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Yuppie
03-03-2003, 09:18 AM
I tried the search feature of the site, but didn't really have much luck.

I'm sure this question gets asked a lot, but I'm going to ask again. How does one remove dents and dings and nicks from their shaft? I've read one way is to put a drop of water on the ding then take a dollar bill and burnish, generating heat to draw out the ding. Another said to add water and take a lighter to it (don't like this one so much). Another said to take a damp cloth and take an iron to it.

Has anyone else had much luck at home removing small dents and dings and such?

Thanx!

Barbara
03-03-2003, 09:30 AM
Well the reason why you're always mentioning water in the first part of each of your solutions is because water will swell the wood. Think about what a ding is. You've compressed the wood in a very small spot. Putting a drop of water on it will swell that spot.

What I do on my shafts is what my Cue Man and the maker of my cue taught me. I get a cue tip and wet it with water. Then I put that cue tip on the ding and hold it there for about 10 minutes. Then I take some 1200 grit paper to it to smooth down that spot. If it's still compressed, I repeat the procedure. After I get it smooth, then I burnish the whole area.

I would not recommend using an iron as you could warp the shaft.

Barbara

Troy
03-03-2003, 09:36 AM
What Barbara wrote is how I fix dings on customer cues. For really bad dings, I use a wet bandaid.

Troy...~~~ Spins shaft on a lathe but the result is what counts

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> Well the reason why you're always mentioning water in the first part of each of your solutions is because water will swell the wood. Think about what a ding is. You've compressed the wood in a very small spot. Putting a drop of water on it will swell that spot.

What I do on my shafts is what my Cue Man and the maker of my cue taught me. I get a cue tip and wet it with water. Then I put that cue tip on the ding and hold it there for about 10 minutes. Then I take some 1200 grit paper to it to smooth down that spot. If it's still compressed, I repeat the procedure. After I get it smooth, then I burnish the whole area.

I would not recommend using an iron as you could warp the shaft.

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

03-03-2003, 10:12 AM
I like to boil water in a tea kettle. Wait for the steam to start pouring out pretty good and then hold the ding over the steam. This seems to work faster than holding a wet compress on the ding. Once the wood has been raised back up, you'll need to sand the area with some 1200 paper.

If you don't have a tea kettle, just boil water in a pan, cover with aluminum foil and poke a small hole in the center of it so a small stream of steam rises out.

I got this idea from someone here a couple of years ago and it works for me.

Chris

L.S. Dennis
03-03-2003, 10:29 AM
Steam is what seems to work the best for the removal of dings and dents. I've used the tea kettle method for a long time, if you don't have the kettle that whistles when ready you can use the steam from a steam iron. I've tried all the other ways with wet q-tips and such, which all work to a minor degree but steam is best.

Ward
03-03-2003, 10:37 AM
You can use a small cloth,cue tip, wet it and place it in a microwave for a few seconds... I wouldn't use steam on any Predator shafts I think it will void the warranty...

Later

03-03-2003, 10:55 AM
Really? I guess that's because they are glued together?

Chris

SpiderMan
03-03-2003, 12:21 PM
Seems like they don't really "have" a warranty, per SPetty.

SpiderMan

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ward:</font><hr> You can use a small cloth,cue tip, wet it and place it in a microwave for a few seconds... I wouldn't use steam on any Predator shafts I think it will void the warranty...

Later <hr /></blockquote>

SPetty
03-03-2003, 01:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Seems like they don't really "have" a warranty, per SPetty.<hr /></blockquote>To clarify... They don't have a warranty against warpage. They have a lifetime warranty against manufacturer's defects, except warpage. And yes, the warranty is void if you steam the shaft.

http://www.predatorcues.com/english/warranty.htm

NBC-BOB
03-03-2003, 01:46 PM
I like the steam kettle method for removing dents and have used this method for years. However a nick implies that the wood fibers have been removed, and the wood fibers cannot be raised with steam, because there not there.
Hopefully what you have is dents and not nicks.

Yuppie
03-03-2003, 02:18 PM
Yes! They are dents and hopefully one of these methods will do the trick. So 1200 sandpaper is alright to take to the shaft? I've read in so many different places the dangers of using sandpaper.

socrates
03-03-2003, 02:25 PM
Appears there are several good posts regarding the use of steam or boiling water and a cloth. I use the boiling water and a cloth method myself.

