PDA

View Full Version : Use of Legs on the Break



bigbro6060
02-12-2003, 10:33 PM
Overall i must say i'm pretty happy with my break, i do practice it a lot. I don't really use my legs much on my break but recently i have been experimenting exploding into the shot with my legs. My earlier feedback is that it is indeed possible to generate more power but your timing has to be spot on. Breaking like this, once in every say 4 or 5 breaks the whitey flies off the table, due to me stuffing up the timing and coordination of body parts and hitting the whitey too low. I hardly ever have whitey fly on my normal break. I see the use of legs in the pool break like the use of legs in the tennis serve. You aren't jumping into to the break, you are reaching forward dynamically and that is what causes either your back leg to flip up or even both legs to be off the ground. It's the same with the tennis serve, you don't jump into the serve, you reach up to the ball and that takes you off the ground

I'm sure with much more practice i will be able to add more control to the power but at this point in time i don't feel in control enough of the hit

has anyone else gone through this when developing a full body power break ?

02-12-2003, 11:27 PM
I've been a tennis player for 24 years, and I often compare the break in pool to the serve. I've seen several posts recently about the "power break", and read all the opinions on generating cue speed with your body. I recall from an old tennis book how one of the great Aussies (I forget which one) was able to hit serves well in excess of 100 MPH without moving his feet at all. It was all done with timing, shoulder rotation, and a loose wrist. I break much better when I keep my entire body fairly still, and I get plenty of power. Watch Mizerak break. The guy can break with as much power as anyone (ok, maybe not Busta) and he just does it with his stroke...almost no body movement. I think using your body is fine, but only if it works FOR YOU. I have a hard time keeping my head still (which is necessary on any pool shot) if my body is moving. Practice, experiment, and do what works for you. I personally feel that a break stroke executed without any unnecessary body motion will be more consistent in the long run (and easier to execute when I get older). And one other tennis analogy: to generate power on the serve, many instructors teach the server to tuck your off arm into your stomach or side as you swing up and forward at the ball. Tucking the off arm stops the rotation of the shoulders so your swinging arm can then snap through with greater speed. I find if I lock my bridge shoulder down on the break, I'm able to drive the cue forward with my stroking arm with greater speed and accuracy. This made a huge difference in my break.

bigbro6060
02-12-2003, 11:48 PM
thanx for your reply Banker mate, i'm always interested in discussion and info on biomechanics of techniques etc

Looking at Busty's break, he gets his whole body moving down the line of the shot, it's really a beautiful stroke.

i do agree that it's not necessary to use every single building block of power on the break. The more blocks you use, the more practice and the better timing you need.

snipershot
02-13-2003, 12:12 AM
I don't really use my legs on my break, I do however position them quite a ways back from the table, this puts more of my weight from my upper body into the break and generates quite a bit more power.

bigbro6060
02-13-2003, 05:07 PM
no other opinions ?

NBC-BOB
02-14-2003, 07:58 AM
Sounds to me like you were breaking ok using your normal break and not losing control of the cueball.I think if you have the cueball flying off the table when you try this new method, your breaking to hard and losing control of the cueball.I've noticed when watching the women on ESPN that a lot of them, seem to have reduce the power and maintain the control!I think thats the way to break!

Sid_Vicious
02-14-2003, 08:14 AM
I don't use my legs. It frustrated an instructor(money player I paid time to once) that I never would adopt that into my breaks, but just like you are noticing, the CB many times ends on the carpet, plus I'm making 1-2 balls(when my break is working) on my breaks WITH control by taking some off of the killer attitude. You watch pool on TV these days and you will notice fewer "Archers and Stricklands" and more of the "make a ball and control whitie" breakers. Just my 2c.

As a recent example, I decided to break with my new pride and joy instead of getting the break stick, so being a friendly game, I under stroked with less speed. I made 2 balls and rolled the nine to the jaws of a corner pocket. I broke the second rack the same way, and again made 2 balls and rolled the 9 close to the same hole. What's that tell you about control vs hammer???.sid

L.S. Dennis
02-14-2003, 11:20 AM
Sid, I thourghly agree with you. I think the day of the power break in nineball is over or about to be over. Control of the cue ball is paramount if you have any intention of stringing racks together, therefore breaks like Archer's or Strickland's are quickly fading into the past. I think this was done largely in part by the breaks and results performed by Corey Deuel who seemes to have paved the way of the softer and more control break in recent times.

