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Sid_Vicious
04-04-2003, 03:21 PM
I won't go into details except to say that I am burned out from multiple league nights and a diminished, personal game which can only be described as "It sucks!", sooooo I am going to take a general break from most all of my usual pool events. I have one primary concern though, I've developed several great friends whom I usually play against off and on, and this pool break will possibly affect one or more of these over time. It's not as simple for me as intermittently joining back in every once in a while, I either need a serious break or I would have to try and stick it out, the last option being the one I have just exhausted "beyond all git." Getting beat around by friends isn't the ticket, yet how does one protect those friendships and still accomplish his "pool rest?" sid

Kato
04-04-2003, 03:27 PM
Can't you just go to the pool room and hang out for a little while. Make it a habit to just show up a few times a week? I'm not sure how to handle your situation but that's what I'd do.

Kato

04-04-2003, 03:45 PM
Sid,

Have been going through similar misery with my tennis game lately. Sick of running, tired of hauling out the ball machine, burned out on practicing as well as competition. How did I keep up with tennis pals? Played pool.

DSAPOLIS
04-04-2003, 03:50 PM
Sid,
Sound to me like you are punishing yourself rather than taking a break. Nothing says you should not go to the pool room during this break in playing. You can visit, sit, observe others and learn. What I do during my breaks is write about the things I am trying to improve upon. You can take a break and do absolutely nothing and get the just rewards for it. You could also take an honest inventory of the good and bad things in your game. Though you would not be playing physically, you could take giant steps in personal development by ironing out the mental side of your game and the flaws in your attitude towards playing. Usually when you are burnt out, there is more than one reason. Use the time to your advantage and when you return you will be a stronger, wiser player.

jjinfla
04-04-2003, 03:58 PM
Sid, If you lose your "friends" because you give up league night, well, then they really were not friends, just acquaintances. I wouldn't worry about that at all. But it sounds like you will miss the comraderie of league night. But, to me, league night is just too demanding. I just don't like the idea of having to be there every week. And it just never ends. So I just opt to play in different tournaments when I feel like it. If I am tired I just stay home. Can't do that if I belong to a league. Like someone else posted, take a break for two weeks, and then quit altogether. Jake~~~wish my game would be as good as your bad game.

Sid_Vicious
04-04-2003, 04:31 PM
Punishment either way I go with it though, playing or not,,,the fun has gone and it's just not pretty when you feel like I do during competition. Thanks for the suggestions...sid

SPetty
04-04-2003, 04:44 PM
Hi Sid,

The best thing you could do right now is to find a ready and willing pool player that needs and wants the benefit of your years of experience and knowledge - and go over to her place every weekend for six hours or so and mentor and teach her everything you know so that when she finally meets up with Karatemom, she won't be horribly humiliated in public.

I know someone like that if you're interested. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Karatemom
04-04-2003, 04:46 PM
Hiya Sid. Sounds like you do need a break, especially if it's just not fun anymore. Your friends should understand, and to hell with them if they don't! LOL. Take a couple weeks off, then if you like, start going up to the pool hall without your cue and sit and watch. I bet in no time, you'll be wishing you had brought your cue with you.

Am in a nasty slump myself at the moment, but leagues start up again here Tuesday and I can't wait!

Heide

Popcorn
04-04-2003, 05:38 PM
I think pool league should be only one aspect of your pool. Do you have a room where you play? Sometimes just go hang around and watch or practice by yourself, maybe match up with someone, just for a change of pace. I think just playing league all the time doesn't make you a rounded player and may even become boring.

Karatemom
04-04-2003, 06:29 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> Hi Sid,

The best thing you could do right now is to find a ready and willing pool player that needs and wants the benefit of your years of experience and knowledge - and go over to her place every weekend for six hours or so and mentor and teach her everything you know so that when she finally meets up with Karatemom, she won't be horribly humiliated in public.

I know someone like that if you're interested. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

<hr /></blockquote>
hahahahahahaha. Something tells me you won't have anything to worry about. At least until I'm out of this slump, then watch out!

Heide

TomBrooklyn
04-04-2003, 10:06 PM
Except for those people who play pool for work, playing pool is something generally done for enjoyment and so I assume it is with you. If you are not enjoying yourself, I can't think of any reason to continue doing it. I think you'll find you can work out something with your teams if you work on it with them.

Any friendships that are based on nothing but a pool league night sound rather one dimensional anyway, and some of these relationships might suffer. So what? You can make freinds wherever you go to spend your leisure time. And if you have friends that you feel are worth keeping, keep them. You'll think of other things to do with them. -Tom

bluewolf
04-05-2003, 08:58 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I won't go into details except to say that I am burned out from multiple league nights and a diminished, personal game which can only be described as "It sucks!", sooooo I am going to take a general break from most all of my usual pool events. sid <hr /></blockquote>

Hi sid. I have found in any sport, I can get into a 'crash and burn' syndrome. I dont know how the pros do what they do, practicing hours a day.

