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View Full Version : Bustamante's break-BD cover story



phil in sofla
04-29-2003, 11:11 AM
Reading the breakdown of Bustamante's breaking techniques, I was amazed to see him call for jacking the cue butt up maybe 10 to 14 inches, and hitting about a tip low on the ball.

It seems this is surely a recipe to jump the cue ball, and have it airborne when it hits the rack. Is this a crucial part of his breaking, or just a choice that could have been made differently? Tried it a little and it did seem to give more pop to the hit, but with the cue ball popping across the rug (found it difficult to control).

Any ideas on this relatively extreme jacking up on the break, recommended by the 'thermonuclear' break artist, Bustie?

pooltchr
04-29-2003, 12:15 PM
I've heard of people doing this and the goal seems to be to get the ball to land at the point where it hits the table and the rack at the same time. I don't have that much control and prefer to keep the ball on the table, but then I don't play as well as Bustamante by any stretch of the imagination.

dave
04-29-2003, 12:48 PM
I thought the article was ridiculous. Though it may work for him; I couldn't help but laugh at the thought of a bunch of beginners trying to imitate him by lunging into the shot and attempting to kick themselves in the back of the head!

bigbro6060
04-29-2003, 12:53 PM
is the article available online anywhere ?

Fred Agnir
04-29-2003, 01:54 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> Any ideas on this relatively extreme jacking up on the break, recommended by the 'thermonuclear' break artist, Bustie? <hr /></blockquote>I'm not saying it's a good idea, but jacking up on the break is hardly a new idea. What I see happening is that the breaker will drop his/her elbow for power (not that s/he relizes it), and the tip comes up as well.

Check out Allison Fisher's break. She has a pronounced jack-up.

Fred

Irish
04-29-2003, 02:11 PM
Pagulayan has a very interesting wrist trick he does on his break on the final backswing that added about 2 MPH to my break once I worked on it.

eg8r
04-29-2003, 04:12 PM
I love guestimations. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

How in the world did you measure this...[ QUOTE ]
Pagulayan has a very interesting wrist trick he does on his break on the final backswing that added about 2 MPH to my break once I worked on it. <hr /></blockquote> I am having fun, but this seems a bit of a stretch. Wouldn't it make more sense to say you notice some increase in speed rather than give some kind of measurement to it?

eg8r

SpiderMan
04-29-2003, 04:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> Reading the breakdown of Bustamante's breaking techniques, I was amazed to see him call for jacking the cue butt up maybe 10 to 14 inches, and hitting about a tip low on the ball.

It seems this is surely a recipe to jump the cue ball, and have it airborne when it hits the rack. Is this a crucial part of his breaking, or just a choice that could have been made differently? Tried it a little and it did seem to give more pop to the hit, but with the cue ball popping across the rug (found it difficult to control).

Any ideas on this relatively extreme jacking up on the break, recommended by the 'thermonuclear' break artist, Bustie? <hr /></blockquote>

I believe the theory here is that by having the cueball "fly" to the rack, you avoid losing energy to cloth friction and conversion to rotation. Maybe there's something gained by bouncing the object balls a little also, I don't know.

I've tried it myself and apparently seen more action for less effort. The trick would be to get it to "land" just right every time to avoid losing control or jumping the cue ball. I think I can do it when breaking over and over on the same equipment, but generally I stay with something more conservative.

I don't play much nine-ball anyway, and for eight-ball I usually break on the second ball. That would be a disaster for a jump break technique.

SpiderMan

"If it's yellow and smells bad, it must be nine-ball. Or a diaper (or a Frenchman)."

cheesemouse
04-29-2003, 05:07 PM
[ QUOTE ]
I've tried it myself and apparently seen more action for less effort. The trick would be to get it to "land" just right every time to avoid losing control or jumping the cue ball. <hr /></blockquote>


Spiderman,
Of course you know that we all go airborn when we hit the break shot hard but do you know where your normal break lands?....here's a simple way to find out and a way to also change your landing area...buy a pad of carbon paper and lay them down on your break path ( carbon side up..LOL ) now start busting some racks. The cueball will leave little skid marks on the paper so you can experiement with different jack up angles and actually see the real result...you get the picture. It is amazing how you can adjust your landing zone. It took me a long time to make the cb land just in front of the head ball but the effort is interesting and worthwhile....of course I try anything for kicks...LOL... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan
04-29-2003, 05:15 PM
Carbon paper still exists?

SpiderMan

cheesemouse
04-29-2003, 05:20 PM
s/man,
LOL.......yes it does and it's cheap too!!!!!!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran Crimi
04-29-2003, 05:40 PM
From what I can tell, it seems that the angle of Bustamante's cue at address is strictly to accommodate his body motion through the shot. As he begins lunging forward, and his torso rears up and his arm comes down, his cue levels off. You can see how level his cue is in photo #9, where it shows his position nanoseconds after impact. Perfectly level, which says it was pretty much that level at impact.

