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View Full Version : Finding a Straight Pool Cue



sneakypapi
03-27-2003, 01:20 AM
I was wondering if anyone had a true test to determine the straightness of a pool cue. I have heard no pool cue is perfectly straight, but many good cues will come to close and reasonable tolerance. The tried and true test I have used was to roll the cue on the table and check the tip area for it to roll without a noticeable wobble up and down. Of course, some slate pool tables can be off slightly as well. Also, I realize that pool cues will have different tapers and this will effect the roll and the space under the shaft when you look directly under it as it rolls. One question have is this, when rolling the cue should you look at the middle of the taper and see if it moves up and down? and should be straight and constant? or is that not a proper way to check the roll? I have read that a slight warp is not going to effect playability and it could be a mental idea in a person's head? Another tidbit I wanted to share with people is even some $1000 and above pool cues can and will be off in terms of straightness (not all of course). I have seen cues at the Valley Forge show that did not roll as a person should expect for the money.

q4summit
03-27-2003, 02:02 AM
Most everything I have read in books, read online, or had the chance to talk to people about say that the straightness of the stick doesn't matter nearly as much as the tip. You can compensate for the straightness, you can't compensate the tip.

Marc

03-27-2003, 03:57 AM
It's just funny to see these guys who only check a cue from the rack only by rolling it on the table. The slate has othing to do it, and a little wobble here and there won't make any difference. The way you should do it is lining down on the cue and rolling it in you hand.

On a house cue, check the tip first. Then test how it feels in your hand. Then maybe check if it's straight.

I mean mostly it's your stroke that is crooked, not the cue! If you can't see it's warped when you shoot, it doesn't matter.

bluewolf
03-27-2003, 05:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr> I was wondering if anyone had a true test to determine the straightness of a pool cue. I have heard no pool cue is perfectly straight, but many good cues will come to close and reasonable tolerance. <hr /></blockquote>

Interesting topic. We have two old sceptre cues that fail slightly the roll on the table test.They play just fine.

I have two predators,one is a bk. They both have the 314 shaft. This shaft is known for not warping.

I have two blackhearts, a custom maker. They have no warpage because he carefully selects the cut of the wood and lets the wood season for a long time.Also it is the way he puts his shafts together.Neither is an expensive stick.

I know other cues are straight too but you will have to hear about that from others.

The only sure test I know is to get a cue maker to check it out on their equipment. One thing though, a cue maker put one of our sceptres on his equipment, we were going to get him to take it from a 13 to a 12.75. He said he could not do it because it was warped, yet it played just fine.

Go figure.

Laura

Fred Agnir
03-27-2003, 08:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr> The tried and true test I have used was to roll the cue on the table <hr /></blockquote>This hasn't been the tried and true test since... well... never.

If you must roll, roll it such that part is on the cushion, and part is on the table. Other than that, sighting down the shaft and turning it as you sight is a better indicator of straightness, IMO.

Fred

03-27-2003, 11:01 AM
If you are talking about a two-piece cue you should check each part separate. If you are rolling it for instance check the shaft with it detached from the butt. Sometimes the joint may be off while neither section is warped. I have a jump/break cue and it screws together crooked all the way until it is completely tight so if it is even the slightest bit loose at the joint the cue will roll as if it is not straight.

TomBrooklyn
03-28-2003, 01:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>a cue maker put one of our sceptres on his equipment, we were going to get him to take it from a 13 to a 12.75. <hr /></blockquote>I thought making the diameter smaller would aid in making it straighter. The diameter and roundness would vary some in the finished product though. Maybe thats what he wanted to avoid.