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04-28-2003, 07:00 PM
I'am posting this question to the ccb because i would like to know how other keep their shafts clean, i know mines get dirty so i clean my cue with a damp rug with some ajax on the rag, i'll wipe the dirt off the cue and then immediately wipe it down with another dry rag. and that does it for me, i do this once a week.

so how do you clean your cue?

also what tip do most use?

P.S. Does cue glide really work?

stickman
04-28-2003, 07:13 PM
I do somewhat the same. I use a white powdered sink cleanser on a damp rag and scrub the shaft down. I take a clean damp rag and remove any residue. I carefully inspect for dings, and if I find any, I take a small piece of damp tissue paper and place it over the ding to draw it out. I let the shaft completely dry and then buff with an undyed piece of leather. I use the back side of a leather belt. Once I have buffed it to a nice shine, I apply a coat of cream colored carnuba wax to further seal the shaft. It makes my shafts slick and they look new. I sometimes use smoker's toothpaste on my ferrule to remove the chalk dust.

Someone commented that they couldn't draw the dents out of their shaft with the wax on. The powdered cleanser will remove the wax. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Fred Agnir
04-29-2003, 07:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote muujahid:</font><hr> I'am posting this question to the ccb because i would like to know how other keep their shafts clean, <hr /></blockquote>After every use, I wipe my cue down with a damp cloth. I burnish the wood with a piece of leather. For older cues that really need to get that deep dirt out, I use Schuler or Porper cue cleaner, or I use Soft Scrub. It doesn't take everything out, but short of sanding, they're the best I've come across.

Sometimes, I seal with wax. But, you need to be able to spin the cue fast enough to melt the wax, I think. That is, waxing by hand really doesn't work well. In fact, it probably is worse for the cue as the shaft ends up attracting dirt more readily.

Fred

NBC-BOB
05-01-2003, 06:45 AM
I use a cotton pad with alcohol and wipe down the shaft and wrap.After reading your post I thought that ajax cleanser would be a little to abrasive, to use all the time.Measure your shaft thickness with a micrometer and report back to us in a couple of years,if the shaft is thinner after using your method for awhile.

05-01-2003, 06:51 AM
well, i've been cleaning my cue this way for some time, now, but i will go and measure my shafts thickness and it to my new black dot shaft, and see how think the red dot shaft is now from when i first purchased !

socrates
05-01-2003, 06:56 AM
Here's the ceremony.

When I get a new shaft I hit it once with 400 sandpaper to remove the varnish then once with 600 sandpaper. From that point on sandpaper NEVER touches the shaft again.

To keep the shaft clean thereafter I discovered that the products made to clean CD's are perfect for ongoing cleaning and maintenance. The CD cleaner I use is a product made by Fellowes. (SPELLING ?)

They look like a handiwipe but they are not very damp and seem to have just the right amount of alcohol in them for quick drying. They look like a small sheet of bounce. In fact I keep a package in my cue case so I can have it with me at all times.

I used to use a soft cloth with lighter fluid but found the above product works better.

Occasionally, I will burnish the shaft with leather but normally just wipe it down after every use with a terrycloth towel.

Aboo
05-01-2003, 09:54 AM
stickman, and anyone else who might know... Does that tissue paper trick really work? I just bought a used McDermott cue who's shaft has a couple dings in it that I would REALLY like to get rid of. Is there a trick to doing this or is it just a matter of cleaning the shaft and applying the tissue paper while the shaft is still damp?

WaltVA
05-01-2003, 10:11 AM
Clean off any wax or sealer, then place a damp Q-tip or small piece of paper towel or tissue on the ding to raise the grain. Check after a few minutes (you may need to repeat the process for deep dings.) Then sand lightly with 600, 1000, and 1500 grit and buff with leather.

Walt in VA

05-01-2003, 10:32 AM
question to the posters?

where can i get good burnishing leather from ?

05-01-2003, 01:56 PM
Cue Cube makes some good leather burnishers. I got it from my local pool shop, but it's probably on the net.

WaltVA
05-01-2003, 02:04 PM
Try a shoe repair shop - ask for a thin leather replacement half-sole or a piece of undyed scrap, cut it down to fit your case pocket. Should last forever.

Walt in VA

Michelle
05-01-2003, 02:24 PM
As long as you know for sure that your red-dor was originally 13 mm in diameter....Meucci did make cues in 12.75 for quite a while.

Michelle
05-01-2003, 02:38 PM
I try not to use any liquid at all on my cue, except once or twice a year, I will do a deep clean with a Q-Clean type of product.

