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sneakypapi
04-23-2003, 10:47 PM
I was curious the rule of thought after contacting the cue ball where should a players eyes be focused? Should you be looking at the object ball or still focused on the cue ball? I have noticed in my game that it sometimes depends on the shot and the distance of the shot where my line of vision winds up. At certain times I think I am focusing on a half way point between the two, if that makes sense. Any other input would be appreciated.

04-24-2003, 03:29 AM
While the natural tendancy is to watch the OB go into the pocket (hopefully), one should get into the habit of watching the CB. This way it builds on your library of how the CB reacts and you won't be asking yourself "How did (or do) I get THERE?"

Fred Agnir
04-24-2003, 06:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr> I was curious the rule of thought after contacting the cue ball where should a players eyes be focused? Should you be looking at the object ball or still focused on the cue ball? I have noticed in my game that it sometimes depends on the shot and the distance of the shot where my line of vision winds up. At certain times I think I am focusing on a half way point between the two, if that makes sense. Any other input would be appreciated. <hr /></blockquote>I wonder if there is a single answer to this question. Personally, I look at a couple of things. Where (if) I hit the pocket and where the cueball is going. I think I look at these two for feedback on how I hit the shot. Maybe.

Fred

socrates
04-24-2003, 06:57 AM
Probabally several schools of thought here.

Nick Varner advises to "see the collision". I happen to subscribe to Nick's thoughts on this.

Lock down the shot, don't shoot until you see it, see the collision, freeze on the follow through. Myself, my eyes remain focused on the collision and I try and feel the collision and sense the shot as feedback after the collision. I do however allow my perhiperal vision to sense and feel the route and rotation of the cue ball after contact.

Interesting question. Looking forward to hearing others thoughts on this.

pooltchr
04-24-2003, 07:04 AM
I agree, Steve. When you pull the trigger on the shot your eyes must be focused on the target. I freeze in the finish position with eyes on the aiming point. If my cue is pointing at the aiming point, I know my stroke was correct. And if my aiming point and stroke are correct, I don't need to see the ball go in the pocket. Since the only two ways to miss a shot are incorrect aiming or a faulty stroke, then if both are right, I already know where the object ball is going to be.
Steve

pooltchr
04-24-2003, 07:11 AM
Steve,
BTW, I love your book. Do you mind if I use some of those drills with my students?
Steve

socrates
04-24-2003, 09:54 AM
Thanks for your kind words and certainly demonstrate any of the drills that will help your students learning process.

One of the reasons for the format of the book was my belief in the merits of keeping a journal for each of the excercises as a tool to track your progress and to aid in the learning process. Accordingly, if you would show a copy of the book to your students to see if they might have an interest in obtaining a personal copy I would appreciate it.

Thanks again,

Michelle
04-24-2003, 10:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr> I was curious the rule of thought after contacting the cue ball where should a players eyes be focused? <hr /></blockquote>

I agree with others here that it helps to stay focused on the OB (or other target), and watch the collison/reaction of the balls, for feedback on the shot.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr>Should you be looking at the object ball or still focused on the cue ball? <hr /></blockquote>

Um, "still focused on the CB?"
You shouldn't be focused on the CB at all, when you pull the trigger. All eyeing up the CB should be done during warmup strokes...when you pull the trigger, your eyes should be focused on the target.
If you are not looking at what you are trying to hit, your chances of hitting it correctly diminish quickly...your body follows what your eyes are looking at.

pooltchr
04-24-2003, 10:14 AM
Thanks, Steve. I am a firm believer in giving credit where credit is due. I will make sure they see the book when I use it. I also own a pro shop in a room. If you e-mail me, maybe we can do drum up some sales.
Steve

Rod
04-24-2003, 10:46 AM
Same here Steve, depending on the angle I may not see the o/b go in the pocket. I feel the shot before execution and the c/b path tells me what part of the pocket was hit. In addition it tells me if the stroke used was correct. It becomes obvious if it hit the pocket thin or fat.

Perhiperal vision just after impact is all I see. I think what can get people in trouble is they want to "sneek a peek" and many times before impact. Chances are the stroke wasn't delivered as intended. The o/b and cue ball are going to there destination, or not. Getting in front of the shot to see IMO certanly won't help the outcome. The same applies to avoiding another ball. I see shots go in the pocket, don't get me wrong but I hear some as well.

Rod

Wally_in_Cincy
04-24-2003, 10:48 AM
I think pooltchr should suggest (or require) the purchase of "Black Belt Billiards" to all his students.

I still owe you a book review don't I ? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

http://members.aol.com/blkbeltbilliards/

CrispyFish
04-24-2003, 11:13 AM
This is getting a little off-topic, but that book looks like just the thing for my girlfriend, who's a beginner and tends to get discouraged when she can't chart her progress.

Just ordered a copy. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r
04-24-2003, 11:27 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Um, "still focused on the CB?"
You shouldn't be focused on the CB at all, when you pull the trigger. <hr /></blockquote> I disagree with this statement (it only took a matter of time. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ) In my opinion you should be watching the cue ball right when you hit the cue ball, and then follow the cue balls path till it hits the object ball. This is true in golf and baseball, and other sports. I know baseball is a little different in that the baseball is moving towards you and not standing still, however, you still need to look at it to make sure you swing at it. In golf, same thing. You always keep your eye on the ball through your swing.

Any other opinions?

eg8r

Scott Lee
04-25-2003, 12:58 AM
As anyone who knows me knows, I advocate, teach and practice myself, looking at the CB on contact. Some pros have advocated looking at the CB last for the break...but I do for ALL shots, and feel it is just as effective as looking at the OB. However, the most important variable is a smooth, accurate stroke...without which, where you look last won't matter much, because you will likely miss anyway!
LOL

Scott Lee

pooltchr
04-25-2003, 06:40 AM
eg8r
I think if you use the analogy of archery as opposed to golf or baseball, you might get a better idea why most instructors teach students to focus on the object ball (target) as opposed to the cue ball (arrow). The time to focus on the cue ball is during your warm-up strokes to make sure your contact point is correct. Once you are set, it's time to fix your focus on your objective which is the aiming point for the shot.
Steve

bluewolf
04-25-2003, 06:53 AM
By looking at the ob, I can see if I struck the cb where I thought I was aiming. Also, it helps me to be down if I stay down until the ob pockets. In this freeze position, I can also look at where the cue is pointing for further diagnostics.

This is one of the things randy g teaches in his pool school /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Laura

Scott Lee
04-25-2003, 10:38 AM
Steve...This issue has been debated to death for years. There is NO definitive answer. Both methods work appropriately, according to the needs of the shooter. This is the ultimate case of different strokes for different folks. IMO, if you cannot stroke through the CB where you think you're aiming (likely due to mechanical flaws in the pre-shot routine or delivery of the cue on the final stroke), it doesn't matter where you look last!

Scott Lee

pooltchr
04-25-2003, 11:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Steve...This issue has been debated to death for years. There is NO definitive answer. Both methods work appropriately, according to the needs of the shooter. This is the ultimate case of different strokes for different folks. IMO, <font color="red"> </font color>
Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>Good point, Scott. A faulty stroke will cause more problems than can be corrected by where your eyes are focused when you shoot

Rod
04-25-2003, 11:36 AM
I definately agree Scott. I repeated myself in the dominant eye thread. Dominant eyes, aiming etc is of little value if the delivery is poor, not to mention body and head movement that goes along with a poor or rushed stroke.
PS I sent you a PM.

Rod