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View Full Version : aiming method--for the newbies



heater451
02-14-2003, 11:08 AM
"travelerdl2" showed this to me, and I thought it was worth graphic support.

I'm sure it's not a big secret, but i had never realized that this is what 'those guys' were doing, when putting their cues on the table--just never thought through it. . . .

BTW, if anyone has any suggestions or corrections, PM me.

http://heater451.tripod.com/crutch.htm


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Wally_in_Cincy
02-14-2003, 11:40 AM
So how do you measure or determine the 1 1/8" distance when you pull the cue back?

A guy showed me something similar once. It works if your ferrule is exactly 1 1/8" long.

Cueless Joey
02-14-2003, 12:07 PM
I have a friend who does this on EVERY shot.
Drives me nuts. I don't see pros do it, so I don't think it's worth the trouble. I say find the contact point and hit it. Finding the contact point and staring at it intently promotes staying down too. My friend jumps a lot. He thinks because he knows where to aim (he points to the cloth where the center of the ghost ball should be), pocketing is automatic. He has a GC at home AND at his office. Practices daily. He's still not getting better.

Wally_in_Cincy
02-14-2003, 12:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cueless Joey:</font><hr> I have a friend who does this on EVERY shot.
Drives me nuts.

<font color="blue">That would drive me nuts too. </font color>

I don't see pros do it, so I don't think it's worth the trouble.

<font color="blue">I have a tape of Johnny Archer from 2001 Accu-stats 8-ball Invitational and he was doing this on many shots. I would watch it again and see how often he does it but I don't think I could take it again /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif </font color>

I say find the contact point and hit it. Finding the contact point and staring at it intently promotes staying down too. My friend jumps a lot. He thinks because he knows where to aim (he points to the cloth where the center of the ghost ball should be), pocketing is automatic. He has a GC at home AND at his office. Practices daily. He's still not getting better. <hr /></blockquote>

Cueless Joey
02-14-2003, 01:12 PM
Wally, kinda funny but Archer's game has gone down since he started doing that crap. He used to bend over and peek at the ball/contact point in line to the pocket.

Popcorn
02-14-2003, 01:38 PM
Everybody knows where to aim, even someone who never played the game could tell you where you have to hit the ball to make it. Aiming systems have some value in training the player to play instinctively, but none in actual play. They are only for training. Once a player starts trying to relay on a system, their game will stop improving. It hampers the player from gaining the confidence they need to let it happen, and just play. I never knew a good player that walked around doing all that stuff, they just play. There are no secrets waiting out there that nobody is telling, just good practice methods.

Popcorn
02-14-2003, 01:45 PM
quote
"I have a tape of Johnny Archer from 2001 Accu-stats 8-ball Invitational and he was doing this on many shots. I would watch it again and see how often he does it but I don't think I could take it again "


I would say he was doing it more due to nervousness then anything else. He may have been second guessing himself. He does not play like that, it was just something he was doing. Maybe to slow down his pace a little, but not because he needed it to increase the chances on making the ball. When I am a little nervous, I may find myself walking around looking at the shot from different angles. It is just because I am not ready to shoot and you need something to do, you can't just stand there staring at the shot. Sometimes you get a drink or chalk up, you just aren't ready.

Candyman
02-14-2003, 02:15 PM
Thanks Heater! I happened to pull up your site a couple of weeks ago and saw your aimming method. I had been having some good nights and some bad ones when it came to seeing the line. I tried your deal just to varify the line and I really like it. My game has gone to the next level, thanks to you. The Candyman.

heater451
02-14-2003, 02:37 PM
I would just eyeball it (if I used the method), thinking that it's supposed to be half the diameter of the ball size.--I know this makes it almost the same as just "knowing" where to hit, but remember, I posted it as a training aid for those who are new(er) to the game.

Also, if you've seen the "Margin of Error" bit on the site, you should realize that there's a bit of forgiveness built into every shot, so the measurement can be close, without having to be exact.

