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snipershot
03-13-2003, 09:10 PM
Lately Before playing (any game), to warm up I've just been throwing balls onto the table and just randomly shooting whatever, I like this because I can shoot combos, jumps, anything I really want that I might run into in a game. I've also set up clusters and problem balls on purpose so that I'm totally prepared come game time. Who else has tried this and do you think it's a good way to warm up?

Mr. Blonde
03-13-2003, 09:25 PM
I'll throw a few balls on the table and start shooting at whatever when i'm playing at home and I get bored.

Rod
03-13-2003, 10:02 PM
Using the term warm up, I shoot soft cut shots down the long rail, both sides, hitting the pocket clean. I then cut a few along the short rail, soft stroke. These shots are a ball or two off the rail about a 15%-20% angle. From there I pick up the speed and shoot random cuts ect. About 20 to 30 minutes and I'm fairly warmed up.

Randomly throwing balls out may follow for a while but I need the first part to zero in my aim and to fine tune the stroke. If I'm by myself I've got to play a game, 14-1 fargo or possibly the ghost in 9 ball. I need a goal or I can get real bored just shooting balls.

Rod

03-13-2003, 10:50 PM
Yes I always warm up this way. I start off slow and then try to hit a wide variety of shots. I usually shoot 2-3 sets of 15 balls. I practice kicks the same way. Throw em all out and just pick out kick shots.

03-14-2003, 04:48 AM
I like to start out with absolutely straight-in shots. The longer the better. Includes both cross-corner and rail shots while inducing varying degrees of follow, draw, and stop. When I can make a rack-full without missing, I know my stoke is in tune. Then I setup gradually increasing cut shots starting with one-ball off of straight-in to whatever I have time for. Again, the longer the shot the better. Next I set a row of five balls along the table center line with the center ball straight in to the side pocket. Then shot them into only one side pocket, in order, using draw for position without touching a rail. When I can run all five balls, I know my draw is ready. Lastly, if I have time, I put all the balls in a loose cluster around the foot spot and attempt to clear the table starting with ball in hand. If I'm successful with all these routines, I really feel pumped and ready to take on anybody.

Leviathan
03-14-2003, 07:00 AM
It's the same for me, Rod. I prefer a structured warmup.

I like to start with 15 spot shots from the left and 15 spot shots from the right. This gets my eyes adjusted, straightens my stroke, gives me the speed of the cloth, and shows me how the balls are throwing.

Then I shoot 15 shots from each of the 4 positions shown in this Wei diagram):

START(
%Ap7K9%Bp8R4%C[0\4%D[2\3%E[4\3%F[3\2%G[6\5%H[6\4%IH7V0%J[1\4
%KH6H6%L[5\3%M[4\0%N[1\7%O[6\5%P[2\5%Qj3M7%Rj3O3%SQ5G7%TQ3U6
%Uo5M4%Vl0O1%WJ4I3%XQ2H3%YD3D4%ZG8G8%[J6U5%\Q0V0%]D5Z5%^H0V7
%_o7Q0%`m6P0%al0O2
)END

These shots are played with varying speed and spin. This part of the warmup is largely a confidence builder. These are common "must make" shots in actual play, so I like to make a bunch of 'em during my warmup.

When I've completed these drills I shoot a few end-to-end banks and maybe a couple of caroms. At this point I'm ready to play, and I like to get started right away--before the warmup wears off.

--D.M.

Ralph S.
03-14-2003, 07:02 AM
Where at in Indiana are you located TEXTBOOK?

Predator314
03-14-2003, 08:25 AM
This might sound dumb, but I've heard you all talk about playing the ghost in the past. I'm assuming this means you are playing an imaginary opponent. How does this work exactly?

heater451
03-14-2003, 09:01 AM
I sometimes do that, if I'm trying to "warm up" in a hurry. You get to hit more balls, with less pressure, than if you were practicing with a friend.

I think it helps more with getting your muscles ready (getting your stroke in), and makes you more relaxed for the upcoming match.

If you find that you're not able to 'tune-in' this way, then a more structured style of practice will probably help. This enables you to work on your focus (for aim, or any part that's "out"), until you get in your comfort zone.

Of course, your warm-up procedure is dependent on various things, some of which relate to your shooting style/personality, and your dedication to winning/doing well.


=====================

Popcorn
03-14-2003, 09:09 AM
You are doing exactly the right thing. All your warm up has to be positive. You want to feed all your senses positive input, feel the balls going in, hear the balls going in, feel comfortable at the table, and so on. This is not a practice session, you don't do experimenting or work on your fundamentals. Just loosen up and play with a positive clear mind, no negative. If you are going to be playing a 9-ball match, don't be trying to run racks and pressuring yourself or shooting hard shots. Everything in the warm-up must be easy and positive.

Popcorn
03-14-2003, 09:18 AM
This sounds like a practice session, I never had a tournament director give me more then ten minutes to get warmed up. Suppose you start out missing all those spot shots, aren't you feeding your mind negative feedback?

bluewolf
03-14-2003, 09:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> This sounds like a practice session, I never had a tournament director give me more then ten minutes to get warmed up. Suppose you start out missing all those spot shots, aren't you feeding your mind negative feedback? <hr /></blockquote>

YUP. I personally do not like much warm up. I knock in a couple of racks at home on my eight foot the day of the match. When I go to league, I just hit a couple of long straight ins since it is a 9 foot table. Sometimes I get the chance to hit a rack with a teamate before time to start playing. If someone asks me to practice more, I do not. It just seems that if I do not hit great in warmup it will mentally affect the match. My match play is usually somewhat more focussed so I am just needing to hit a couple for my stroke and a long ball for the longer table.

Maybe more experienced players benefit from more warmup but for me it does not work.I like walking up to the table feeling fresh with no preconceptions.

Laura

Wally_in_Cincy
03-14-2003, 09:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> You are doing exactly the right thing. All your warm up has to be positive. You want to feed all your senses positive input, feel the balls going in, hear the balls going in, feel comfortable at the table, and so on. This is not a practice session, you don't do experimenting or work on your fundamentals. Just loosen up and play with a positive clear mind, no negative. If you are going to be playing a 9-ball match, don't be trying to run racks and pressuring yourself or shooting hard shots. Everything in the warm-up must be easy and positive. <hr /></blockquote>

Actually he's saying just the opposite of what you recommend.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote snipershot:</font><hr> Lately Before playing (any game), to warm up I've just been throwing balls onto the table and just randomly shooting whatever, I like this because <font color="red">I can shoot combos, jumps, anything I really want that I might run into in a game</font color>. I've also set up clusters and problem balls on purpose so that I'm totally prepared come game time. Who else has tried this and do you think it's a good way to warm up? <hr /></blockquote>

I agree with Popcorn. Jeanette Lee says the same thing. Warmup should be mostly easy shots. Just something to get your elbow greased up. You don't want to undermine your confidence before the match even starts.

Rod
03-14-2003, 10:13 AM
The Ghost never misses. I play the ghost a race to ten. Break the balls, take BIH only once after the break and run out from there. If I miss or scratch on the break I lose that game.

Structure it how ever you want, you could have ball in hand twice or more if you choose. Or you can throw out balls starting out with fewer balls etc. Start with something that is a challenge but you have a fair chance of winning.

Rod

Rod
03-14-2003, 10:37 AM
For myself I'll go to another room if necessary to warm up and I usually do. I'll warm up on big tables then go to a bar table tournament. I know how the tourney tables play so the change is not a big deal.
When I was younger and played over 300 days a year I just jumped up and played. Times change and I play a lot less so I know what I need to be ready. If on a very rare occasion I don't have that time then throwing balls out works best for me. The original question was in general, not before a tournamment. Now that you mention that, in my area there is usually at least one hour if not two, to practice at the room before a tourney. I just prefer to warm up elsewhere and not be bothered during that time.

Rod

wolfsburg2
03-14-2003, 11:20 AM
any time i shoot i throw balls out on the table first, shooting 8ball against myself with bih. after a couple of racks i go to 9 ball. for league, i play a couple of warm up games during practice. i am early every week just to make sure i get the time to warm up.

Rod
03-14-2003, 11:32 AM
That's the important part, being there early. From my experience I see many league and tournament players show up at the last minute. Then they wonder why or get mad when they miss. Being in a rush to get there and then try slowing down just doesn't set well with pool.

Rod

Popcorn
03-14-2003, 11:36 AM
You are right I did not understand his post. Thanks

Leviathan
03-14-2003, 03:00 PM
Hi, Popcorn.

The warmup I described seems to work for me, but it might be poison for other players. I wouldn't know. You're probably right about this; you've got the experience.

About confidence: sure I'm gonna miss some spot shots, but I know that going in, so why would missing bother me? I try to be realistic about my game. Shooting 30 spot shots helps prepare me to play, so I shoot 'em!

Regards,
D.M.

03-15-2003, 08:54 PM
What's a warm up, I jump up on the pool table, knock in two balls with my nose or paw, and I am ready to rock &amp; rolla. It don't take a Rolls Royce long to warm up.
Wonder Dog.....