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bluewolf
05-06-2003, 07:11 AM
I think that I might not be practicing enough. I guess I average about an hour a day. Sometimes it is a little more like 2 hours, but I only do this a couple of times a week.

Since there are a lot of good players on this forum, I was wondering how much you practiced.

Laura

Kato
05-06-2003, 07:26 AM
I haven't practiced for about 1 year. My game has suffered greatly during that time. But, when my eyes went I started pressing and started missing shots and spots and got frustrated. I won't practice again until my eyes get right.

Kato

DSAPOLIS
05-06-2003, 07:32 AM
It's not how much or how long you practice, it's what you practice. Practicing some of the stroke techniques and stroke speed for 30 minutes a day will do wonders over a period of time. I watched Scott Lee giving a class for almost 8 hours last week, so I know that he gave you a lot of useful things to practice, that is where you should start.

Personally, my practices are extremely organized. I show up for practice with a list of things to work on, and I stick to it. Between giving classes, advice, seeing old friends, and all of the regular BS'ing that goes on every day, I usually trim my practices down to about 2-3 hours, 4 times a week. Due to my recent re-evaluation of my personal goals, I will probably step that up a bit. Longer practices can cause you to burn out after a while. You need to develop your skills, not grind them down. Many of the articles I have written in regards to practice (The Purpose of Practice - Preparing for Competition - You Only Get to Heaven if You Eat Your Vegetables)all give proper practice techniques and ideas on how to structure your practices.

9 Ball Girl
05-06-2003, 07:35 AM
There was a time when I was practicing/playing 7 days a week for about 4-5 hours a day if not longer. I did that for about 2 years. Now that I'm pushing 30, my body's telling me to let up a little. So, I now only practice/play 2-3 times a week. On Thursdays I'll play with some of the guys that play in the tourney I help run to warm them up. On Fridays and Saturdays I'll play from about 11PM-4AM and on Sundays (my early days) I'll play from about 2-6PM.

I'm sensing that I'll be back at it again when the weather gets warmer and I need to be in an airconditioned place!

05-06-2003, 07:36 AM
well, i spend alot of time practicing usually 2hrs and about 3-4 days a week, the thing is that you have to stay focused because people see that your practicing and will still ask you to play games with them, tell them no if your game is important to you. but for the most part i run alot of drills, and position shots.

bigbro6060
05-06-2003, 07:40 AM
2 hours on a workday, 4-6 hours on a non work day

i totally agree with david, you need to structure your workout and working on your stroke does do wonders

i usually start of with stroke work, then move onto potting practice, then positional practice and finally games

others days i just break again and again

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 07:56 AM
I work on my stroke every single day and on speed control every day too. I also work on all of the differnt shots,and banks sort of spontaneously.

Scott did explain banks to me. With my lack of expereince with pool, I am working on the short easy ones mostly, although I do love the long banks and the easy 'reverse' banks. I love banks and kicks so much that, just like safety, I have to force myself to keep that practice to a minimum, so that I can work on my more important stuff.

I work additionally extra on long cuts and long straight ins.I usually get in the long straight ins because that is stroke.

The speed control is the lag and easier hits on the cb, that I practice.I do lag(every day), 2x a week one rail, 3 rails, 4 rails, 1/2 rail,1/4 a rail and 2 inches.

When the ob is added, I am practicing differnt speeds for position. The lag drill is a separate drill is as the long shot drill.

Scott worked with me for 8 hours. We covered the basic stuff first, then using the mechanical bridge, some on banks position and other things. Since I have the tape I can review and practice.

I draw really well now, thanks to scott.

My husband and I play nine ball also for position and long shots. I do okay with him as long as I get the apa spot. ie-I have to get 19 balls in before he gets 51 LOL

But I was mostly asking for how long different people practice.

