" to have a good quality cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

snipershot
02-03-2003, 06:56 PM
Those are just everyone's varied opinions, their not rating the cues their just explaining how they feel about it. Most of us also realize the difference between a 19 and a 19.5.

HalSmith
02-03-2003, 07:08 PM
I agree that you don't have to have a high priced cue to shoot good. I must have a cue that I like the way the hit feels. I have had entry level cues such as a Mali which hits great for a production cue. I also have a Shon which has a very nice hit and is pretty, I have recently bought a Jerry Olivier custom cues that is beautiful and it hits great too. All that said as long as you like the hit all the other stuff is just show to make you feel good. Harold Smith

tateuts
02-03-2003, 09:36 PM
Yea, verily the selection of ones stick is but a reflection of the very fibre of ones pool-shooting self. This would explain why mine is cheap and warped.