. . .I didn't even think about the correct size of tip/ferrule being another aid. That may be a help to some as well.


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heater451
02-14-2003, 02:52 PM
. . .and thank you, for the kind words.

When travelerdl2 (Mark) and I met for the first time, we actually talked about a few different aiming styles.

I actually think the "equal-distance" method is the most flexible (without requiring using the cue as a 'crutch'), but it's personally harder for me to see. I actually use a lot of 'guestimates' in some of my shots, relying on what feels 'right', especially on the "Hail-Marys".

Usually, the only time I think "technical", is when a bank shot lies on a perfect-diamond line.

Anyway, sytems will only get you part of the way, you still have to have good stroke mechanics--and speed control is a big plus. . . .I also believe that a seasoned player may be able to use an aiming system as a 'check', or to remove a variable from their routine, if they are 'off'. That is, if you can eliminate aiming from the equation, then it makes it easier to focus on your mechanics. (I know, some will still say that the system may not be effective enough, even for that, but I'm posting my opinion here. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif )

Now, if someone could inform me of a method of how to improve my **luck**, I might get good at this game. . . .


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02-14-2003, 07:01 PM
Go buy a set of elephant balls, plus a aim trainer, many places sell them. Use them to see the aim point, or to visualize the ghost ball principle. This will help, but the truth is, you wont fully understand this, nor be fully compentent in this, until you have pocketed a million balls, Once you have done this, you will no longer ask the question, then you will know, there is no shortcut to this, and this can take a decade. Regards, Fast Larry Guninger, www.fastlarrypool.com (http://www.fastlarrypool.com)

bigbro6060
02-14-2003, 07:31 PM
To aiming has to be perfected by feel

You set up a shot, you miss, you work out what you did wrong (overcut, undercut), you take the shot again. Repeat till u can make a decent number in a row.

It's not funny how many times i've tried to second guess my instincts and missed !

the trick for newbies is to know how to analyze errors

heater451
02-15-2003, 07:08 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fast Larry:</font><hr> . . .the truth is, you wont fully understand this, nor be fully compentent in this, until you have pocketed a million balls, Once you have done this, you will no longer ask the question, then you will know, there is no shortcut to this, and this can take a decade<hr /></blockquote>It's the first few tens to hundreds that new shooters need help with the most. After you've shot a million, I don't think you need to rely on a rote and repetition method. . . .

Also, since most people don't have tables at home, and I doubt would want to take Elephant balls to the local hall, starting with a 'system' is a simple way to go.

BTW, I noticed you are in Duluth. Greetings from the Smyrna area.



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heater451
02-15-2003, 07:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bigbro6060:</font><hr> To aiming has to be perfected by feel

You set up a shot, you miss, you work out what you did wrong (overcut, undercut), you take the shot again. Repeat till u can make a decent number in a row.

It's not funny how many times i've tried to second guess my instincts and missed !

the trick for newbies is to know how to analyze errors <hr /></blockquote>**Again**, a system is just a way to obtain a baseline. Setting up drills and practicing repetition is a viable alternative, but I'm willing to bet that fewer people enjoy doing that, over applying an aiming method.

As for "instincts", you might find that you are actually describing a behavior, which has been practiced to the point of simulating a sub-conscious action. That is, if you aim by "instinct", it is because you have learned how to aim, and repeated that process enough that it has become "second nature". It's a learned behavior. (Sorry, I'm starting to argue semantics. . . .)


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Fran Crimi
02-15-2003, 08:33 PM
Nice graphics on that. Would you mind if I printed it out to give to my students?

It gets hard to do with long shots, though. Another way I found was to find an aiming point someplace behind the 1 1/8 spot, like the edge of another ball or a point on a rail, then aim for that. I think that sometimes it's easier to have something to point your cue at rather than just air.

