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View Full Version : Can video kill the poolplaying star?



cycopath
02-26-2003, 06:12 PM
I was just thinking what if you video taped yourself shooting as to examine your stance and stroke, and you saw some little detail or details that you thought you needed to correct. And then everytime you shoot thereafter you try and correct this little glitch. Wouldn't that disturb the focus on your actual shot?

Anyone experienced this?

mark wilson
02-26-2003, 06:28 PM
The video is a good idea and yes your game will suffer as you install a new habit, but within two weeks you should see a gain and the new and improved approach will be a habit.

snipershot
02-26-2003, 08:02 PM
I agree, watching video of yourself shooting would allow you to fix any problems with your shot. I also think changing your shot would hurt you at first, but since your fixing something that's hurting your shot in the first place this change would be better for you in the long run.

Snipershot,
wished he could watch video of himself shooting.

socrates
02-26-2003, 08:49 PM
I thought video killed the radio star. (Sorry accountant humor.)

First I am assuming there is an actual flaw that should be corrected for long-term benefits. If a change is necessary then we must be willing to leave our comfort zone in order to make the incremental steps for continuous improvement.

I think one of the things that makes this such a great game is the opportunity it presents for constant improvement.

It all starts with solid fundamentals and good stroke mechanics.

Wishing you success.

Scott Lee
02-26-2003, 09:23 PM
Mark...Good to see you posting! Don't you think he should videotape from at least two angles...headon, and from the side? How about shots where the CB is on the spot? I would recommend a set series of shots...like 10, done in the same order, until you make the shot...and then do it again from the side angle. If you can also do it, the rear view is very telling, in seeing any strange movements in the swing. That would show up flaws in the stroke almost immediately.

Scott Lee

cycopath
02-26-2003, 09:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote socrates:</font><hr> I thought video killed the radio star.<hr /></blockquote>I was waiting for someone to make reference to the Buggles song.

mark wilson
02-26-2003, 09:59 PM
Scott, I agree that a great benefit would be derived for all of us to examine our own video and treat the weak areas. I like your suggested multiple camera angles as it would help discover any root cause in regard to a swing problem. On a side note Jerry Briesath stopped by for dinner and we did some catching up. Good to hear from you and great advice.

SpiderMan
02-27-2003, 12:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cycopath:</font><hr> I was just thinking what if you video taped yourself shooting as to examine your stance and stroke, and you saw some little detail or details that you thought you needed to correct. And then everytime you shoot thereafter you try and correct this little glitch. Wouldn't that disturb the focus on your actual shot?

Anyone experienced this? <hr /></blockquote>

My experience has been the opposite, ie video was an enormous help. If you have some insidious problem, you choice is to have someone observe you and try to describe it, or get yourself videotaped. In my opinion, the tape is much better as it provides firsthand feedback. Even if you have an expert observer, there's nothing like seeing yourself on tape. I would expect any good fundamentals instructor to videotape a student as he executed a standard array of shots.

A while back I had a problem that was difficult for me to detect. If I set up a long shot, I would make it when shooting soft but would gradually miss it to the right as I shot harder and harder. It turned out that, when I shot hard, I had a tendency to curl my wrist inward and choke the butt of the cue. Since I was bridging behind the pivot point of exact compensation (as relates to backhand english) on my 13.5mm shaft, the cueball's resultant squirt to the left was making me miss to the right. I would probably never have visualized exactly what I was doing by listening to someone else try to describe it.

I'm sure Scott will appreciate this, as it directly supports his theory of most misses being attributable to a flawed stroking technique.

SpiderMan

SpiderMan
02-27-2003, 12:48 AM
I believe that was the name of the group.

SpiderMan

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cycopath:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote socrates:</font><hr> I thought video killed the radio star.<hr /></blockquote>I was waiting for someone to make reference to the Buggles song. <hr /></blockquote>

cycopath
02-27-2003, 01:16 AM
PUSA covered the song. the Buggles originally recorded it.

02-27-2003, 03:03 AM
Since l993, everything I have done has been on camera, for 5 years, everything was filmed using 3 angles, 3 cameras. Now if it is important, I use 2 cameras, 2 angles, I found the 3rd angle was at best, nothing but a backup &amp; waste of time. Everything on the Ripleys set I shot was filmed using 4 cameras. Everytime I go into my studio &amp; begin to do anything, a digital camera is rolling, you never know what fluke will occur that I want to study. The true secret of why I have done so much others cant do, is filming &amp; studying &amp; then understanding what I am seeing.
If you are not a pro, I am not sure you are going to be able to analyze your self that well. Find a pro who teaches with a camera, and never take a lesson ever again, unless the teacher films it. It the teacher does not use a camera, in my book, he is not a pro, shop around, find a pro who owns &amp; uses a camera. Best Wishes, Fast Larry Guninger

NBC-BOB
02-27-2003, 12:54 PM
I use to setup my old camcorder and tape myself,playing straight pool.At one point I made, a bracket to hang the camera on from the ceiling and that worked ok but!I would think with todays newer technology(smaller cameras ETC.)I could do a better job of it.The best I think is if you have someone to handle the camera and be able to zoom in and out on shots,cueball,hand position etc.You just don't get that flexibility when you set the camera up on a tripod and shoot.At least thats my experience!

travellerdl2
02-27-2003, 02:00 PM
Scott, (another Mark here)
Just this week someone asked me why I was going to take another lesson? My answer was "because I cannot see myself play." A good instructor can see correct flaws that the student doesn't know exist.
See you in April, Mark Hagerman

Popcorn
02-27-2003, 08:11 PM
Another use of video tape can be for mental practice. You can get a boost watching accu-stats tapes but you are watching someone else's fundamentals. If you watch a tape of yourself, playing good in the quiet of your home. It can be like mental practice. Ben Hogen used to talk about sitting in a chair and imagining the perfect putt. It was like practice in a way. Video takes it to another level using more senses. I have video of myself and I can feel the shots going in when I watch it. I think I can actually stay in stroke between mental video practice combined with a minimum of real practice. I have video of myself running balls perfectly I made around 1978. I had one of the first black and white cameras and recorders, it was the size of a suit case. In one old video, I run 118 and it is perfect, never really out of line, moving around the table, pocketing balls. I still like to watch it. Afterwards I actually feel like I just finished practicing. Just some food for thought. I think it could be a tool that would shorten the learning curve. I had it in my poolroom and players used to come from all over to play in front of the camera. None had ever seen themselves play before on TV. Most had never even seen a videotape machine at all when I bought this stuff. By today's standards, my equipment was junk, but I paid $3000. for the stuff, mostly just so I could tape poolplayers.