Control beats power everytime!

Fran Crimi
02-14-2003, 11:49 AM
Hi Dennis,

Obviously the Sardo rack contributed to the softer controlled break. It's not as if players weren't aware of the controlled break over the years. They knew all about it. Players have been experimenting with breaking since day one. But what they've found out is that more often than not, with a REGULAR rack, a power break will pocket one or more balls more often than a softer more controlled break.

Remember Little David? He jumped clear out of his socks when he broke, totally let the cue ball fly and still won tournament after tournament. It didn't seem all that important to control the cue ball on the break, at least not for him. After all, do we really, honestly know what the outcome of a break is going to be, even if we DO try to control the rock?

Fran

L.S. Dennis
02-14-2003, 01:57 PM
Hi Fran,

I know that Strickland Archer or David Howard are no strangers to stringing racks together with their power breaks. I think you put your finger on it when you said Little David let the cue ball fly with that hard break. I know people have been experimenting with all kinds of breaks from day one, and every table plays differently. I still maintain on balance I would opt for a more controlled break and suffer the consequences or benifits of it rather than cranking up and letting the cue ball go.

On the other hand who am I to argue with Archer who just a few years ago ran 13 and out on Bustamante with that big break!

02-14-2003, 04:03 PM
Hi Fran, I enjoy your columns in BD.

I've found over the years that control beats power. By that I mean using as much power as you CAN control, i.e. for me about 83% of my maximum, if all is well straight and true on the stroke.

Truly aiming at the center of the head ball, from any break position behind the head string, trying for a pristine center ball hit on the cue, with chin down on the cue to maximize aiming over a more erect stance allowing a more powerful but less controlled break hit, works better for me at all speeds. The cue rebounds back nicely to center table, the balls spread well, no more than 20%(maybe fudging here) of the time will an unlucky strike by an object ball drive the cue beyond center table.

However, when letting whitey fly with power wherever the winds of chance may blow, possibly miniscule left, right, topspin or bottom, whatever just let it swing free and strong, I can almost assure you the cue ends a half diamond from either end rail first diamond and probably snookered behind a ball, with the object ball on the other end of the table. I hate hate hate that, and will to the best of my ability prevent it by consistent control of hit, speed, etc. rather than trusting to fickle fates.

Hello, Murphy, hows Chance doing these days? I know Chance all too well, and wish to avoid him like an old flame gone stale. I prefer control breaks like in the game of 14-1 straight pool, snooker, or one-pocket, than a whack-the-stack approach of some players to other games. Dead hit, dead cue ball, maximum power transfer, and if all goes well, one to 4 balls down and reasonable chances on the lowest ball next.
When Murphy rides on my shoulder, of course.

Kevin in Japan.

eg8r
02-14-2003, 05:07 PM
I just have one question... How in the heck can you judge... [ QUOTE ]
...83% of my maximum... <hr /></blockquote>C'mon, why not just say 80% or 75%? I know my post really is not contributing much to this, I just find it humorous that you have come up with the number of "83".

As far as I am concerned, I do not use all my power when I break however I try to use the max amount of power possible while controlling whitey.

I also agree with Fran. It is not like this soft break is anything new, and I believe the only reason we see it is because of the Sardo rack.

eg8r

eg8r
02-14-2003, 05:10 PM
[ QUOTE ]
You watch pool on TV these days and you will notice fewer "Archers and Stricklands" and more of the "make a ball and control whitie" breakers. Just my 2c.
<hr /></blockquote> I have also noticed that the Sardo is used more on TV these days.

[ QUOTE ]
I decided to break with my new pride and joy instead of getting the break stick, so being a friendly game, I under stroked with less speed. I made 2 balls and rolled the nine to the jaws of a corner pocket. I broke the second rack the same way, and again made 2 balls and rolled the 9 close to the same hole. What's that tell you about control vs hammer???.sid <hr /></blockquote> Sid, while taking nothing away from what you are trying to prove, I hardly doubt you have completely altered your breaking style from now until eternity on the outcome of two breakshots.

eg8r

eg8r
02-14-2003, 05:15 PM
[ QUOTE ]
I've noticed when watching the women on ESPN that a lot of them, seem to have reduce the power and maintain the control! <hr /></blockquote> Did you notice the Sardo rack?

I think this has little to do with control as much as it has to do with the opportunity of making the 1 ball in the side. I believe the women have followed suit (or did they start it) with Cory Deuel and have been making the 1 in the side by hitting the 1 ball in the correct spot with the same speed, soft. When I have seen the few female Florida pro tourneys, these women were hitting the balls with all they had, and there was only one thing different than what you see on the TV....No Sardo.

eg8r

02-14-2003, 08:41 PM
I agree with Fran (&amp; others here) that the Sardo rack is what has brought the "soft break" to pro pool. My earlier post may have been misinterpreted. I still use as much power as I can on every break, I just try to minimize body movement, and that helps my control. I think the breaker has much better odds pocketing a ball with a strong break, at least with a normal rack. I also think Archer has tremendous control of the rock on the break, even though he hammers it. I hate the soft break. To me, it's like serving underhanded in tennis.

02-14-2003, 10:41 PM
I am amazed at the number of people who wrote in on this saying they dont use their legs on the break. You dont use your legs to play pool &amp; hit normal shots, you do use your legs to break, they are a major component, they fire first, then other big muscles fire, followed by the smaller ones, its the same move in baseball, football, tennis, golf, etc. I hold the all time break record, 8 balls on the break at both 8 ball &amp; 9 ball, those records have stood untied for 40 years. I know of what I speak. You want to have a power break, throw your beef into it, and dont confuse this with the sissy break being used today, I'd rather wear a dress than break like that. The Sardo rack should be outlawed, it's ruined the power break, and that was the only reason they killed off straight pool for, was to put the power break that 9 ball featured on TV, go figger. You want to see how to move your legs, get my video tape &amp; watch me hit a 11 rail bank, that is the same move I put on the break. Fast Larry wwwfastlarrypool.com

Scott Lee
02-15-2003, 03:35 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fast Larry:</font><hr> I am amazed at the number of people who wrote in on this saying they dont use their legs on the break. You dont use your legs to play pool &amp; hit normal shots, you do use your legs to break, they are a major component, they fire first, then other big muscles fire, followed by the smaller ones, its the same move in baseball, football, tennis, golf, etc. I hold the all time break record, 8 balls on the break at both 8 ball &amp; 9 ball, those records have stood untied for 40 years. I know of what I speak. You want to have a power break, throw your beef into it, and dont confuse this with the sissy break being used today, I'd rather wear a dress than break like that. . Fast Larry wwwfastlarrypool.com <hr /></blockquote>

Larry...I've had enough of your bragging. Quit trying to confuse people. You do NOT have to use your legs for a very strong break. It can be done with the weight of the cue and perfect timing. I use NO leg movement whatsoever, and I break as well as anyone, including you. It simply is not necessary to "jump" into the break. The "sissy break" you refer to (which I'm assuming is 20 mph or less) is PLENTY of speed to crack open the rack sufficiently to pocket balls, as well as control the CB. More power with no control is not the answer.

Scott Lee

02-15-2003, 08:23 AM
Why 83%? I found it humorous too. Why not 83%?

Sid_Vicious
02-15-2003, 09:18 AM
"Sid, while taking nothing away from what you are trying to prove, I hardly doubt you have completely altered your breaking style from now until eternity on the outcome of two breakshots."

Completely right, it didn't, but it well proved(imo) my point about predictability and I'll use that(or a rendition of) that slower stroke on days when the standard break is not making balls. It's a much more logical approach than saying to myself, "Well I just have to whack harder!" The point of the entire matter was that focus and control, whatever it takes you to get there is FAR more important than an impressive, ear shattering hammer break if you can't A. Make a ball B. Control the CB. Your hammer breakers are losing more control by far than those who are making a ball and hitting softer. There are of course players who have perfected the hammer far better than the others, but it only tells me that they "made" that their specialty. Everyone has seen individually engineered aspects of the game's mechanics which are certainly not good basic fundamentals BUT which work for them. I just feel that the learning player of this game should not follow such philosohy in any kind of quest for consistency...sid

Troy
02-15-2003, 10:08 AM
Thank you Scott. It's reassuring to know I'm not the only one tired of this new-comer and his endless bragging.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr>
Larry...I've had enough of your bragging. Quit trying to confuse people. You do NOT have to use your legs for a very strong break. It can be done with the weight of the cue and perfect timing. I use NO leg movement whatsoever, and I break as well as anyone, including you. It simply is not necessary to "jump" into the break. The "sissy break" you refer to (which I'm assuming is 20 mph or less) is PLENTY of speed to crack open the rack sufficiently to pocket balls, as well as control the CB. More power with no control is not the answer.

Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>

woody_968
02-15-2003, 11:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fast Larry:</font><hr>and that was the only reason they killed off straight pool for, was to put the power break that 9 ball featured on TV <hr /></blockquote>

Sounds like you have watched The Color of Money one too many times /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

L.S. Dennis
02-15-2003, 11:50 AM
Larry, with all dur respect to your billiard accomplishments the reason they killed off straight pool as you put it was NOT so they could showcase the big break in nineball. The reason was that straight pool (although still my personal favorite game) was to slow and plodding for tv pure and simple. They needed a format that would move and nineball fits that bill. For that very same reason you won't be seeing and one pocket on tv either!

As for the power break you're going to have to re-think this one too. The Sardo Rack is here to stay whether you like it or not, and the power break is on the way out in my opinion. You got to learn to change with the times man!

Troy
02-15-2003, 12:10 PM
The WPBA has dumped the SARDINE GIZMO in favor of the Brunswick Big Break Rack. The SARDINE GIZMO's days are numbered, finally.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote L.S. Dennis:</font><hr> Larry, with all dur respect to your billiard accomplishments the reason they killed off straight pool as you put it was NOT so they could showcase the big break in nineball. The reason was that straight pool (although still my personal favorite game) was to slow and plodding for tv pure and simple. They needed a format that would move and nineball fits that bill. For that very same reason you won't be seeing and one pocket on tv either!

As for the power break you're going to have to re-think this one too. The Sardo Rack is here to stay whether you like it or not, and the power break is on the way out in my opinion. You got to learn to change with the times man! <hr /></blockquote>

L.S. Dennis
02-15-2003, 12:31 PM
I'm assuming that you're referring to the Sardo Rack in your reference to the "sardine gizmo" you need to try to make yourself more clear if you're able to. What I'm not sure about is the Brunswick Big Break Rack. Is this a new product or some other little bit of esoteric bit of information that you possess?

bluewolf
02-15-2003, 12:44 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fast Larry:</font><hr> I am amazed at the number of people who wrote in on this saying they dont use their legs on the break. You dont use your legs to play pool &amp; hit normal shots, you do use your legs to break, they are a major component, they fire first, then other big muscles fire, followed by the smaller ones, its the same move in baseball, football, tennis, golf, etc. I hold the all time break record, 8 balls on the break at both 8 ball &amp; 9 ball, those records have stood untied for 40 years. I know of what I speak. You want to have a power break, throw your beef into it, and dont confuse this with the sissy break being used today, I'd rather wear a dress than break like that. The Sardo rack should be outlawed, it's ruined the power break, and that was the only reason they killed off straight pool for, was to put the power break that 9 ball featured on TV, go figger. You want to see how to move your legs, get my video tape &amp; watch me hit a 11 rail bank, that is the same move I put on the break. Fast Larry wwwfastlarrypool.com <hr /></blockquote>

Gosh!!! This has the flavor of someone who hasnt been gone long. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

blu

Wally_in_Cincy
02-15-2003, 12:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote L.S. Dennis:</font><hr> I'm assuming that you're referring to the Sardo Rack in your reference to the "sardine gizmo" you need to try to make yourself more clear if you're able to.

<font color="blue">Troy does not the Sardo rack even one little bit no sirree. His term "sardine gizmo" is the way he shows his disdain for it. </font color>

What I'm not sure about is the Brunswick Big Break Rack. Is this a new product or some other little bit of esoteric bit of information that you possess?

<font color="blue">The WPBA has announced they are no longer using the Sardo rack, and will now use the Brunswick rack.

<font color="red">Wally~~really should not speak for Troy but hopes he doesn't mind. </font color>

</font color>

<hr /></blockquote>

L.S. Dennis
02-15-2003, 01:24 PM
Wally I'm well aware of Troy's disdain for the Sardo Rack and that is why he referred to it that way. What I'm not aware of is if the Sardo Rack gives the best possible rack on balance why would they not want to use it? And what is this "Brunswick Rack"? I suspect nothing more than most other standard wooden rack with the name Brunswick stamped on it somewhere.