Laura

pooltchr
05-06-2003, 07:59 AM
I try to spend 20 to 30 percent of my table time on practice and the rest playing. After I went to school, I reversed that for a couple of weeks because I wanted to work on the new things I had learned. Quality vs Quantity. Practice is more than throwing balls out on the table and hitting them in. Get the drills for the areas you need to develop and do the drills. Then when you have finished, reward yourself by playing (NOT PRACTICING). What you will find is the things you practice will find their way into your game without your thinking about it. You don't need to be thinking about your stroke/stance/etc when you are playing. Practice those things and they will become automatic.

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 08:01 AM
Kato,

I accidentally got something in the corner of my right eye last night and i was blinded in that eye.

As I was fllushing it with water, I was kind of feeling humorous at the same time, thinking gosh, now I will have to shoot leftie all of the time.

I do not want to get into dominance again because my situation is weird anyway, and the doctors cannot figure it out.

Laura

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 08:16 AM
One thing about practice. I do not use low percentage stuff in a game. For instance, until I am 80% on most long cuts, I avoid them in matches, unless it is my only shot.

So my practice sounds better than my performance in matches, and that is why. I would rather work on my weaknesses in practice until they become a strenght, before using them in a match.

Laura

Kato
05-06-2003, 08:22 AM
You are 80% on your long cut but won't use it in a game? At what point will you use that shot in a game? 100% is unattainable (though a very admirable goal). If I'm an 80% shooter on a shot then I'm shooting it confidently. Play that shot Laura, trust your stroke, you'll love the confidence it brings you when you drill it and your opponents jaw drops. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Kato

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 08:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Kato:</font><hr> You are 80% on your long cut but won't use it in a game? At what point will you use that shot in a game? 100% is unattainable (though a very admirable goal). If I'm an 80% shooter on a shot then I'm shooting it confidently. Play that shot Laura, trust your stroke, you'll love the confidence it brings you when you drill it and your opponents jaw drops. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Kato <hr /></blockquote>

Right now in practice I am about 50% on long easy cuts and sad to say only about 25% cuts on the hard long cuts.

When I am playing a good shooter, it is much wiser imo to play safe than to take a low percentage shot. I guess i am kind of analytical in a way and now my % on all of the shots. Sometimes I will take a long difficult shot if it leaves them long and hard. I do try absolutely to make that long cut and often succeed, but I also know that if I miss it, they do not have a run out.

The reason I practice the hard stuff is so that I can play like an sl4 when I get bumped to a three. I played crappy at first, I am about 60-70% w/l in my last 10 matches.There is no two in our league that can beat me and hardly any threes, especially with my spot. Even with my spot, right now I am only capable of beating 1/4 to 1/2 of the 4s

Laura

05-06-2003, 08:45 AM
well, laura sounds like your developing a defensive game.
my best and honest suggestion to you is to get rid of the fear and shoot with confidence. also i also believe that you should play those shots in your games when they come up. as for you missing long shots straight in's i'd say that's your stroke, the cb does what you do.....

when ever i get on a table i run a stroke drill a couple of times, i hit the cb dead center down the table and leave the tip pointed out, if the cb comes right back to the tip then i did good, if it diverges in any direction i have a problem and need to fix it quick.

HTH.

Kato
05-06-2003, 08:50 AM
I'm sorry Laura, I did not see the word "until" in your original post. I will read more carefully next time. My apologies.

Kato

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 09:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote muujahid:</font><hr>as for you missing long shots straight in's i'd say that's your stroke, the cb does what you do.....

when ever i get on a table i run a stroke drill a couple of times, i hit the cb dead center down the table and leave the tip pointed out, if the cb comes right back to the tip then i did good, if it diverges in any direction i have a problem and need to fix it quick.

HTH. <hr /></blockquote>

Long straight ins. 80+%. Scott has taught me well.The cuts are weird. In practice I can keep missing like 2-3 times, then figure out what I was doing wrong, then start socking them in, one after another. Now the hard cuts, that is a different story. I have hit a 70% long cut in a match before but that is definately the exception rather than the rule.

In a match, I take my 80% shots. As far as the others I am not as good at, I play safe or take them depending on what the other player can do. I am sure not a runout player and I do not want to give the other player a runout either.

