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cheesemouse
03-22-2003, 08:00 AM
Are you a range monster

Those of us that are combination poolplayers/golfers know what I mean by 'range monster'. But for those that are not famliliar with the term it is a person who spends an inordinate amount of time practicing his/her game on the driving range but can't take his/her game to the course. They seem to forget everything they've been working on in that five or ten minute period that transpires going from the range to the pressure of the 1st teebox. It is a common place phenomenon in the golf world. One would think that these same range monsters would question what they are doing if their house of cards, what they practice, falls apart over and over on that 1st teebox and would change their range sessions to reflect something that ends up useful on the actual playing field but in most cases they don't do that but rather stubbornly stay with what they're doing on the range...My point and question is I think this same phenomenon exists in the pool world but I don't know a common name for it in the pool sport. I suppose in the pool world it would be those players that practice their a$$ off but in actual competitive situations all their hard work just doesn't show up.........GOTTA A GOOD NAME FOR THIS PHENOMENON?????????? /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Tom_In_Cincy
03-22-2003, 08:19 AM
I don't think I have ever seen this in the pool world, but I've seen a lot of it in the golf world.

I guess there is more opportunity in the pool world to overcome the competition gitters, than there is in the golf world. Just my opinion.

Besides, the range is NOT a real golf course, the pool practice table (unless it the one in your home) is much closer to the real thing than the "practice range"

Wally_in_Cincy
03-22-2003, 11:32 AM
I don't see that too much.

The folks that actually make the effort to practice pool (a minority IMO) usually become pretty good players, predicated on their natural ability of course.

Wally~~has more practice time than natural ability. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Predator314
03-23-2003, 09:17 AM
It's just a mental thing. I used to have that problem in golf. Soon you learn to clear your head and muscle memory takes over.

I've never really had that problem in pool. I used to have problems shooting under pressure, but now I thrive on it. I play better against better players. I play better in the bigger tournaments. I play better in higher stakes money games.

03-23-2003, 01:46 PM
Pool or golf, I call it choking. JMO.

Alfie
03-23-2003, 04:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cheesemouse:</font><hr> GOTTA A GOOD NAME FOR THIS PHENOMENON? <hr /></blockquote> Remember this one- a $X champ and a $2X chump? X keeps changing with inflation.

Fran Crimi
03-23-2003, 06:49 PM
Yup. I think I know exactly what you're referring to. I've seen it in pool too. I call them drill masters. They do a reality flip-flop where their practice becomes their reality and actually playing the game itself becomes something alien. They cocoon themselves in their rigid practice routines to the point where their comfort zone is only in their practice environment. Kind of like practicing to practice, I guess. That's a tough one to kick.

Fran

bluewolf
03-23-2003, 07:39 PM
It is called, 'not being able to fly by the seat of your pants' /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Laura

smfsrca
03-23-2003, 09:22 PM
This phenomenon is an extremely complex combination of mental, physical and spritual properties sometimes referred to a competative toughness.

bluewolf
03-24-2003, 05:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> Yup. I think I know exactly what you're referring to. I've seen it in pool too. I call them drill masters. They do a reality flip-flop where their practice becomes their reality and actually playing the game itself becomes something alien. They cocoon themselves in their rigid practice routines to the point where their comfort zone is only in their practice environment. Kind of like practicing to practice, I guess. That's a tough one to kick.

Fran <hr /></blockquote>

I think in practice, people tend to practice drills and even if their play involves 'the ghost',the play the ghost the way that is natural to them when there are probably a million combinations that can come up in pool.

A person plays a safety game you have never seen before.
The strategy can be so odd, you are left with 'huh'.
They get you off pace forcing you to play their pace.
etc

If a person has practiced a certain way, drilled a certain way, which most of us do, then we are often faced with different paces, strategies, position play and other things I cant even imagine that we are not used to.

At that point we have to be able to adjust, be flexible, adapt, go with the flow. This is what I call 'flying by the seat of my pants'.

The next best thing I think is to seek out players to practice with who play totally different from us to give more breadth and depth to our game.

May be this is not that profound to some more experienced players, but it is something I am discovering in my own evolution as a player. Dagumit, Fran always says stuff better than me. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Laura

bluewolf
03-24-2003, 05:46 AM
Just a personal addendum from our thurs night apa:

1) Our five played the other team's five. Our five skillwise is better. Good at pots, great at banks, shape etc.

The other player slowed the games way down with all of this strategy and defensive play. Our guy is used to playing fast and running out. The slower playing, safety player totally frustrated our guy to the point that his game fell apart and the other guy won.

2) Same thing happened in my match.She was a four and is used to just knocking the balls in and winning. She can even bank and do simple combos, long cut shots, etc. My shots recently improved but she was a bit better at shape and skillwise seemed a bit better. But again, I slowed the game way down with strategy and safes that looked like misses and some were so odd, she did not know what the h I was doing. This girl who was a fine shooter fell apart in the same way that our five did.

That is why I think it is important to seek these people out. Being the slower, more strategic player, I am used to the typical faster players. I plan on seeking that five out who plays like me only at a higher level of strategy, not only to help me with strategy but to see what I can do or learn with someone who is a higher player than me and to expose myself to that kind of play in another person.

I saw this a lot in karate. Offense vs defense type player and how the defense type usually messed up the offense players. The answer was to practice with all types of players.

Still there are many more permutations but playing with those who are different that me does, I think, add a demention of the ability to adapt in my game.

sorry if I was verbose.

Laura

Alfie
03-24-2003, 03:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> I've seen it in pool too. I call them drill masters. <hr /></blockquote>Ha! I like that.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> They do a reality flip-flop where their practice becomes their reality and actually playing the game itself becomes something alien. They cocoon themselves in their rigid practice routines to the point where their comfort zone is only in their practice environment. Kind of like practicing to practice, I guess. That's a tough one to kick. <hr /></blockquote>I know this is not what you and cheese are talking about, but maybe for a very few it becomes like a yogic thing. Are there such things as yoga competitions? ...anybody?