Even when I was at my peak in karate, going to class three times a week was okay, any more was crash and burn.

There was a time I was practicing pool more thatn 2 hours per say. This might not seem to be a lot but for me, I started to feel 'twisted' like I did not have a life and it was not fun.

Even though I have a pool table in my house, I do not do this anymore.Sometimes I knock in a few balls, other days I do drills and work hard. I think ww says he could play pool 4 hrs a day but he is not me.

Maybe I will not ever be as good as he is, but I hope to always enjoy the sport.

Both of us got invitations to play on additional apa teams and we declined. WW told me it would burn me out so much that I would not want to play pool.

The way it is now, I play pool pretty much, spend time with my dogs, family and other things I like and still am improving.

I agree that if a person is doing a sport to a very large degree and feel as you do, that you are declining, it is time to step way back. It is time to relax, do some fun things, maybe do some things with other friends. If your pool friends are real friends, they will still be your friends.

As painful as it is sometimes, stepping a way, at least to a degree from a pastime you had in common tells you who your real friends are. Real friends are a rare commodity, better than gold.

Laura

bluewolf
04-05-2003, 09:03 AM
One more thing. One time I did not play pool for several weeks because I had this 'bug'. When I picked the cue up again, I was playing better than when I laid it down. It seemed that I was in a mental rut about certain aspects. When I picked it back up I was playing more than thinking.

I am sure ww or somebody else could explain this better, like someone who has gone through this over many years of playing, but it even happened to me in my first year of pool.

Laura

Tom_In_Cincy
04-05-2003, 09:27 AM
Taking a break from playing will have only TWO results. Either you will come back playing just as bad or.... you will play WORSE.
Neither would be what I would want.

Developing a regimented practice routine that will keep your interest and also provide measurable means for improvement, may be a good alternet solution.

Basic stance.
Basic aiming.
Basic pre-shot routine
Basic shots

Then advance to more difficult practices

Advanced stance.. being jacked up on a rail or over a ball.
Advanced aiming.. using side english for short and long shots.
Advanced shots.. Banks, combo, caroms, safeties

(still using your pre-shot routine during all of these exercises)

I have found that playing thru bad times and focusing on what is going wrong is the only way to improve. Taking a break for me... is taking the weekend off..

Sid_Vicious
04-05-2003, 10:33 AM
I do appreciate the response, and I have "pressed on" trying to get through the down cycle(slumps) for a long LONG time, years it feels like. The highs are wonderful and yet when I can't pocket a ball 6" from a corner pocket trying to work back table shape, the plain jane stuff if you know what I mean...it begins to erode all of my game. It has been at least 2 years since I took a complete break from pool, but even visiting family over Christmas for a long week had me coming back stronger when I hit the felt again. Besides, I truly believe that the damage one does to his/her ego over and over again by looking "junior league" gets to be a bad habit in time. Sometimes it's simply best to back off, go watch top end players, and leave the lumber at home. That's just me, at least for today...sid

TomBrooklyn
04-05-2003, 10:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> Taking a break from playing will have only TWO results. Either you will come back playing just as bad or.... you will play WORSE. <hr /></blockquote>I am unable to assertain from your post Tom how you know that will happen to Sid. My experience has been just the opposite after layoffs in the area of a week to a month. You also seem to be focusing mostly on the area of improving, but Sids post is mainly about enjoying himself. Changing one's routine or working on different aspects of the game can add interest and is probably worth a try, but if it doesn't I am unconvinced that someone should torture themselves doing something they are not enjoying with their leisure time.

Rich R.
04-05-2003, 10:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr>Besides, I truly believe that the damage one does to his/her ego over and over again by looking "junior league" gets to be a bad habit in time. <hr /></blockquote>
Sid, maybe you are expecting to much of yourself. Unless you are making your living playing pool and playing at least 8 hours a day, you are an "amateur" pool player. You are allowed to play badly, at times. Inconsistency is why you are an amateur. Take it easy on your ego and remember that you are playing pool because you like the game and it is fun to play, regardless of the frustrations. Maybe try changing games for a while.

I think Tom gave you the best advise. If you choose not to follow it, have a good time with your break. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

TomBrooklyn
04-05-2003, 11:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I have "pressed on" trying to get through the down cycle(slumps) for a long LONG time. The highs are wonderful and yet when I can't pocket a ball 6" from a corner pocket trying to work back table shape, ...it begins to erode all of my game. ... I truly believe that the damage one does to his/her ego over and over again by looking "junior league" gets to be a bad habit..<hr /></blockquote>Often if I start shooting worse than I know I'm capable of, it has the effect of ruining my confidence also. Usually I find it is because I am not focused enough. When this occurs I just end the session because it is not fun and I feel no benefit in ingraining sloppy tendencies in my pool cpu. When I'm enthusiastic about playing the focus is usually there.