Laura

Tom_In_Cincy
05-06-2003, 09:08 AM
Laura,

As an SL2, don't you average 5-6 innings per game? This would mean that you are playing a lot of safes or missing alot.

Your practice routine should focus more on the fundamentals than extremes.

I always practice/warmup with stroke drills. And, of course that last shot I missed that keeps buzzing around in my head..

I like to spend about 30 minutes practicing every time I go into a pool hall. Sometimes that is 4 or 5 nights a week. I don't have a life outside of a pool hall.. at least that's what my wife says.

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 09:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> Laura,

As an SL2, don't you average 5-6 innings per game? This would mean that you are playing a lot of safes or missing alot.

Your practice routine should focus more on the fundamentals than extremes.

<hr /></blockquote>

Not that good at shape yet. My innings go up considerably if the break is bad and left a bunch of clusters to break up. It is hard to keep the innings down when one is not skilled enough to be good at breaking up clusters and the other player is even worse. I try to get them to pot three balls and then i can play better position without so much 'crap' on the table.

So lots of my safety play is just trying to manipulate them into getting their crap off the table so that I can then shoot my balls in.I have to admit too, that if I do not have a good shot, I make a legal hit on a ball that is say at the other end of the table from where I want it for the end part of the game.

Someoone told me that innings dont count for going to a three. So when I am playing a two, I just sort of play arouond with them and trying out different types of strategy . Then when they get some balls off, I can hit mine in.

So my innings are high I guess because when I play a two, i use it as an opportunity to try out different stuff.

Apa bumps up a sl2 when their win loss exceeds 50%. In the meantime, i am practicing and learning as much as I can because there is still one or two threes that I cannot beat. At my current win%, I think this gives me about a month to be able to beat them when I become a 3.And no am not sandbagging. I try to win. Plus apa has something factored in so padding innings really does not work (sl3 and above) in you win% is high.

If a am playing a good shooter, than there are less innings.
I am 80% on short shots, long straight in and worse on long cuts. The thing that holds me back, imo, is the lack of ability to maneuver around 15 balls. If there is an open table, especially mostly short and side pocket shots, i can shoot in more balls in a row than if they are all bunched together.

That is why scott was trying to help me to learn how to break up clusters with ball speed and cheating pocket etc. And ray and I play nineball too to help me with position and long cuts.

What I do even when just potting a bunch of balls is take each sshot slow to make sure I am doing the right fundamentals scott taught me and try to plan how to get on the next ball. i usually screw this up though, the cb goes a little too far or sometimes a harder cut than I wanted etc.

So believe me, I do work on fundamentals.

Laura

Aboo
05-06-2003, 11:04 AM
You sound a LOT like me when I first started playing APA 8-ball /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif I have one suggestion for you. Don't worry about your opponent so much! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif I am trying to force myself to play the balls and not the opponent. If I don't see a high percentage run-out, then I shoot a safety so my opponent can't run out. Wether my opponent is a sl7 or an sl2.
The only difference in my game vs. different skill level's... I do take riskier shots playing an sl2 than I would an sl7, but that's across the board.
Against an sl7 I won't shoot a shot if I feel it's less than 80-90% makeable. Ever. Against an sl2 that percentage drops significantly, depending on the sl2 and what stage of the game I'm in. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I REALLY try to practice at LEAST an hour a day during the week, 2-4hrs on the weekends. I'm working through the Blackbelt book of Steve's right now /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif Just started it actually. I don't always get that much time in on the table and feel bad when I don't /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif But family and work HAVE to come first, or else I REALLY feel bad /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Predator314
05-06-2003, 11:48 AM
I usually practice about 1-2 hours, 3-4 times a week. This is actual practice time where I do drills, set up shots that have been giving me troubles, practice banking, kicking, jumping, breaking, etc. I have using some of the drills Blackjack has been giving in his yahoo group lately.

