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L.S. Dennis
02-28-2003, 01:56 AM
Ever wonder where pool got the words 'Scratch, English, or Kitchen? Just wondering1

Scott Lee
02-28-2003, 03:43 AM
The term "english" actually came from England. The english called spin "side" for sidespin (what we call "english"), and "screw" for what we call "draw"! The "kitchen" term came from history, where often pool tables took up so much room in the house, that you sometimes had to stand 'in the kitchen' to take a shot. I'm not sure about the origin of the word "scratch".

Scott Lee

02-28-2003, 05:05 AM
Just a theory

when the CB falls in the pocket, they used to scratch away one point from the chalk board.

NH_Steve
02-28-2003, 05:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote post-it:</font><hr> Just a theory

when the CB falls in the pocket, they used to scratch away one point from the chalk board. <hr /></blockquote>"They" was of course the dogs in that famous old painting, right /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Fred Agnir
02-28-2003, 07:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote L.S. Dennis:</font><hr> Ever wonder where pool got the words 'Scratch, English, or Kitchen? Just wondering1 <hr /></blockquote>
I can't tell if you're asking, or telling. Here's my take (which is pretty much what everyone else has already said):

English: just like we call French Toast or Mexican Rotation, or Boston pool, I assume the first "people" that Americans saw use sidespin with any effect was from England. So, it was termed here as "English."

Now, here's a theory that nobody seems to agree with. The term "masse'" comes from France, right? Or does it. I'd love to find out the etymology of it. In Boston, the proclivity to add an "r" and pronounce short "a" as "" as in "father" has a lot of Bostonians saying something that sounds like: mar say

To further this, we know that the first person to use a leather tip was a frenchman, Mingaud. And, to further, the French in general must have been the first to really show off "sidespin." If (I'm really reaching here) the first person that the English saw using sidespin was from, say, Marseille, France, would they call extreme english shots "Marseille shots"?

Kitchen: As was pointed out, often times the pool table could only fit in the adjoining dining room (or living room) to the kitchen. Shooting from balk would naturally have you literally standing in the kitchen. In my first house, that's exactly how it was.

Scratch: Scratching a point. That was a common term in other sports, IIRC. Of course, one could argue that a player would be scratching his head in amazement after dropping the cueball in a pocket.


Fred

Deeman
02-28-2003, 08:45 AM
"Masse" does derive it's roots from the French word, to rub.

Dee

Jon from MN
02-28-2003, 09:38 AM
Wow pool has really evolved since the smoke filled halls and bars. Now we use words to describe pool most players from yesteryear couldnt even pronounce. lol Jon from mn

SPetty
02-28-2003, 11:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jon from MN:</font><hr> Wow pool has really evolved since the smoke filled halls and bars. <hr /></blockquote>Yeah, like, today I play pool in smoke filled halls and bars... /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif