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eg8r
05-05-2003, 02:28 PM
Anyone here on the CCB have sleep apnea? I am going to another sleep study and they are going to test a CPAP machine to see what pressure will work for me. I am a little unnerved about sleeping with one of these things for the rest of my life.

If you have/had sleep apnea, did you opt out for surgery instead?

eg8r

cheesemouse
05-05-2003, 03:52 PM
eg8r,
I had a pool teammate that had sleep apnea. He was in his sixtys and had tried every devise and proceedure known to man. He would literally fall asleep in the middle of a pool game on occassion. About five years ago he got very ill with the flue and lost about 10>15% of his body weight whereupon he got relief from his apnea for about six months then he gained the weight back and back came his apnea....that's all I know about the situation.....good luck. I know it is a brutal condition to live with....

WesK
05-05-2003, 04:03 PM
I have had it all my life.

I was diagnosed about 8 years ago. I did a sleep study that was split--they found that I had OSA in the first half and titrated me on a CPAP for the second half.

At first I thought that there was no way that I could tolerate it. But, after finding out what sleep is really all about, I got quite used to it.

I spent the money on an auto-CPAP machine. That is very similar to what they use for your test. It self-adjusts to the lowest pressure all the time.

PM me if you want more info, etc.

I have heard that the surgery fixes it for a little while but it can come back.

wes

dg-in-centralpa
05-05-2003, 04:08 PM
eg8r - my wife just got a cpap machine within the past month. It will take some getting used to. My mother got one about 3 months ago. They feel it's either use the machine or risk death, as they both stopped breathing while sleeping during the test. As my mother put it, "Wearing one of these machines is the next best thing to birth control." My wife looks like an air force pilot with an oxygen mask on. But seriously... give it a chance. It's better than death.

eg8r
05-05-2003, 05:26 PM
When I went for the first study a couple years ago, it was at my house and the guy just dropped the equipment off and showed me how to put it all on. The results came back yes/no they were not convincing enough for me. When I moved out here, I have decided I am tired of never getting any sleep. During this past study, I quit breathing 4 times (I remember only 3, so one of them must have been pretty light). I have looked online at some of the contraptions and I am not real excited about any of the options.

eg8r

eg8r
05-05-2003, 05:29 PM
[ QUOTE ]
At first I thought that there was no way that I could tolerate it. But, after finding out what sleep is really all about, I got quite used to it. <hr /></blockquote> LOL, I have heard this from everyone at work. It just sucks right now. I get to work at around 5:30 AM and I am fine until around 8 AM and then I am very tired. I yawn all day and am flat worn out when I get home. I am quite excited about sleeping through the entire night and seeing what a full nights sleep. I am sure it will not be tonight. The tech told me he would be in and out all night fooling with the pressure, and I will be trying to sleep with all that air being forced down.

eg8r

eg8r
05-05-2003, 05:34 PM
I have heard the weight issue before. My first doctor said that would cure everything. Well I lost some weight and never noticed any difference. So, I just gained it all back. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

As luck would have it, I went to see my dentist here in Fort Worth and he has been doing a study on patients with sleep apnea. When I was filling out the paperwork for the visit I put that I had sleeping problems. When he was checking me out he asked me right away if I had apnea. LOL, I said yes as a matter of fact I was just diagnosed with it. He said I was built perfectly for it, I have a long pallette, large tonsil pads and a large tongue. When I lay back all those variables together close off the airways. He said that most doctors never even look at that stuff (I agreed and said none have looked so far). So, I am going to chat with them some about it tonight and see what they say.

Thanks everyone for the information.

eg8r

WesK
05-05-2003, 09:35 PM
I used to fall asleep while driving.

WesK
05-05-2003, 09:44 PM
Good Luck.

Let me know how it turns out.

I had a tonsilectomy at age 34. It was pretty neat since I was 30 years older than the next oldest patient. My ENT took out my uvula with the tonsils and shortened my palate a little bit.

This worked great for about 3 months. I remember the night after surgery being amazing--it was the first time that I dreamed in years. I felt great the next day. Once the surgery "wore" off, I was much better but still not good.

Even after the surgery I would have OSA about 7 times an hour and central apnea (loss of the reflex to breathe) about once an hour--according to my sleep study.

w

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 06:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cheesemouse:</font><hr> eg8r,
I had a pool teammate that had sleep apnea. He was in his sixtys and had tried every devise and proceedure known to man. He would literally fall asleep in the middle of a pool game on occassion. About five years ago he got very ill with the flue and lost about 10&gt;15% of his body weight whereupon he got relief from his apnea for about six months then he gained the weight back and back came his apnea....that's all I know about the situation.....good luck. I know it is a brutal condition to live with.... <hr /></blockquote>

If you means he just nods off at any time, that is a different condition called narcolepsy. That one can be treated somewhat but i do not think they can ever fix it 100%.

Apnea is the person actually stops breathing for a period of time during sleep, usually a few seconds. I think it is also associated with snoring and maybe obesity.

I have said this before.I think medical science is in the dark ages. There are more things doctors cannot do about certain situations that they can do. Except for something simple, like put a cast on a broken leg, most of the time, they cannot complete fix anything. They just slap a bunch of labels on you, give you pills and the pills from one condition make the other condition worse or create yet another one.

I know that some people have to take meds for certain things like diabetes or a seizure disorder, but for the most part I think 'better living through chemistry' is greatly overrated.

My chiropracotor is way smarter and knows more than 95% of doctors I have gone to.

Laura

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 06:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> . <hr /></blockquote> LOL, I have heard this from everyone at work. It just sucks right now. I get to work at around 5:30 AM and I am fine until around 8 AM and then I am very tired. I yawn all day and am flat worn out when I get home. I am quite excited about sleeping through the entire night and seeing what a full nights sleep. I am sure it will not be tonight. The tech told me he would be in and out all night fooling with the pressure, and I will be trying to sleep with all that air being forced down.

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>

What a bummer. Like everything, there are degrees. If you are that tired, you are not getting good sleep. Going through the various stages of sleep appears to be interupted by bouts of apnea. I think whitewolf has apnea too. I can tell by his snoring and then there is a big snore like he is gasping. I am glad you brought this up so I will ride on him to see a specialist.

Good luck to you. The machine is better than dying, that is sure. it bothers me that you are tired all the time excpet for a few hours. That really sucks.

Laura

eg8r
05-06-2003, 06:58 AM
Last night I did the sleep study again, but this time using the CPAP machine. He started me out at level 4 on the machine, and moved it all the way to 10 (during my deepest sleep). Last night is the first time in years that I had "real" dreams. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif When I did the first sleep study, I had central apnea in the beginning and that changed to OSA near the middle of the night.

This time, no snoring, dreams, only woke up 3 times...It was like heaven. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif My wife is very excited about the elimination of snoring. LOL. The only problem I had with the mask was that it looked like I was scuba diving with that big hose coming off my face. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

eg8r

Sid_Vicious
05-06-2003, 07:08 AM
"I can tell by his snoring and then there is a big snore like he is gasping. I am glad you brought this up so I will ride on him to see a specialist."

I have heard other sleepers snore and sleep like that over the years, heck I may be exactly like that myself, but these people continued on with their lives never having a personal reason to worry about it. Except for being sleepy all day long, what else is involved with this affliction? If you tell me it is possibly that you might stop breathing and die, then what's the ratio of people with this who have? I'm not making light of this subject, still we as a human being are sometimes quick to get a "soap opera" disease after seeing or reading about it. Maybe WW would sleep better without anybody's help BW. Just a thought...sid

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 08:26 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> . Maybe WW would sleep better without anybody's help BW. Just a thought...sid <hr /></blockquote>

The snoring interferes with my sleep also. We had already decided he was going to a specialist, just not sure what kind or if the apnea kind is different.

Dont think anyone here is getting sleep when I am poking him because it woke me up and if that doesnt work, shaking him hard until he wakes up and stops snoring loud.

I cannot think of anyone that likes sleeping with a snoring person. In my case, I am hight strung anyway and have to have quiet to get to sleep. If he gets to sleep, then I have to taking a sleeping pill to go to sleep and that is not good either.