Troy
02-15-2003, 01:52 PM
Thank you Wally.

Simply put, the SARDINE GIZMO does not "give the best possible rack on balance". Anyone taking the time to learn to rack correctly with a good wood triangle will have consistent success.

Having "trained" tables (with both new and used cloth) for the contraption and used the damn thing, I can tell you that craters must be made for it to create a tight rack. And, with those craters there is NO NEED for the over-priced plastic GIZMO since the balls just fall into the craters.

It's also great fun trying to slow roll a ball through that mine field.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote L.S. Dennis:</font><hr> Wally I'm well aware of Troy's disdain for the Sardo Rack and that is why he referred to it that way. What I'm not aware of is if the Sardo Rack gives the best possible rack on balance why would they not want to use it? And what is this "Brunswick Rack"? I suspect nothing more than most other standard wooden rack with the name Brunswick stamped on it somewhere. <hr /></blockquote>

Jon from MN
02-15-2003, 02:54 PM
I was at a big tounament and there was a break contest. They were using the sardo rack hahaha they didnt last long after a hour the people just quit trying. I personally have used them and dont like them. the break is like the kickoff in football, the jump ball in basketball, the dropping of the puck in hockey. its huge its fun to watch it gives pool the extra dimension the personality. Take the break away like the sardo did and you have boring pool to the average player. when I hear people talk about pool on tv they talk about the breaks{men} the great shots not the run outs. As for me and my breaking I have a great break and I definatly use my legs. I used to have a good break then I got some lessons and was taught to use my legs when I break and now I have a great break and can still controll whitty. Jon from Mn

02-15-2003, 04:12 PM
Thanks, Scott. Seems to me Larry is doing more bragging and advertising than contributing. I appreciate everyone's opinions, but not at the expense of belittling others. I'm also happy to see someone who is respected as a player and instructor on this board say they don't throw their body at the break. I believe in breaking hard, I just don't think you need to use your whole body to do it. I referred earlier to Mizerak. I have several tapes of him playing 9 ball, and some of his breaks are every bit as strong as Archer, Bustamante, Strickland, and others. If you use your body and that works for you, GREAT. But it is not a NECESSARY component of a powerful break.

woody_968
02-16-2003, 10:27 AM
A couple of years ago during a Texas Express tour event we had a break contest with a speed gun. A young kid that probably didnt way 120 when wet one it with no body movement at all.
Its about speed, not power, there is a difference.
(by the way, at that point the kid had already won national junior amature, so he knew more than just how to break)

eg8r
02-16-2003, 06:27 PM
[ QUOTE ]
your reference to the "sardine gizmo" you need to try to make yourself more clear if you're able to. <hr /></blockquote> Surely this was not unclear. Everyone on this board knows exactly what he meant. There is also not a whole lot of love for the sardine gizmo here on the board.

eg8r

02-16-2003, 06:58 PM
Dear Woody, I say use the legs &amp; the body, you say a kid did great doing the opposite. What that proves is there is more than one way to skin a cat. You can use different methods to produce the same result, and this does not mean one is right or wrong, or one is better than the other one. One should experiment with both, then choose the one that works best for your game. What makes a open form of discussion valuable is to have different methods revealed.
It used to irrate me to read golf digest, page 9 it says do it this way, page 20 another guru says do it that way, page 50 this guru says do it another way. It was driving me nuts, I called them &amp; said why cant you just print the best way for us, they said, we print what is out there, it is up to you to determine what works best for you, that is not our job. Regards, Fast Larry

bigbro6060
02-17-2003, 06:48 AM
you know i spent several hours on the weekend practising my 'leg power break' and i am really gettting the hang of it. It's getting more and more natural now. It feels really powerful and of course most importantly, looks sexy /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

You definitely have to push off from your front leg NOT your rear leg, i've got some good angle of Busty's break and it's not actually as hard as i thought it would be to emulate.

