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View Full Version : Pool is Government Sponsored in Chinese Taipai !



bigbro6060
04-09-2003, 08:46 PM
No wonder they are producing so many top players with many more to come in the future

For pool to prosper, that is what is needed. Goverment run pool programs and support of developing players

We have an Australian Institute of sport which does a lot for many sports (e.g. athletics, swimming, cycling etc) but of course nothing for pool or snooker

Obvious some asian countries value pool as a sport more than other western countries, hence they deserve to have a sizeable number of players at the top

Vicki
04-09-2003, 09:09 PM
I don't know about all European countries but Holland has a team of pro pool players who receive compensation and benefits. I don't know all the details but it's my understanding that they are like government employees. I have had the pleasure of meeting several of the team members and they are all super nice, super smart guys.

I agree that government help would do a lot to advance the sport but I doubt we could get the bald heads in Washington to do much for pool.

I've often wondered why colleges/universities don't have pool teams that could compete against each other. That would be cool and could do wonders for getting pool more recognition.

Vicki

cycopath
04-09-2003, 09:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Vicki:</font><hr>I've often wondered why colleges/universities don't have pool teams that could compete against each other.<hr /></blockquote>That's a great idea! I never thought about the competitive aspect of pool teams in college.

Fran Crimi
04-09-2003, 09:41 PM
From what I've heard, that type of Gov't sponsorship as in Taipai, comes at a very big price. They keep very tight reigns on their players and allow them very little freedom. Once you get accepted into their program, they own you.

Fran

Vicki
04-09-2003, 09:48 PM
I have a friend who teaches an alternative program at a public high school here in the DC area. He and I have talked about implementing a pool program for his students but we have not actually done anything about it yet. It's gotta start somewhere and if it is done right it can take off from there. It's such a great sport that deserves to be played. I need to get off my ass.

Vicki

04-09-2003, 10:07 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Vicki:</font><hr>

I've often wondered why colleges/universities don't have pool teams that could compete against each other. That would be cool and could do wonders for getting pool more recognition.

Vicki <hr /></blockquote>
I'm not positive but I think some colleges do this. I think Texas A&amp;M does but I'm not sure of it.

Eric.
04-10-2003, 08:39 AM
Actually, there are some colleges that have Pool teams that compete. I believe some of them are in the Midwest(I'm too lazy to look it up).

Personally, I think that if several major (Division I) colleges got involved, this could become a "Farm system" for Olympic players, assuming that the Olympic committee ever gets Pool into center stage.


Eric &gt;looks good on paper

Wally_in_Cincy
04-10-2003, 08:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Eric.:</font><hr> Actually, there are some colleges that have Pool teams that compete. I believe some of them are in the Midwest(I'm too lazy to look it up).

Personally, I think that if several major (Division I) colleges got involved, this could become a "Farm system" for Olympic players, assuming that the Olympic committee ever gets Pool into center stage.


Eric &gt;looks good on paper <hr /></blockquote>

IIRC Jon Kucharo and Nick Varner are former collegiate champions

Fran Crimi
04-10-2003, 08:48 AM
I also got my start through the ACUI (I think that's what it was called, Assoc. of College Unions, Inc.). In fact that was my first trophy. Won the college championship, represented my college in the Regionals, won that and placed third in the Nationals. We played 14.1 back then.

From what I understand it's still around and operating as strong as ever.

Fran

Wally_in_Cincy
04-10-2003, 08:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> I also got my start through the ACUI (I think that's what it was called, Assoc. of College Unions, Inc.). In fact that was my first trophy. Won the college championship, represented my college in the Regionals, won that and placed third in the Nationals. We played 14.1 back then.

From what I understand it's still around and operating as strong as ever.

Fran

<hr /></blockquote>

Well what was your high run in that tourney? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Eric.
04-10-2003, 09:08 AM
I forgot, thanks!

IMO, College programs have traditionally been stepping stones to the "Big Leagues". Just look at Football, Baseball, Basketball, etc. Also, due to it's influence(read:parents with money) it would be a huge Institution backing the sport. I feel Pool should "go where they are" meaning; instead of trying to form your own group of players/enthusiasts, go where the group already is.

Eric

Nostroke
04-10-2003, 09:25 AM
That's right-They own you- Last year at the World Championships in Cardiff, C S Yang played consistently better than anyone there. He finished fourth, losing to Busta where he got to the table 3 times (pretty sure) in a race to 11. Anyway the word was "his government" was not going to let him come back this year. I didnt get any details but that was the word at Cardiff.

jjinfla
04-10-2003, 09:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> From what I've heard, that type of Gov't sponsorship as in Taipai, comes at a very big price. They keep very tight reigns on their players and allow them very little freedom. Once you get accepted into their program, they own you.

Fran <hr /></blockquote>

That's the impression I get too from watching the stories about gymnasts from foreign countries. And they only support the very, very best.

