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Deniel
03-18-2003, 09:43 PM
I've been told to hold my cue light, but exactly how and what is holding a cue light means anyway? I've seen a guy in my local pool hall hold his cue using just half of his thumb, index and middle finger, he doesn't wrap the cue in his hand so his fingers don't meet. I tried that grip and every time I stroke, I fear that the cue would "jump" out of my hand /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

The way I do it now, is I hold the cue rather tightly (not too thight) with my thumb and my index finger, I wrap them both up around the cue (they meet) and the rest of the finger little bit light. Somehow I doubt that I'm doing it right, so any suggestion anyone?

03-18-2003, 10:40 PM
The guy at the poolhall sounds about right. You are probably holding it too tight. Here's how I hold it and I think the correct way, although there can be several variations. Your pinky should be pretty much nonexistent, your thumb, index, and middle finger are really all you need to hold it. I use my other finger but lighter than the thumb, index, and middle. Your thumb and other fingers shouldn't meet around the cue. My fingers are almost at the bottom of the cue while my thumb is directly on the opposite side. Hope this helps!

03-18-2003, 11:59 PM
On the same topic... When you stroke with the cue, should the wrist be held lose or tight?

Deniel
03-19-2003, 12:49 AM
Hey there 9BallJr, thanks for answering
So you're saying that I should hold the cue using my Index and middle finger almost at the bottom of the cue and my thumb on the top of the cue?

Rod
03-19-2003, 02:07 AM
Deniel,
There is more than one way to hold the cue, it's your option. Light pressure like, holding a small bird or enough pressure when holding the cue upright so it doesn't slip.

Cradle the cue in the last two joints of your index and middle fingers, it's ok if the index and thumb meet. Just don't squeeze and pull it up into the palm of your hand.

Another option, hold it with your two middle fingers in the last two joints. In either case the rest of the fingers go along for the ride. They won't do much more than rest on the cue. There are more options in detail but the main point is a light grip. Your shoulder, upper and lower arm including the wrist should form a straight line at address. Your elbow will of course be bent and stationary as possible during the stroke. View this from above or behind with the cue under your chin. You should buy a book on the basics so you'll know what proper grip, stance and alignment looks like.

Rod

9 Ball Girl
03-19-2003, 07:27 AM
Here's a test:

1. Get down in your stance, holding your cue as if you're about to shoot.

2. Without adjusting the grip on your cue, lift it.

3. If you can lift it with no problem, then you're holding it too tight. If you find that you cannot lift it and wind up having to adjust your grip to lift it, then you should be ok.

Hope that helps!

Scott Lee
03-21-2003, 12:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deniel:</font><hr> Hey there 9BallJr, thanks for answering
So you're saying that I should hold the cue using my Index and middle finger almost at the bottom of the cue and my thumb on the top of the cue? <hr /></blockquote>

The thumb should NEVER be on the top of the cue. It needs to curl around the side. Having the thumb on top, will impede the natural, easy backswing, that is necessary for a good smooth stroke.

Scott Lee

bluewolf
03-21-2003, 01:27 AM
I let my cue rest in my fingers with the pinky curled around the cue but not really touching. The thumb is curled around the cue and barely touches my middle finger.The v on top of the hand which is between the thumb and first finger is straight in line with the cue.

I am no expert, but my grip is very light and this feels comfortable and the stroke swings naturally.

Others have a slightly stronger grip than me and their wrist is in more or out depending what is natural. As long as the stroke swings back and forth in a pendulum motion and swings straight , the grip of other folks seems to work for them.

Laura

Rod
03-21-2003, 03:57 AM
[ QUOTE ]
The thumb should NEVER be on the top of the cue. It needs to curl around the side. Having the thumb on top, will impede the natural, easy backswing, that is necessary for a good smooth stroke.

<hr /></blockquote>

Hi Scott,
I agree it should never be there. Strange enough a friend that plays real good has his thumb almost on top, very strange. I've never seen anyone else that I remember doing that.

Rod

Troy
03-21-2003, 07:11 AM
When I was about age 15, an "old man" gave me many pointers. One was that he noticed that my wrist was NOT straight so he gave this training technique ---
1. Hold the cue normally, but with the thumb on top. The idea is that with the thumb on top your wrist MUST be straight.
2. Then rotate the thumb to the grip position WITHOUT curling the wrist.

Periodically I still do this excercise just to be sure my wrist is straight. And it's been many, MANY years since that lesson... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr>
The thumb should NEVER be on the top of the cue. It needs to curl around the side. Having the thumb on top, will impede the natural, easy backswing, that is necessary for a good smooth stroke.
Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>

Deniel
03-23-2003, 09:05 PM
Thank you all for answering. I think I'm beginning to feel comfortable with how I'm holding it. Basically I have my thumb and my index finger wrap the cue light, and let it rest on the rest of my fingers

Troy, great idea!!! I'm giving it a try rite away ^___^

03-26-2003, 05:01 PM
[Basically I have my thumb and my index finger wrap the cue light, and let it rest on the rest of my fingers]

You guys should feel lucky that you can use your thumbs! I broke my wrist (of my gripping hand) and played pool without the advantage of an opposable thumb. I would wrap my middle finger, ring finger, and pinky on top and had my pointer finger underneath. After a week or so, I go pretty used to shooting that way. However, when I got my cast off, it felt great to hold the cue the normal way again.

Mike

"We should all sleep more soundly if we made it a rule to play billiards an hour or two each evening."

-English physician Sir Astley Cooper

Deniel
03-26-2003, 09:47 PM
Ouch..
Well I hope no permanent damage there

TomBrooklyn
03-27-2003, 03:15 AM
The way it was explained to me by my instructor was to hold the cue with the amount of pressure you would hold a small bird. Swing the cue and don't break the bird's neck.

He said a famous pool player of yore said there are two pressures that can be used to hold the cue. Light and lighter. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I can't remember who he was quoting, but it was great player.