Still needs a lot of work but the raw material is there and i feel it will provide me with an alternative when more power is required

woody_968
02-17-2003, 07:54 AM
Larry, I couldnt agree more /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
I also read golf digest and understand what you mean, one thing to keep in mind is a good teacher may describe the same action in different ways. As people interperet things differently, sometimes saying the same thing three different ways is what it takes to get them to understand your point. And even then it may not work for them.

bluewolf
02-17-2003, 10:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bigbro6060:</font><hr> you know i spent several hours on the weekend practising my 'leg power break' and i am really gettting the hang of it. It's getting more and more natural now. It feels really powerful and of course most importantly, looks sexy /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

You definitely have to push off from your front leg NOT your rear leg, i've got some good angle of Busty's break and it's not actually as hard as i thought it would be to emulate.

Still needs a lot of work but the raw material is there and i feel it will provide me with an alternative when more power is required

<hr /></blockquote>

I have a break someone taught me that busts up all of the balls and one sometimes goes in and best of all the cb comes back a foot to the center of the table. I also have a email from a ccb person telling about the break where one pivots into it. I sometimes practice that with just the cb but havent gotten the hang of it yet. Sticking with the other one for now cuz like being able to know where cb is going.

blu

02-17-2003, 11:23 AM
My 2 cents (and might get flamed for it, but hope not)- I've never used a Sardo tight rack or even seen one except on TV. But it seems like a big, cheesy, gimic to me because, IMHO, it all depends on the condition of the spot and the condition of the table. You can have the tightest rack in the universe, but when you lift the contraption up off the table, wouldn't the balls settle according to the table (just like they do using a regular rack)? Nothing I hate more than when I get a good tight rack, lift up the triangle and the balls scatter like cockroaches when the lights turn on.

BTW (on the topic), I use my legs alot and have a pretty decent break. Also, in my opinion, if you break hard there is more of a chance of pocketing balls because instead of the balls bouncing off one or two rails, they will bounce around even more, giving more opportunity to eventually find a pocket to nestle itself in. Of course, that also means the cue will fly alot more too, like has been mentioned. There's a lot of personal preference and give-and-take there.

L.S. Dennis
02-17-2003, 11:35 AM
Cheesin' Your comments regarding the Sardo rack seem logical. I too have not seen one in the flesh so to speak and at their current prices you won't be seeing them in every pool room any time soon. As I watched them being used on tv it seems as though the balls are being pressed down as well as in when they are being racked. Maybe this has something to do with it.

I'm in favor of anything that will make the rack tighter. If these things really work then I'm in favor of them.
As Nick Varner says, "Everybody deserves and a good rack"

02-17-2003, 02:25 PM
A table must be "trained" for use with the Sardo, which involves tapping divots into the table. Once this is done, as others have mentioned, you almost don't need a rack anymore, as the balls will fall into place when gathered to the right spot!

For obvious reasons, this is why most folks hate the Sardo. I believe it was Jeanette Lee who was playing a match once and slow rolled a ball through this Sardo "minefield" and had whitey make an abrupt direction change when it hit a divot. She was understandably upset at missing her position shot, but I believe she did win the match.

If the Sardo worked its magic without this "training" and wasn't quite so pricey, then it MIGHT have a market. But I just don't understand what's so hard about racking a tight rack in a conventional, quality wood rack, therefore I fail to see the benefit of a racking gizmo. Maybe when they develop a racking system like in bowling where the balls are gathered, sorted, and racked automatically, then I'll be interested. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

David

Rod
02-17-2003, 03:13 PM
[ QUOTE ]
I believe it was Jeanette Lee who was playing a match once and slow rolled a ball through this Sardo "minefield" and had whitey make an abrupt direction change when it hit a divot. She was understandably upset at missing her position shot, but I believe she did win the match.
<hr /></blockquote>

I watched that match, if not one very similar. The c/b rolled through the divots and took a strange roll. I don't believe she was hooked ( I could be wrong) but a tiny fraction more and she would have been.

Not long ago playing a friend 14-1 I had similar happen. I had played perfect position on a ball. I needed to draw the ball about 1 1/2 inches. The last four balls were out from the corner pocket. Normally it should be handled right away but I only had a chance to bump them a little so each ball could be made. I drew whitey at perfect speed for the critical ball. The problem was it rolled up on the spot and rocked back leaving me hooked. I never thought or noticed the spot was where the c/b needed to stop. That ended my 60 something run because of table conditions. I have had strange rolls across the spot but not one that made much of a difference. I guess it is to be expected at a pool room but not intentionally put there by the use of a gadget.

Rod