Fran Crimi
04-10-2003, 09:55 AM
High run?!! Are you kidding? Ha! I was just a social player at the time and I didn't even know there was such a thing as a college tournament. The Student Union Director recruited me to play. I figured, what the heck, it should be fun. Lucky for me, Danny Barouty was at the same college at the same time so three weeks before the Championship, I would spend hours every day at the Student Union studying him and learning strategy and safety play, because I knew if I was going to have any chance it would have to be in strategy and not ball runs.

I think my high run may have been around 18 (if it was that high) and I survived by picking off a few balls and playing safe when the shot looked too tough for me. My opponents on the other hand, were going after the big shots, missing them and breaking open the pack. Then I'd just pick off the easy ones and play safe again.

Fran

ceebee
04-10-2003, 09:58 AM
there are several High Schools that have implemented POOL into their curriculum. They have done so in California, Arkansas &amp; other states as well . You can contact jboddy@aol.com for information about some of these programs. You can also contact Steven Ducoff of the BCA. Lots of info is posted in Professor Q-Balls magazine...

Wally_in_Cincy
04-10-2003, 10:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> I also got my start through the ACUI (I think that's what it was called, Assoc. of College Unions, Inc.). In fact that was my first trophy. Won the college championship, represented my college in the Regionals, won that and placed third in the Nationals. We played 14.1 back then.

From what I understand it's still around and operating as strong as ever.

Fran

<hr /></blockquote>

I just looked at their site. They seem to be more interested in hate crimes and diversity than sports now /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
04-10-2003, 10:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> High run?!! Are you kidding? Ha! I was just a social player at the time and I didn't even know there was such a thing as a college tournament. The Student Union Director recruited me to play. I figured, what the heck, it should be fun. Lucky for me, Danny Barouty was at the same college at the same time so three weeks before the Championship, I would spend hours every day at the Student Union studying him and learning strategy and safety play, because I knew if I was going to have any chance it would have to be in strategy and not ball runs.

I think my high run may have been around 18 (if it was that high) and I survived by picking off a few balls and playing safe when the shot looked too tough for me.

<font color="blue">Hey that's how I play LOL </font color>

My opponents on the other hand, were going after the big shots, missing them and breaking open the pack. Then I'd just pick off the easy ones and play safe again.

Fran <hr /></blockquote>

18 is pretty darn good for a social player.

I sorta figured the story would be something like that. That's why I asked, so I could razz you a bit /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Watching great players would give you the huge advantage of knowledge against many college age players, especially in 14.1. Put that together with some double-digit runs and good things can happen.

Thanx for the story.

eg8r
04-10-2003, 10:35 AM
I competed in the ACUI tourneys while I was in college. I never did near as well and never made it to the Nationals. Regionals was the furthest for me.

The ACUI is going strong every year.

eg8r

Scott Lee
04-13-2003, 11:40 PM
I also competed in the ACUI tournaments in college. Won my regionals twice, and went to nationals twice. Finished 5th the first time ('74, when Dan Louie won), and 3rd the second time ('75, when Bob Jewett won). We played 14.1 back then. Fran...what year did you play?

The ACUI is still very active, and I work with collegiate players every year, to help them get to the regional and national level. Three of my students have won the nationals ('82, '84, &amp; '95), and another student got 3rd at the nationals in '96, and 2nd in '97.

On a sidenote, as 9balljunior mentioned, Texas A&amp;M sponsors a yearly intercollegiate competition between universities. Last year, I believe there were competitors from 22 different schools, including some in Canada. The tournament was held at CJ's in Dallas. This is just a fun competition, and there is no higher level play, after their tournament.

Scott Lee

snipershot
04-14-2003, 07:25 AM
Just look at Chin Shun Yang, I would expect more players of this calibre from them in the future as well. If other governments stepped in and did this kids would have support from a young age until they made the pros which would be excellent. I also heard that they tightly restrict the freedom of "their" players /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif We should develop a program similar to theirs without so much player restriction, this indeed is what the pool world needs.

cacee31
04-18-2003, 02:17 AM
From my experiences in Taiwan, the players aren't "tightly" controlled by the government. The reason why there are so many good players there is because the game of pool is just taken more seriously there. There are government sponsored tournaments at every level: elementary school, middle school, highschool, college, and adults. It is also allot easier to get proper coaching there. Many people here start out playing pool with friends and develop bad habits early on that are hard to correct. Over there, almost every pool hall has a coach, some even more than 1. I was there two years ago. I was practicing by myself at a small pool hall when the coach saw my stroke. He immediately came over to me and offered to teach me the "right" way of playing. From what I learned, the Taiwanese stroke is allot more compact and disciplined, thus less prone to stroke errors.
The average level of play is also allot higher in Taiwan. I've seen kids in middle school there run multiple racks of 9 ball like its nothing.

I would recommend everyone who has a chance to stay there for a few weeks and visit a good pool hall there regularly. You'll get to see some amazing stuff by some unknown players to the other countries.