For daily maintenence, I use a Cue Dr. Magic Cloth, which does go one step beyond just a terry towel because it has a shine/smoothing factor to it. I use a Dent Buffer (which is basically just a glass rod) for taking out small nicks.
And, I hate a dirty ferrule, so I use a whitener on it too.

No sandpaper ever...if my nicks are that bad, I let my repair guy mess with it.

Tip: Moori med. on my Predator SPWU, and I just found out last night that I shoot best with a 17.5 oz. cue!
I was shooting with a 17.5 oz. Predator, then bought the SPWU, which could only go down to 18.5. I haven't been 100% happy with it, so I picked up a friend's not-quite-18-oz. SPW last night, and my game immediately improved.
So, I'm getting mine fixed.

dmgwalsh
05-05-2003, 04:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote WaltVA:</font><hr> Clean off any wax or sealer, then place a damp Q-tip or small piece of paper towel or tissue on the ding to raise the grain. Check after a few minutes (you may need to repeat the process for deep dings.) Then sand lightly with 600, 1000, and 1500 grit and buff with leather.

Walt in VA <hr /></blockquote>

I just bought a viking off ebay and the shaft has a couple of small dings. I tried the tissue paper and qtip thing and they didn't seem to raise the dings. What am I doing wrong and what should I do to smooth it out?

Fred Agnir
05-05-2003, 06:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dmgwalsh:</font><hr> I just bought a viking off ebay and the shaft has a couple of small dings. I tried the tissue paper and qtip thing and they didn't seem to raise the dings. What am I doing wrong and what should I do to smooth it out? <hr /></blockquote>Is it a dent or a nick? Dents can be swelled back. Nicks cannot. Nicks need to be filled.

For dents, I've never had a problem raising them with water. In fact, most cleaning methods I use raise minor dents right off the bat (or the shaft, as it were). If the shaft is old and seasoned, the water may not be penetrating to the wood. Maybe you need to "deglaze."

You could steam a dent out, but it's not for the faint of heart, IMO. I say, if you don't know how, watch an experienced person do it first.

Fred

hadenball
05-29-2003, 01:52 PM
Sometimes you have to keep after it if it is deep,I have used warm water &amp; it seems to work better. Just be patient and keep after it and you can also get a tea pot or pressure cooker and hold it over the steam for 5-10 seconds at a time and keep checking it.If the dent is too deep or the wood fibers are cut you may want to fill it. haden

Pizza Bob
05-29-2003, 02:08 PM
<hr /></blockquote>I just bought a viking off ebay and the shaft has a couple of small dings. I tried the tissue paper and qtip thing and they didn't seem to raise the dings. What am I doing wrong and what should I do to smooth it out? <hr /></blockquote>

Instead of holding the whole shaft in the steam, to lift the dent, take a paper towel and fold it over a couple times. Thoroughly wet a corner. Take that corner and put it on your dent, then take a hot iron (set on cotton or linen) and hold the tip of the iron on the wet paper towel that covers your dent. Just a couple seconds is enough to concentrate the steam only in that area. That will raise the dent and then follow normal procedures to bring it back to glass-like smoothness.

Hope this helps. (Threw that in for Fred)

Adios,

Pizza Bob

miko
05-29-2003, 09:29 PM
how do you repair a ding on the part of the shaft that has a finished coating (the few inches near the joint). Do you sand that part after raising the ding?

pooldaddy9
05-30-2003, 04:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote muujahid:</font><hr> question to the posters?

where can i get good burnishing leather from ? <hr /></blockquote>I get mine from the local shoe shop.

mark wilson
05-30-2003, 05:26 AM
I sand my shafts as needed which is taboo to some but the results are worth the wearing of the shaft. I will use 400 and 600 grit occasionally to polish and smooth. The powder cleaning agents are used when the shafts have accumulated hand oils and chalk residue and once dry a light sanding. I do not concern myself with using a little sanding as a shaft will wear from just playing. As the shaft continually flexes with each shot the fiber of the wood becomes increasingly flexible and at some point a loss of power occurs as the wood fiber has become to whippy and absorbs some energy as opposed to transfer it to the cue ball. Shafts wear out faster from sanding but they will wear out at some point and I love the feel of a freshly sanded shaft. I have never cared for waxes or sealers as they always seemed to become sticky shortly thereafter from a residue build up, sweat, chalk, and oil added to the wax or even the oil from leather burnishing. Give me the natural wood And when needed I replace a shaft.