Laura

Gayle in MD
05-06-2003, 08:35 AM
Hi Sid, we seem to often think alike, lol. Other than my annual physicals, I am a firm believer in avoiding doctors and medicine and hospitals whenever possible.

I have never known of anyone so far in my life that died becuause they stopped breathing in their sleep, have you?

I just wonder what life style habits may contribute to this problem. Wonder, also, if everyone exercised, how many health problems would vanish. My Mom has taken twenty to thirty pills a day for years, all for problems that could all have been cured with nothing more than eating right, and exercising.

Just a thought,
Gayle in Md.

eg8r
05-06-2003, 08:57 AM
I also am a firm believer in avoiding doctors and medicine. I guess it is hard to understand since you are not "tired" all day, every day. When I went for the first study I was in the bed for 6.5 hours. During that time, I only really slept for 45 minutes. The tech said the rest of the time was spent dozing then waking up (in my case it is because I stopped breathing, or breathing was hard to do).

One of my options is to have the surgery. After talking with the tech last night, he was saying that a high percentage of the patients had to have surgery again in 6 months. Instead I am opting to try the CPAP. No medicine, no more doctors, just put it on right before I go to sleep.

As far as, % of people that have died because of breathing, I have no idea, do some research on your own and let us know.

As far as lifestyle habits, I do not do anywhere near the exercise that I should however this has nothing to do with my condition. All the excerise you can do will do nothing for my oversized tongue, extra long pallette (sp?) and large tonsil pads. When I lay down all those variables help obstruct the airways. In other cases, weight loss has helped remove the apnea for the time being, but it also has the chance of resurfacing. I am no expert, I just understand my example and exercise will not help the apnea (it will help everything else /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif )

eg8r

eg8r
05-06-2003, 09:11 AM
[ QUOTE ]
. Except for being sleepy all day long, what else is involved with this affliction? <hr /></blockquote> Boy isn't this the understatement of the year.

I do stop breathing in my sleep. I was diagnosed with mixed apnea (central apena and OSA). Central apnea is when the nervous system does not tell the body to breath (I hope I explained that correctly). OSA is when for some reason the airways are blocked partially or completely. Am I in risk of dying from not breathing, doubt it, but I have woken up before gasping for breath similar to someone who has been held underwater.

The main reason I decided to find out what was going on, is being tired all day. I am not sure I can explain how tired I usually am. One good example of how I am feeling most of the time is similar to you getting up at 6 AM one day, going to work, playing in a softball game that night, going out to eat afterwards, then staying up all night and heading to work again the next day. I am just flat worn out everyday right after I wake up.

Until now, I thought I was getting maybe 3 to 4 hours sleep, that is not the case by any means. According to the tests that I recently went through and the previous ones that I did a few years ago, I am only "sleeping" for around 1 to 1.5 hours a night.

I have done the exercise routine in the past, tried the vitamins and other health store suggestions and none of them helped. Now, I would like to see what this machine does. If it helps great, I cannot wait to see what it is like to go through the day and not doze off sitting at a red light or doze off while at work. If it does not work, then I will see what the next alternative is. The point is that I am a bit over being tired all the time.

eg8r

Gayle in MD
05-06-2003, 09:27 AM
Hi there, and I sure wish you luck in solving your problem. Let us know how you make out.

I suspect that I may have the same problem, but my sleeping problems only seem to surface when I am in a slump, and stop exercising. As soon as I get back to my regular exercise program, I sleep like a baby. But, really, just wondering, have you ever known of anyone who actually died of this?

I am not familiar with the various sleep aids of which you speak, only the surgery, but just want to say that it is truly amazing the advantages received when one makes exercise a regular part of their day. The benefits are too numerous to try to list. It would be interesting to learn more about sleep apnea, though. I'll have to try to remember to look up some information on the subject.


Gayle in Md...... Good luck !

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 09:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> I also am a firm believer in avoiding doctors and medicine. I guess it is hard to understand since you are not "tired" all day, every day.<hr /></blockquote>

Righton. I do not have sleep apnea but being tired all the time is one of the worst things. It is like when I felt that way, I felt like I did not have a life. My life was torture, I mean, I want to feel good and able to do the things I need to do, not feel crappy all of the time.