DSAPOLIS
04-05-2003, 11:28 AM
Sid,

Below is an excerpt from my book -The Growling Point- that deals with this issue. It is from the end of chapter 4, and I am explaining "training cycles".
================================================== =====



Schedules should be flexible as unexpected things occur during training periods. I also take breaks from pool. It is very easy to get overloaded and run down by any activity. That is why I space my training periods apart. I hit periods of time towards the end of a training period when I just want to get away from pool. I look at this as "Desire Burnout". I picture my desire as a stick of dynamite. I light the fuse at the beginning of a three month period and if I time it right, it should explode at the end of the three month period. That is why I set my goals up so that they are accomplished at the end of the training cycle. After the goal is accomplished, or at least attempted, I take a few weeks off and relax. Burnout can kill even the best of competitors. Look what happened to Jennifer Capriati earlier in her career. A classic case of burnout.
Look at Andre Agassi, a classic example of the results of taking a break, getting your life and life goals in order, then coming out and taking the world by storm. During my off-period, I don't even think about pool. I play tennis and golf, maybe I'll give a few classes to some local players but the main thing I do is relax. I don't take too much time off because if I did I might get lazy and I would never get back into shape mentally. Two to three weeks of nothing to do with pool is about the norm. It also gives me a chance to watch others . This teaches me how to sit in the chair and become teachable. I give classes because I know that to keep my own skills, I must teach. They say you got to give it away to keep it. I learn more about my own game by teaching others than anything else. I also give away what was freely given to me. The only thing I charge is the cost of the table. Nothing more.

PoolFool
04-05-2003, 12:04 PM
Sid, if you just want a change of pace but still be involved (watching or playing )you are always welcome to come by and play or talk. You know where I play just let me know and I will meet you. Also, I havn't done so yet but I plan to take a few lessons from a guy in Arlington. He charges by the lesson not by the clock. I think I will take a few lessons and practice alone for a few weeks. See what happens.

PoolFool

Sid_Vicious
04-05-2003, 12:18 PM
Thanks, you are a scholar and a gentleman, and add lots of constructive things to this board! I have an idea now about the immediate future after reading all of my responses, especially this one. It is odd that I can look back and remember giving similar advice and yet seem to struggle taking that same advice. We humans are strange creatures huh. sid~~~retired from serious pool, but not counting himself out for a comeback.

Sid_Vicious
04-05-2003, 12:37 PM
Yes that might be an idea, hooking up and bumpin' gums instead of playing pool. Right now I'm geared up to work some OT at work, complete some badly needed home projects, ride motorcycles and sideline pool, even the instructionals, for a while. Maybe I'll be ready to re-enter around the time Scott is in town, but as I calculate his timing he'll be outside my weekend freedoms so I may miss the encounter. I'll stay in touch with you, probably PM or e-mail...sid

Rod
04-06-2003, 02:28 PM
Take some time off Sid, everyone needs to once in a while. Enjoy other things in life. During that time evaluate what you should do to keep away from another burn out. If that's dropping a league or two, then that is what you do. You'll still see your friends, just not near as often. They will understand or their not really your friends.

I take breaks some are long but I always come back to enjoy the game. One thing I personally do is come back easy. Meaning I don't put any pressure on myself or play for any long length of time. I'll be rusty so I don't expect to play close to full speed. I'll get a little lazy and not foucus like I should but I accept that. I'll practice little draw shots comming off 1 rail for positon little more than 1/2 table length or short two rail follow shots etc. I need this time to regain my feel. My next time out always produces better results while working my way back into the subtile parts of the game. I'm not at full speed but I accept that. It's just a suggestion but you might consider a slower approach when you return or if you never leave. I find it much better to build my game and confidence if I don't fault every mistake. I just try to make my best stroke and not settle for second hand position. After three days I start playing pretty good.

I guess my point is playing several hours of friendly 9 ball after being away can frustrate a person if things don't go well. It may not help your fundamentals that are probably lacking to a degree anyway. Even if you do play fairly well will it be the same next time? Regain those fundamentals then play, I think it's the building blocks that serve us well in the long run. Just some thoughts.
What do you think?

Rod

Tom_In_Cincy
04-06-2003, 05:53 PM
There could be a 3rd result, After the layoff, you might be rid of the demon that was interferring with your performance and at least come back to the previous better level of a previous play.

But, I cannot see improving by not playing.

Sid_Vicious
04-06-2003, 07:13 PM
I think you may have hit one of the nails on the head, plus the lay off gives me time to feel worthy by actually fixing/balancing other parts of life besides pool. More self worth(in general) makes me feel better, and hopefully a player with a better attitude. I would not hazard to say a better game would be produced and yet I would suggest that "my best" game might begin to come back. I'd be happy with that...sid

SpiderMan
04-07-2003, 12:22 AM
Sid, Sid, it was so LONELY shooting all by myself on those diamond pros at Fox &amp; Hound last Friday! You didn't even stop in and say "Hi" when you stole the jack out of the back of my truck. You really mean this about abandoning your pool buddies?

SpiderMan