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View Full Version : Disapointed w/ table quality



03-17-2002, 01:47 PM
I bought a "AMF" "Play Master" at a billard store, paid $2100.00 for a demo model that had been sitting on the floor for years. It is a pretty "furniture" type 7'. This has to be one of the weakest tables on the market.

If I knew then what I know now...

The slate has "popped" at both joints, and the frame is "shakey"(can take one finger and rock the table back and forth. The problem is, I have been shooting on it for a couple of years now.

I read about the new compound some of you are useing to prevent the slate from popping(sounds good). But how about the rigidity of the frame? You would think that the slate popping would be caused,in part,by the frame flexing or racking.

Any sugestions or fixes for my problem(s),

I thought the table I was buying was good for the money at the time(before I got on-line), I compared my table to other tables in the store that were priced at 20+K and they all had the same frame design, I can't believe someone could pay that kind of $ for these tables! The legs bolt on with metal brackets, and the slate is only supported by hard wood parrell to the joints. This table is 2800. +tax for new, I saved $800. by buying the demo.

Any way, thanks in adv. for any post replys...

Q-guy
03-17-2002, 02:22 PM
I agree about the table. Would not want one for a gift. Your problem now is the resale value of pool tables is so bad you would be lucky to get half of what you paid. I always recommend looking for a good used table. Some people don't care about the price but even those with high end tables like a Diamond will be shocked at the loss they will take if they decide to sell it. If I were you I may be on the lookout for another table. You may be amazed at what you may come across. I paid $400.00 for my beautifully Gold Crown. I also have a Gandy Big G in storage I got for nothing. Once someone does not want the table anymore, are moving and no longer have room, or are selling their house it becomes a real problem to them. They don't know how to take it apart and they can't move it. It cost money to have it moved. As you can tell I don't value used tables much.

JimS
03-17-2002, 02:22 PM
Sorry to hear the table isn't great. The Liquid Dowel does appear to work well. I would have to agree with you that the shakiness would make the slate pop. It makes sense. I would think you need to find a local table mechanic to see if he has any suggestions about beefing up the table and tell him about the Liquid Dowel.

Alfie
03-17-2002, 02:44 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Gen.J:</font><hr> I bought a "AMF" "Play Master" at a billard store, paid $2100.00 for a demo model that had been sitting on the floor for years. It is a pretty "furniture" type 7'. This has to be one of the weakest tables on the market.

If I knew then what I know now...

The slate has "popped" at both joints, and the frame is "shakey"(can take one finger and rock the table back and forth. The problem is, I have been shooting on it for a couple of years now.

I read about the new compound some of you are useing to prevent the slate from popping(sounds good). But how about the rigidity of the frame? You would think that the slate popping would be caused,in part,by the frame flexing or racking.

Any sugestions or fixes for my problem(s),

I thought the table I was buying was good for the money at the time(before I got on-line), I compared my table to other tables in the store that were priced at 20+K and they all had the same frame design, I can't believe someone could pay that kind of $ for these tables! The legs bolt on with metal brackets, and the slate is only supported by hard wood parrell to the joints. This table is 2800. +tax for new, I saved $800. by buying the demo.

Any way, thanks in adv. for any post replys... <hr></blockquote>
Sounds like a poor installation. Racking would not pop a seam. There should be no problem if all joints were tight, the table was levelled properly, it was not moved improperly, and was not nudged to a slightly different position on an uneven floor.

Reinstall.

Harold Acosta
03-17-2002, 02:48 PM
You will definitely have to check the supports of your table. I strongly suggest you visit www.advantasearch.com (http://www.advantasearch.com) and contact John Kirchel. His site has some great information about building a pool table and some of the information there will sure be of assistance. The site and information is easy to read and he has pictures. You can download the information for free.

In 1996 when the PBT &amp; Camel did the Grand Prix of Puerto Rico, the AMF tables were used. Six of these tables stayed in Puerto Rico, and as of this date, I have not heard any troubles about them.

Anyway, I sure hope you can find a satisfactory solution with the website provided above.

Brady_Behrman
03-17-2002, 03:40 PM
You need to fully take apart the table and check all supports, then after all is secure, every bolt screw etc...Then you need The liquid Dowel that I sell and your in bus!

Need any further assistance, let me know
Brady

03-17-2002, 03:45 PM
I also say "reinstall", if it was set up poorly the first time it will never be right. I used to play in a room with "old" big G Gandy commercial tables and they also swayed lengthwise, now these had been in place over 20 years, IMO the tables should "never" do this unless its a design or install problem or a combination of both. BF

Q-guy
03-17-2002, 09:59 PM
The other posters are right. The best thing is to strip down the table and go over every nut bolt and screw. I don't think much of the table, but it should not be as bad as you describe. One of the problems with a lot of these tables is just a lack of mass. You have 800 lb's of slate on top of a light weight frame. The difference can be a lot. It takes two strong men just to lift the frame of a Gold Crown on to the legs when assembling it. While some tables once the slates are removed I can pick up the table, legs, sides frame and all by myself. All these tables have about the same weight slates. The physics of the situation are obvious. I am really saying this for the benefit of future table buyers. Don't be afraid to crawl around under the table and see how it is really built before you buy.

03-18-2002, 06:12 AM
Hey guyes, thanks for the replys, as I expected, no "quick/easy fixes! When my next "ship" comes in, a better quality table is on my list. If I had a nickle for every game played on this table... unfortunantly, it doesn't work that way!

This table had been set up for many years as a demo, one would think that the frame and such would have warped,settled,bowed as much as it was going to. Giveing the table some credit, it was set up in a new house on a new hardwood floor, maybe the next setup will last longer, if I can stiffen up the frame.

Harold Acosta- Thanks for the link to John Kirchel's site, I read some of it yesterday, unfortunantly, this morning I went back to this site to read some more and it now states that he has removed the full article from the web, selling his work on ebay, it was a good article, I should have stayed on and finished reading, snooze you loose...

Anyway, thanks again, you guyes/gals have some great reading on this forum, I'll spend a lot of time here. I've been reading B Digest for a couple of years, and just now started looking up some of the web sites they have listed.(good stuf)

Thanks again...