I think I have been in a similar place as you, but for different reasons, and it sucked big time.

Laura

WesK
05-06-2003, 10:37 AM
Yeah. Sleep is a pretty neat thing.

Good luck.

wes

eg8r
05-06-2003, 11:05 AM
No I don't know anyone that has ever died from the problem, but I guess someone may have in the past. It is a bit scary to think about it. This however was not the original intent for me going to get it checked out.

The CPAP machine and mask are used to keep the airways open so that the breathing is not restricted. I will put a mask (just a small piece that covers the whole nose) on when I am ready to go to sleep and then turn the machine on. It pumps air through the nose into the body. At first I was a little aprehensive to try it due to the fact that you are trying to exhale while this thing is pumping air down your nose/throat. It turned out to not be a big deal and all my anxiety was for naught.

I will let you guys know how it works out in a couple weeks. I want to sleep with it for awhile and see if there are any changes.

Thanks,

eg8r

Sid_Vicious
05-06-2003, 01:40 PM
Any nights that I toss and turn until the wee hours of the morning are murder the next day. I'd certainly understand a lot more if I went for even a week that way, much less a lot longer. I'm sure you've probably tried most all of the sleep aids, but my brother once began using one of those ocean wave simulating machines to produce a good night's sleep. I personally have to have some kind of white noise to rest...sid

eg8r
05-06-2003, 02:06 PM
Yup, no sleep sucks.

[ QUOTE ]
I'm sure you've probably tried most all of the sleep aids, but my brother once began using one of those ocean wave simulating machines to produce a good night's sleep. I personally have to have some kind of white noise to rest <hr /></blockquote> I have tried quite a few things, and nothing really helps. My wife started noticing that she would wake up to hear me gasping for breath. After this is when I went to see my doctor. He at first (this is a couple years ago) had me try a few things (laying position, different pillows designed to align my back, nose thingys, etc). None worked so I ignored it until one very serious instance in which when I woke up I gasping for breath like I had not had a breath in a few minutes. It was scary, so I decided to check out the sleeping study. The first results seemed inconclusive so I ignored it again till now.

I guess I will be back to restless sleep for another week until they get done with the results and send over the home med people.

eg8r

bluewolf
05-07-2003, 12:17 PM
Ed,

The average person breathes 12-20 times a minute while awake. The average pulse for most folks in 70-80 or so. Mine is around 60. My blood pressure is on the low side also.

One thing I have noticed on awakening is that my pulse and blood pressure and respiration rate is less in that relaxed state. Guess that is why they call it 'rest'.

This is a round about way of saying like suppose you breathe 8 times a minute while asleep, then any missed breath will be major and the more you miss, well it would be more major and feel worse. I really do feel for you. Hope you get some solutions.

Laura

Paul_Mon
05-08-2003, 04:45 AM
I was diagnosed with moderate sleep Apnea and used the CPAP machine for about 6 months before giving it up. While I did have many good nights sleep with the machine I also struggled with the hoses tangling and being too cold in winter and too warm in summer. Just this week I picked up a NAPA (Nocturnal Airway Patency Appliance) device. I've only had it two days and can notice a difference!! What it does is position your lower jaw in a forward position and effectively open up your airway. PM me if you want additional info.

Paul Mon~~~~likes to sleep and dream

eg8r
05-08-2003, 07:54 AM
I had asked the tech about the air making reference that I enjoyed the coolness, however I can see this being a problem in the winter. He said that he is able to change the temperature and warm it up if need be. I wonder if this is possible on just the lab machine or if it is adjustable for a home unit.

eg8r

Paul_Mon
05-08-2003, 07:59 AM
There are CPAP units that have temperature controls. A buddy of mine just got one that has two small nozzles that go into the nostrils, much less cumbersome than the mask.

Good luck with whatever you end up with.......Paul

WesK
05-08-2003, 09:29 AM
The same things that Paul refers to are sold as "nasal pillows".

You can get a heater and a humidifier for your CPAP but it requires a prescription.

wes