As for his back leg coming up, I think it's a natural balance reaction as a result of his body motion. In picture 6, his weight is slightly back, then somewhere between 6 and 7 he pushes off with his back leg throwing his hips into the shot and in 7 you see the weight transferred to his front leg. By picture 9, just after impact, his back foot is off the ground, and as he continues to lunge forward his leg continues to go up to allow him the leverage he needs to continue to lunge. If he were to let his leg just stay straight and out, I think he would have a hard time standing up with his arm extended that far out.

Fran

eg8r
04-29-2003, 05:45 PM
It sure does. I just checked my email and it has the line Cc: /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r

bigbro6060
04-29-2003, 06:25 PM
i break not unlike Busty (though of course nowhere near as good) and i have videotaped my break. Sure the cue starts off jacked up but when it comes down for the follow through it is level at impact (hopefully !)

Now as well as avoiding friction, having the cueball 'fly' to the pack allows it to land just before the pack, jump up a touch and hopefully 'park' in the middle of the table. That's the other reason

Problems occur when playing on 'non standard' tables etc. You have to practice enough to know how to adjust the landing spot or you will be flying the cueball all around the poolhall on foreign tables, especially smaller pub ones

Rod
04-29-2003, 06:59 PM
Thanks for the explanation Fran. I haven't viewed the article as yet. What people see sometimes is taken for face value. Common sense or physics dictates his arm will lower and his elbow as well. After all if the c/b is struck at the same angle established at the backswing, it's not likely it would even hit the rack. It would flat fly over the balls. LOL

Aiming low on the c/b is another lost leader and I'd bet he doesn't hit it with low. That is unless it's a mistake. People have to read between the lines on this stuff otherwise the would be Busty impersonators will have balls flying everywhere! From the few times I've watched I have noticed the c/b reaction with some similar to this, here is the c/b path after the break, line A


That doesn't happen with low. I'll not try to compare my break with his but I've seen him do similar, Line B is what can happen when I break, once again not low. There had to of been a little follow. I break elevated then drop the cue in the slot, even at that the cue still has to have a slight elevation in the rear. You can't break from there with a level cue. I think Line C is what most are after except for specialty breaks.

Rod

caedos
04-29-2003, 07:38 PM
It also seems evident from the photographs that Bustamante starts with his grip hand in front of perpendicular. By bringing the rest of his body forward in a lunge, the distance of the lunging motion puts his grip hand very near perpendicular to the cue at the moment of contact. I guess when you play that much and you figure out how to time all of that, you can do what you like. Just like any pattern that wins a game can appear to be the 'correct' pattern (like there's only one...), when you have one of the greatest nine-ball breaks in the world many people will try to mimic you even though they may have a completely different physical makeup (height, hands, speed, flexibility, etc.).

Just opining,

Carl

04-29-2003, 09:37 PM
If you had trained yourself to land the cue ball right at the head ball you would have to adjust when playing on a bigger or smaller table which seems very risky and difficult.

cheesemouse
04-30-2003, 06:38 AM
9-ball Jr,
Being able to quickly adjust to changing conditions is a hallmark of the higher levels of play, finite as those adjustments might be if your striving for your best game you adjust. Of course it's difficult, if it wasn't we'd all be champions....LOL

Fred Agnir
04-30-2003, 06:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> From what I can tell, it seems that the angle of Bustamante's cue at address is strictly to accommodate his body motion through the shot. As he begins lunging forward, and his torso rears up and his arm comes down, his cue levels off. You can see how level his cue is in photo #9, where it shows his position nanoseconds after impact. Perfectly level, which says it was pretty much that level at impact.

As for his back leg coming up, I think it's a natural balance reaction as a result of his body motion. In picture 6, his weight is slightly back, then somewhere between 6 and 7 he pushes off with his back leg throwing his hips into the shot and in 7 you see the weight transferred to his front leg. By picture 9, just after impact, his back foot is off the ground, and as he continues to lunge forward his leg continues to go up to allow him the leverage he needs to continue to lunge. If he were to let his leg just stay straight and out, I think he would have a hard time standing up with his arm extended that far out.

Fran <hr /></blockquote>Perfect post. IMNSHO.

Fred Agnir
04-30-2003, 06:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote caedos:</font><hr> It also seems evident from the photographs that Bustamante starts with his grip hand in front of perpendicular. <hr /></blockquote>And yet another thing very obvious (that everyone probably already mentioned, but I was too lazy to read) is that he aims with low left hand english. That might be a stick-aiming alignment, as I see other Filipino players doing that also.

