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04-02-2003, 09:53 PM
My son was looking at some laser cue stick online. ummm I have never seen this but I wanted to know what you think of this and will it even teach him anything? what's your opinion?

I am telling him just take a reg cue stick and figure it out.

9 Ball Girl
04-02-2003, 11:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Hawaiian Fantasy:</font><hr> I am telling him just take a reg cue stick and figure it out. <hr /></blockquote>

[b]How about your son get some lessons from an Open/Pro player? Just figuring it out can be very frustrating if you're a beginner with no direction and I would definitely take advantage of the resources that are out there today--instructional videos, books, and of course instructors. I checked a list of BCA Certified Instructors and couldn't find anyone in Hawaii. Maybe your local poolhall has a house pro or house instructor or they can recommend someone? JMO

How old is your son, by the way? If I only knew the people I know today when I started out back then...But you know what they say, Better Late Than Never! Good luck!

Rod
04-03-2003, 12:41 AM
It is a worn out dying fad that teaches little. The most simple way of aiming is the ghost ball. There are other ways but as a beginner this simplifies the method. I set up a table with a spot shot. In this case the 5 ball is the ghost ball and shows where the c/b needs to strike the one ball to pocket it. This shot is a 1/2 ball hit. 1/2 of the c/b strikes 1/2 of the o/b or equal distance. The red line divides the one in half, the c/b line divides the 5 in half, of course the green line is the direction to the pocket. You can do this for any angle, a thin hit is less ball contact, say 1/4 ball or a more full hit say 3/4 ball etc. Open the table then copy the code and paste it to the table.

wei table (http://endeavor.med.nyu.edu/~wei/pool/pooltable2.html )

START(
%AN9O3%BR1Z3%CV0Z1%DR1Y2%EO8N3%FO5Y8%GS6X9%HP7X8%I T2Z3%Ph0E1
%UF0R1%Vk1C9%WE0Q2%XT6N3%YD6Z1%ZT8I1
)END

I'd suggest you buy your son a basic book on pool with illustrations on the stance, stroke and aiming. I'd also suggest you keep it limited at this time, to much information is not necessarily best. When possible seek out someone in your area for instruction, not someone that just plays pool.

Rod

TomBrooklyn
04-03-2003, 12:47 AM
I've never heard of a single person who used it, or a single person who's recommended it aside from the people that sell them.

However, my instructor has suggested I visualize an imaginary laser line from the CB to the OB along the aim line, and the OB to the pocket.

DSAPOLIS
04-03-2003, 01:30 AM
Tell him to save his (or your) money. The money can be better spent on lessons from a qualified instructor. I've also seen the "Rail Mirrors" or whatever they're called. None of these gadgets will help you during competition.

04-03-2003, 01:40 AM
Thank you all for your suggestions and for the diagram. On Sunday we will try this out.

It's sad but this island has no qualified instructors that I know of /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif. Heck it would even be nice to have adults shoot with kids and they all figure out the A's and B's on pool together, so long they are off the streets and staying out of trouble.

If any on you fine players are planning on a vacation to the Big Island of Hawaii, send me email hehehheheheh /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

bluewolf
04-03-2003, 05:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Hawaiian Fantasy:</font><hr> Thank you all for your suggestions and for the diagram. On Sunday we will try this out.

If any on you fine players are planning on a vacation to the Big Island of Hawaii, send me email hehehheheheh /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Since you are inviting us to come to Hawaii, maybe a good instructor would barter a deal with you /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif A vacation to hawaii in exchange for some great lessons /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Seriouly, your son does need a good instructor to make sure his fundamentals are right.

Just so you start knowing some of us, I am a relative beginner who has had very good instruction on the stroke and basics. My husband on the other hand, comes on here as whitewolf, is an advanced player.

As per your problem of instructors in your area, I know that in my town there is a very good op/9 ball player who teaches. There is probably someone like that in your area. I would start talking to the good pool players in your area to see who they recommend.

There is another option but it is kind of expensive. Randy g has a great pool school. If you can afford to fly both of you, take his pool school. Randy gives this school in dallas tx and also in other parts of the country. This is three days of intensive instruction on the basics your son needs and you would like it too.

There are also others like scott lee and fast larry who travel all over the country. I think that you can get your son what he needs, either locally, flying to randys pool school or working with one of these personal instructors who travel.

And I considered gimmics too in the beginning but they are at best quick fixes and do not transfer to playing pool correctly.

Once a person has a good stroke, it is a matter, it seems, of shooting a lot and developing a memory of certain shots.

My step daughter is 10. I have worked with her some. We vary the game so that she gets to pocket balls and she always wins. This is to keep up her interest and give her positive feelings about pool.

Goodluck

Laura

TomBrooklyn
04-03-2003, 05:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>your son does need a good instructor to make sure his fundamentals are right.<hr /></blockquote>I'll stipulate that instruction is good, but is it possible to develop good fundamentals without an instructor? I'll submit that different persons could have different levels of need vis-a-vis instruction based on, amongst other things, the level of their interest and motivation, their ability to self start and work without supervision, reading and video comprehension, cognative association, hand-eye coordination, and their tenacity and determination.

bluewolf
04-03-2003, 05:55 AM
I sent you a private message (PM). If you do not know how to open these, post back here and someone will help you with that.

On ccb, we have pm within the software. The messages are found in the same place, your home, where you set up your profile. The fact that you were able to load your pic indicates that you are computer saavy. The other way to communicate is through email. If you see a person's name beside their post and click on it, it will take you to their profile. If the person has their email addresss listed then you can contact them on their email.