START(
%AI5H3%BL7P8%CK5Q3%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HH5G5%I L7O4%JK6M5
%KJ5P7%LL6O8%MN5O1%NJ5R0%OF3H9%Pc5H4%Wa8H3%XC0H2
)END

bluewolf
02-16-2003, 07:54 AM
I think that this is why my hardest cut is the one where the ob is one diamond or so out from the rail and two diamonds from the corner pocket. This is when I am trying to go pretty long and it is hard when I have all of that green. It is harder than the ones closer to the rail etc. It seems like it is not having a visual reference point.

blu

heater451
02-16-2003, 09:58 AM
Fran, you are welcome to anything I post--in fact, it's there for anyone who comes across it.

Also, I agree with you about aiming at 'something', over the guestimated aimpoint. It makes a lot more sense to have a real target.

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woody_968
02-16-2003, 10:03 AM
[/quote
As for "instincts", you might find that you are actually describing a behavior, which has been practiced to the point of simulating a sub-conscious action. That is, if you aim by "instinct", it is because you have learned how to aim, and repeated that process enough that it has become "second nature". It's a learned behavior. (Sorry, I'm starting to argue semantics. . . .)


================= <hr /></blockquote>

I agree with what you are saying here, although I didnt use a system to learn with I have started tinkering with one for practice. I am using it to try and see where I am really aiming. Just like in golf while putting, many people think they aim at one point, while actually aiming somwhere else, then there stroke is even a little different than that.
Working to find out for sure where you are aiming will eliminate one veriable, then you will know if your stroke is true of if you just think it is straight.
One guy that plays in our local hall aims so far off the target line you would think he will miss the ball all together, but he always pulls the cue back on line with his final stroke and doesnt even know he does it.

Popcorn
02-16-2003, 12:07 PM
I am curious how you did that drawing. Is it done on the computer? Obviously I don't know much about this stuff.

heater451
02-16-2003, 02:31 PM
I did the "drawing" with Adobe Illustrator (http://www.adobe.com/products/illustrator/overview.html). I'm not great with it, but simple diagrams are well within my skillset. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

If it were a small resolution graphic, I might have run it through Photoshop, to export a GIF (a type of file compression, that works well with 'flat' color--good for text and charts). But, I find that dragging the Illustrator file through Flash, and exporting an .SWF keeps the filesize down, in order to help minimize download times.--I started doing this with the 'mixed aiming' diagram, which is really large, because using GIF compression wouldn't decrease the filesize very much.



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Dafatman
02-16-2003, 09:33 PM
Great diagram. For newbies, you can chalk up the tip and when you place it on the cloth, you can make a little mark for assistance. But beware of the player who does this in competition, it's cheating!!!!!

02-16-2003, 11:16 PM
After 40+ years of trying every method of aiming with no significant improvement, I have recently been taught by a pro with a zen bent who told my to abandone my physical and technical game, which looked pretty good by most standards, except the ghost ball concept. I even went back to an open bridge. I now sight with the top of the CB, not the center. and have learned to give-up my old tedious repitive stroke with the final pause for a simpler two stroke (one practice and then go, everytime. I am now hand-eye, and always align my body the same way for each shot. From set-up to execution is the same continuos and fluid set of steps: eyes to pocket, see the path of object to pocket, see the trajectory of the CB to the ghost ball, aim with the body, eyes on the path, bridge on the table, fully cocked with desired english, eyes down as I aim at the CB with one practice stroke, eyes back on the object and the path , and then the second stroke. It took while not to keep looking at CB, but other than the one practice I watch the ball going into the pocket. My accuracy, especially on long shots has dramatically improved. ANd you know you missed it the split second you hit the CB. This took 8 hours of play to be able to do this routine the same way each time. It will take months for it to be automatic, but there is no turning back. It is a very enjoyable and calm routine and my racks go quicker, my runs are longer, and my confidence is stronger. All game strategy is still intact.
The refinement of the stroke awaits me.

CarolNYC
02-17-2003, 05:58 AM
I thought I recognized the name when we handed out these sheets-VERY COOL!
Take Care!
Carol~tapping her cue /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif