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04-01-2003, 04:03 PM
After raising the grain of the ding, how does one get the raised area to blend with the surrounding area of the shaft? TIA.

L.S. Dennis
04-01-2003, 04:08 PM
I assume you're talking about the physical aspects of the area ana not the color. In this case try some very fine steel wool or some fine sand paper (12 or 1500 grit).

cycopath
04-01-2003, 04:30 PM
Once I have the ding area raised and completely dry I use 1000 grit and then 2000 grit sandpaper. If necessary I'll also use a Cue Doctor glass rod to smooth the area after initial sanding.

04-01-2003, 05:27 PM
Thanks psyco. Where can I get my hands on sandpaper this fine?

04-01-2003, 05:29 PM
thanks for the reply dennis. Yes, the physical aspects. I would like to be able to run my hand over this area and not be able to distinguish where the ding was.

Rod
04-01-2003, 05:46 PM
Captain,
The best place I know of is auto paint & body supply stores.

cycopath
04-01-2003, 07:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote captain:</font><hr> Thanks psyco. Where can I get my hands on sandpaper this fine? <hr /></blockquote>Any good hardware store.

TomBrooklyn
04-01-2003, 07:20 PM
After I raise the grain on a dings, I don't seem to get any bumps. I usually sand with 1000-1200-1500-2000-leather burnish anyway at this time as it seems like a good time to do it as a general cleaning and smoothing proceedure and just in case there are bumps from the removed dings that I can't feel.

Hopster
04-01-2003, 07:41 PM
Whats the best way to raise the ding area ?

cycopath
04-01-2003, 08:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Hopster:</font><hr> Whats the best way to raise the ding area ? <hr /></blockquote>Depending on how bad the ding is, you can use a little steel wool or sandpaper to scuff the ding and wet it. Just enough to cover that area you scuffed. And let it sit until dry.
On a real bad ding I'll use a jewelry steam cleaner to blast the area with hot steam to get the wood to really puff up.

Hopster
04-01-2003, 09:08 PM
Depending on how bad the ding is, you can use a little steel wool or sandpaper to scuff the ding and wet it. Just enough to cover that area you scuffed. And let it sit until dry.
On a real bad ding I'll use a jewelry steam cleaner to blast the area with hot steam to get the wood to really puff up. &lt;---Cycopath

I had heard something about taking a hot cloth or piece of paper towel just big enough to cover the area of the ding and it would raise it but i never tried it so i dont know. Is this also a correct method ?

cycopath
04-01-2003, 10:12 PM
Yeah, same results.

Rod
04-01-2003, 10:24 PM
You can wet a cotton cue tip and place it over the ding. Re-wet every 15 minutes or so until the wood is raised. If it's not to bad it will come out after two or three times.

Hopster
04-02-2003, 02:38 AM
Thanks Cyco and Rod. I like the q tip idea, i have a small ding im going to try it out on.

04-03-2003, 04:26 PM
Used the q tip. Works pretty well for little nicks but gets quite tedious with bad dings. Thanks again for all of your replies.

Rod
04-03-2003, 05:40 PM
Major collision eh? Steam from a tea pot or something. Personally I use a steam iron sparingly for those nasty ones.

04-04-2003, 04:18 PM
Yeah, leaned my cue against a chair for a sec to reach into my pocket and I got bumped. I've got two dings that are more like holes now.

As far as steam goes, I tried it on an old crappy shaft I have and it effected too big of an area on the shaft. It didn't screw it up or anything, in fact it raised the dent beautifully. The thing is that it just kind of made the shaft grainy. Being that I don't have a lathe handy, it's kind of a pain to burnish an area larger than a penny.