Laura

bluewolf
04-03-2003, 06:01 AM
There are some people who naturally have a good stroke. My step daughter naturally has a decent stroke. A good instructor would make it better though. The problem with her though it that she is soooo sensitive, that she has to be handled with kid gloves. Her stroke, brigde grip all of that need improvement but for a ten year old, is okay. Later, when whe has more confidence, she can get instruction.

But, I believe that some people are so talented, they probably came out of the womb stroking the ball. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Laura

beerwolf
04-03-2003, 07:30 AM
I don't think the laser-sighted cue would be of any significant usefulness. It is extremely important to learn how to send the cue ball precisely where you think it should go. The laser cue permits you to send the cue ball where you want regardless of where you put your head and how your eyes are aligned relative to the cue. Therefore it bypasses what is probably the most important part of the learning process by doing it automatically for you. It should make the game more fun by taking most of the difficulty out of it but it will retard any real development in skill.

Laser pointers are small and cheap. Why not buy one and just tape it to a cue? I suspect the novelty would wear off soon.

The device would be very useful if it could be used to check head alignment. That is, you find a routine for aligning your head and eyes for something like a long straight shot. When your aim looks right you turn the laser sight on to see if your alignment is correct. Make adjustments until you have a reproducible method of getting perfect alignment. That could take months or years off the learning curve. Unfortunately, the device does not offer that capability but I might make one that does.

Be careful about what Laura says. You will notice that she responded three times to this thread even though she says and probably knows absolutely nothing about the topic of the thread. Give us a break, Laura!
BW

9 Ball Girl
04-03-2003, 07:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Hawaiian Fantasy:</font><hr> If any on you fine players are planning on a vacation to the Big Island of Hawaii, send me email hehehheheheh /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

I'll take you up on that! /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Back to the task at hand, a nifty inexpensive way to make sure that your stroke is straight is to set up a soda bottle on a *pool table and have him stroke his cue into the opening of the bottle, making sure that he doesn't touch the sides.

*If you can't get to a pool table, try placing the bottle on an ironing board and adjust it for his height.

Kato
04-03-2003, 08:31 AM
Better make sure that bottle is plastic /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif and empty /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Start by trying to get him some beginning instructional books and video tapes. If he mimics the people in those videos and illustrations in the book and follows the instruction he'll have the correct fundamentals and develop a good stroke. I think hoping on a plane to Dallas is a bit overkill for a kid that hasn't spent any time on a table.

If there is anything specific I can help you with PM me. If I don't know the answer I'll find it out for you.

Kato~~~jus bein' neighborly

PS. Have your son log on and ask some of his own questions. Might be truly enjoyable for him /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif and a nice learning experience for the both of you. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

04-03-2003, 02:44 PM
http://www.tracylyn.com/~ohanasims/osemotes/laugh.gif @ 9 ball girl [ QUOTE ]
I'll take you up on that! <hr /></blockquote>

I must say you have some very good suggestions,
[ QUOTE ]
Back to the task at hand, a nifty inexpensive way to make sure that your stroke is straight is to set up a soda bottle on a *pool table and have him stroke his cue into the opening of the bottle, making sure that he doesn't touch the sides.*If you can't get to a pool table, try placing the bottle on an ironing board and adjust it for his height. <hr /></blockquote> and I also read somewhere where you talked about imagine a glass of water on your arm. This is something I would have never thought of.

I think some things can be self taught but the aide of an instructor (learning fundamentals) would really help him. I assume that if goes without help, he will loose interest if he can't figure out why the heck his balls won't go in http://www.tracylyn.com/~ohanasims/osemotes/cry.gif .

I am loving the fact that he is taking an interest in this, it's weening him off of his bad influence friends that he made when we moved to the big island from maui almost a year ago, but it's heart breaking at the same time watching him do without the things he needs to advance. Last night he took my broom stick and my dogs tennis ball and was practicing with that on my table OMG!LOL. I can't wait for those books and video's to come in.

KATO: ROTFLMAO!!!! I will make sure the bottle plastic and empty http://www.tracylyn.com/~ohanasims/osemotes/laugh.gif However, you stated that I should have my son log on and ask his own questions.....that means I have to share my computer LMAO! but I will let him do that when he gets home, I had him read the forum a few times but he gets fustrated sifting through all the posts, He asked me to make him his own forum, I guess he gets over whelmed reading CCB LOL

Thank you all for your great support and taking the time to educate us. http://www.tracylyn.com/~ohanasims/osemotes/hugs.gif

Kato
04-03-2003, 02:58 PM
Come now Mrs. Fantasy, sometimes in life we must share. He will share in your computer and you will share in his enthusiasm and his victories on the pool table. The CCB does get a bit overwhelming from time to time. I'm pretty sure the information will be worth it.

Kato~~~http://216.40.249.192/s/contrib/lilly/hmm3grin3thumborange.gifHelpful

SpiderMan
04-03-2003, 03:38 PM
Hi,

A nice lady who goes by "Karatemom" posts here frequently, and she has a son about 10 years old who plays pool quite a bit. He even won a tournament recently. You might consider sending her a private message, and perhaps she could share some of her experiences in maintaining her son's interest in the game.

By the way, I don't think I've ever seen Karatemom's son post here either. Maybe reading and responding is just a little too unexciting for a ten-year-old.

SpiderMan

04-03-2003, 03:42 PM
Yes I seen her post and I could feel her excitement.
As Kato stated, when my son wins I can share the victory...I anxiously await the day and I assure you in 5 years from now (if you all are still here heheheh) I will be running around this forum without a head screaming with joy. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Kato
04-03-2003, 03:50 PM
Actually Spidey, Christ is a registered member of the CCB. He will have to be to qualify for the CCB tournament in September.

Kato