Every time I see Busty play, for center or follow, he aims low left. For draw, he aims with his tip hittting the cloth about 4-5" in front of the cueball. I don't think he really hits where he aims. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Fred

Eric.
04-30-2003, 09:41 AM
I think the BD article was good but leaves alot to be desired on breaking. One thing I noticed is that they didn't discuss the most important part of the technique-the generating power in the stroke.

IMHO (and I am not the final authority), the power break is very similar to a Martial Arts straight punch or a Martial Arts break strike (I have a little M. Arts experience).

For those interested, the technique is a combination of power AND speed, with timing. Having one without the other is weak. Using the straight punch as an example, you start from a balanced &amp; stable position. You then progressively bring your entire body intothe focal point, finishing with the end result-the tip of your knuckles at full extension.

To make a long story short(and to spare your bleeding eyes) with breaking, you need to snap your arm forward with a not-tense arm while simutaneosly driving your back leg and hip into the the focal point(CB) and at the last second before CB contact, contract all the muscles involved, then releaseafter impact. Speed, Power and Timing is what enables the human bone (which breaks with only 10-15lbs of pressure) to drive thru several stone tiles.


Eric

bigbro6060
04-30-2003, 10:00 AM
guys, there's no way i can get hold of the magazine in Australia

i don't suppose someone could scan the article ?

cheers

DSAPOLIS
04-30-2003, 10:04 AM
Fran hit the nail on the head here. This break is what works for Francisco and his body. Something to remember here is that Francisco might weight 130 pounds with rocks in his pockets. So, if you are 6 foot 4, 230 pounds, trying Bustamante's break might not be as effective. Several years ago when I was working with Jennifer Chen, we worked strictly on balancing her body "through" the break. Watch Jennifer's break in comparison to the break of Karen Corr and Allison Fisher. If there is one weak spot in Allison's game, it would be the uneven distribution of energy during her break. If she would correct this, she would be more successful, if there is such a thing as being more successful than she is right now. Ewa Mataya has a distinctive "head dip" on her break shot. This is because instead of following through, she tends to tense up her entire body after her tip makes contact with the cue ball. All of this has to do with the weight distribution of their body on the break shot. I believe that Francisco is such a phenomenal breaker because he has near perfect balance, and excellent fluidity throughout the stroke. I believe that if Francisco wanted to, he could possibly add another inch or two to his follow through, and that is because his break stroke is so smooth and most importantly, natural. Another player that has this trait is Johnny Archer, who I believe has a more powerful break than Bustamente. What needs to be pointed out is that neither of these guys are super heavyweights, but they have phenomenal power. This is evident by the "speed" of their stroke, which due to the factors of balance, and body mechanics, generates awesome cue speed, and therefore a phenomenal result. Itis important to also point out, that accuracy is also the key. Bustamante can have all of the perfect body mechanics, but if he is not hitting the one ball where he needs to, he'll get mere mortal results. Study each rack and learn to recognize where you need to hit the one ball for maximum results.

Irish
05-01-2003, 02:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> I love guestimations. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

How in the world did you measure this...&lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
Pagulayan has a very interesting wrist trick he does on his break on the final backswing that added about 2 MPH to my break once I worked on it. <hr /></blockquote> I am having fun, but this seems a bit of a stretch. Wouldn't it make more sense to say you notice some increase in speed rather than give some kind of measurement to it?

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>


I have had my break speed clocked numerous times. There are ways to measure your break speed quite accurately. Learn before you speak.

cheesemouse
05-01-2003, 06:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Irish:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> I love guestimations. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

How in the world did you measure this...&lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
Pagulayan has a very interesting wrist trick he does on his break on the final backswing that added about 2 MPH to my break once I worked on it. <hr /></blockquote> I am having fun, but this seems a bit of a stretch. Wouldn't it make more sense to say you notice some increase in speed rather than give some kind of measurement to it?

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>


I have had my break speed clocked numerous times. There are ways to measure your break speed quite accurately. Learn before you speak. <hr /></blockquote>

Irish,
You disagreed with ed8r...... /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif You must be a LEFTY...... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Be prepared for a response that denies the existance of the radar gun along with a bunch of BLAH BLAH.......LOL LOL!!!!!

The cheese is having fun also...... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fred Agnir
05-01-2003, 07:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Irish:</font><hr> I have had my break speed clocked numerous times. There are ways to measure your break speed quite accurately. Learn before you speak. <hr /></blockquote>Did you calibrate the measurement device? Did you use different measuring devices?

Fred &lt;~~~ designer of custom test equipment

TomBrooklyn
05-01-2003, 11:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bigbro6060:</font><hr> is the article available online anywhere ? <hr /></blockquote>Can't you get BD where you are? I think the sponsers of this board are hoping the board users will buy their magazine. =Tom