What I might add. I find it helpful to hit the ding with sandpaper very lightly before applying the cloth. what you are trying to do is remove the seal that has built up around and in the ding from the oils etc. Hitting it with sandpaper very lightly removes this buildup and imo helps the water raise the wood better.

I then use a hair dryer immediately to dry the ding and the shaft. You can then tell whether you need to apply the hot water on the ding again.

Finally I hit with 600 or 1200 sandpaper.

Hope that helps.

Tom_In_Cincy
03-03-2003, 02:31 PM
I've been using a damp cloth applied to the area of the ding or nick. Then taking a hot low wattage (15 watt) soldering iron and applying the tip of the soldering iron to the cloth at the point of the ding or nick. This takes about a minute to steam into the wood and making it swell up and remove the ding or nick. The cloth is only placed on the area of the nick or ding.

Then I let it dry and sand with 1000, 1200 and then 2000 to get the mirror like sheen on the cue shaft. I only have to do this once every 3 or 4 months, I am real careful with my shafts, but there are always accidents.

#### leonard
03-03-2003, 03:56 PM
Here is my solution for nicks. I nicked my shaft and was left with missing shaft. I took a yellow crayon and rubbed it into the nick whamo the nick is gone. That was years ago it has never been a problem since.####

SPetty
03-03-2003, 05:17 PM
When this question was asked before (is anyone surprised about that? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ), someone suggested that since no wood was added when the shaft is dented, then no wood should be removed when the dent is raised, suggesting that raising the dent above where it was and then sanding it off might not be the right thing.

That made a lot of sense to me.

I've successfully raised a few dents, usually by taking a tiny wet piece of tissue and letting it sit on the dent for awhile. I do that several times and when it is still slightly damp, burnish with a paper towel or leather to heat it up a little more.

There's also the idea, which I've not used, of raising the dent and then rubbing it with a hard glass object so as to "press" the raised dent back into its rightful place rather than sand it off.

Just one more point of view.

03-03-2003, 06:52 PM
I agree with Chris Alvery, I use the tea kettle, and that is the same way they took dents out at the Schuler cue factory, steam. Bert Kinister put this on one of his video tapes. You may not know this, but when you take your cue in to a lot of shops &amp; say recondition the shaft, what you are not going to see them do is steam &amp; then sand it on a lathe. Water on wood is not good, and sanding away wood is not good also. The only reason I jumped in here, is you'll missed a very important tool. Furniture movers carry it in their pockets, the old timers used to use a coke bottle. It is a glass rod, about 3" long, and it's called a dent buffer, it is imported glass from Italy, &amp; when you get a ding, You rub the area virgously for several minutes, or until your hand goes numb, &amp; the heat rises the wood &amp; the ding can be removed this way. It's a lot of work, this is the hard way to do it, trust me. I dont go anywhere with out mine. When you get a ding, get on it fast, before the wood sets up hard around the crater, So I hit it with the rod in the pool hall. When I get home, then I might also steam it a little, then when I am done, do the rod again, it helps to smooth the area around the ding, then fine sand, taking off as little wood as possible. If it is a serious ding, then some heavy sanding probably will be needed. To me, shafts are like cars, they are expendable, they dont last forever, when they begin to wear out &amp; get old, I dump them. Get a hold of a Muller catalog out of Lincoln, Neb, good stuff, fair prices, you can buy it there.
This used to be sold by the Cue Doctor, who went out of business. I used to sell their line, &amp; run around in a green surgeons gown, saying I am da cue doctor dude. I had this name tag, had my name &amp; a DBR after it, doctor of billiard ology. That outfit would get you a fast &amp; nice seat in a resturant, but then you had to tip big like a doctor. Be careful with the rod, never drop it on a hard floor, if you do, it's toast. Everyone should own one, seriously. I realize no matter where you put your cue, some drunk can come along I kick it over, but most dings occur because of your poor handling of your cue. You keep dropping your cue against a chair or some object, and most of your dings will be in about the same place. Be more careful, and you can eliminate about 90% of the dings you had in the past. Best Wishes, Fast Larry Guninger www.fastlarrypool.com (http://www.fastlarrypool.com) Shoot straight, innovate, no fear, &amp; never give up, VENI, VIDI, VICI.....

cycopath
03-04-2003, 01:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fast Larry:</font><hr>Be careful with the rod, never drop it on a hard floor, if you do, it's toast. <hr /></blockquote>My dad's gone through 3 of 'em that way.