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View Full Version : Reflecting Back On Your Pool Growth



Sid_Vicious
03-22-2003, 08:58 AM
I got to thinking about the migration of my skills after "the studying while over the CB thread", remembering my earlier days of pool schools along with the beginning days of posting here on the original CCB and I realized that similarities exist between the player I used to be and some of the ones posting here who I sense are where I was back then. Mainly I have internalized many things, first that the followup advice from several here over fundamentals are exactly what mine were years back. That's what I was taught, drilled into my head, words that I paid good money for and was going to me dammed if I did not make those words bloom in value cuz "I'm the student and they are the veterans." Now as I begin to scan through the years and review my personal roadmap I find the individualism of my game, the things you "find and feel" rather than what the instructors teach you, and these things without much doubt conflict with those hammered in fundamentals(imo.) Without pretending to be a champion I'd like to ask "Do you veterans also see that breaking the taught rules has been your path to another level sometimes?" As I have said before, "There is a time to begin being the player you've studied to be, away from being the student." I'll bet that these phases of growth during studying this sport is fairly common, especially since we are now equipped with so much common information." sid

Tom_In_Cincy
03-22-2003, 09:49 AM
Sid,

Do you have any specific examples of what you were taught that conflict with what you have learned since that lesson?

Instructors, that are qualified to teach this game, usually start with the very basic fundamentals that will help the students learn more about 'their' game quicker than just trial and error.

NO instructor that I know of, can take a player and make them a pro in a few lessons. IMO the only thing a good instructor can do is teach a student how to learn the game quicker and enjoy it more.

Its up to the student to expand the lesson(s) at the practice table and under competitive conditions. Learning how to learn from your experiences is a great attribute.

If your game has improved because you tried something different from what you've been taught, this is a good thing. I wonder where you might be now if you hadn't taken any lessons?

Ward
03-22-2003, 12:09 PM
Sid

I try to get comfortable. If a BCA instructor where to watch me they would probably change everything I do.I play the way I do because it is what I learned in the 60's at Ft. Hood, that was the first time I was exposed to really good players. Roadies coming through on payday and a lot of GI's from the different parts of the US.

I know in my case I start having problems when I stop thinking. I believe when you get to a certain level you know how to make balls and play position then it is a mental game. I think the hardest part is staying relaxed and calm. The one thing I try to do is slow the game down.

Later

Rod
03-22-2003, 06:05 PM
[ QUOTE ]
." Now as I begin to scan through the years and review my personal roadmap I find the individualism of my game, the things you "find and feel" rather than what the instructors teach you, and these things without much doubt conflict with those hammered in fundamentals(imo.) Without pretending to be a champion I'd like to ask "Do you veterans also see that breaking the taught rules has been your path to another level sometimes?" <hr /></blockquote>

In general instructors should give you the fundamentals or a shot fundamental so you "can" find and feel on your own. There are so many variables it would take years to cover all of them. Well unless you had a lesson every day!

Breaking the rules, dam right I break some rules. The rigid guidelines I've read about here and watched some BCA instructors teach ain't going to get there on some shots. I wont go any farther but we all have our method, and opinions will vary. The final answer is in the results. This isn't the military and we don't always go by THE BOOK. Reaching another level because of it might be in question. Making that "special" shot that wins the game or set though is not in question.

Rod

jjinfla
03-22-2003, 06:58 PM
Sid, I think you still do things the same way you were taught except now it has been burned into your memory and you just do it without thinking about it. As you say, you feel it. And yes, that would be another level up for you. And if I would have known there were so many levels to this game when I first started studying it I don't think I would ever have started. And the worst part is that I don't even have any idea how many levels there are. Jake