Last night, I practiced for about 2.5 hours. I started out just hitting some balls around. Then I set up about 10 9-ball racks and broke and played them out (I was mainly focusing on getting a good break since it has been lacking lately). I then practiced banks for a little while. Lastly I set up a long rail shot that has been aggravating me lately. I worked on both making the ball with all englishes. I also worked on playing safe when I am faced with that shot.

This is the shot I'm talking about:

START(
%AJ7R1%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%JK6M5
%KJ5P7%LJ5N2%MO0D0%NK5Q5%OJ5M0%PH5F0%Ur1D2%VO8C9%W M3D2%XI2E7
)END

05-06-2003, 12:10 PM
ok, this is now erking me, what is this and how do i view this below:

__________________________________________________ __________

START(
%AJ7R1%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%JK6M5
%KJ5P7%LJ5N2%MO0D0%NK5Q5%OJ5M0%PH5F0%Ur1D2%VO8C9%W M3D2%XI2E7
)END
__________________________________________________ __________

thanx for any help.

CrispyFish
05-06-2003, 12:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote muujahid:</font><hr> ok, this is now erking me, what is this and how do i view this below:

__________________________________________________ __________

START(
%AJ7R1%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%JK6M5
%KJ5P7%LJ5N2%MO0D0%NK5Q5%OJ5M0%PH5F0%Ur1D2%VO8C9%W M3D2%XI2E7
)END
__________________________________________________ __________

thanx for any help. <hr /></blockquote>
Select everything from START to END (including START and END) and copy using your preferred method (I like Ctrl-C myself). Go to http://endeavor.med.nyu.edu/~wei/pool/pooltable2.html and click the Paste button. Click OK twice and click your heels together three times for good measure. All will be revealed. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

05-06-2003, 12:32 PM
cool, thanks and that's a simple shot.

i would play it with just a bit of hi top so that it rolls down the rail and then i can get the cue ball back to the center of the table for whatever shot i may want to shoot next.

ras314
05-06-2003, 12:33 PM
Black Jack...I was the guy you watched Scott try to teach how to stroke all day long last week. I have so many ingrained bad habits this was giving me fits and will continue to do so until I can get enough practice time in. I find my attention span is maybe 1/2 hr before getting sloppy. The drills help a good bit. Once the concentration is gone I feel practice can actually be detrimental.

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 01:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> Black Jack...I was the guy you watched Scott try to teach how to stroke all day long last week. I have so many ingrained bad habits this was giving me fits and will continue to do so until I can get enough practice time in. I find my attention span is maybe 1/2 hr before getting sloppy. The drills help a good bit. Once the concentration is gone I feel practice can actually be detrimental. <hr /></blockquote>

Dont feel bad. It took scott hours before he felt that my stroke was decent. then I practiced it a lot. I had another lesson with scott and except for a couple of tweaks, he said I had improved a lot.

Laura

dg-in-centralpa
05-06-2003, 03:20 PM
Over the fall and winter months, I usually practice an hour a day. During the summer, I don't get to practice as much because my busy season at work is spring and summer. I will play against myself and spend time just playing safe. Then I'll start setting shots I have trouble with and do 10 - 15 in a row.

DSAPOLIS
05-06-2003, 03:32 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> Black Jack...I was the guy you watched Scott try to teach how to stroke all day long last week. I have so many ingrained bad habits this was giving me fits and will continue to do so until I can get enough practice time in. I find my attention span is maybe 1/2 hr before getting sloppy. The drills help a good bit. Once the concentration is gone I feel practice can actually be detrimental. <hr /></blockquote>


Actually, you weren't doing half as bad as you think you were. With my students, it takes a while for all of the information to be ingested, then there is the digestive period for it. Your mind and body will get used to the intricacies of the stroke over time. It is like my break shot that you saw. It did not get that way over night. It has taken years to perfect it, and a lot of practice went into training my mind and body to work in unison to get the desired result. I haven't always been able to break like that. In a few weeks you will start to see a definite change in those areas of your game. Of course it will feel awkward at first, but after a while muscle memory will take over. For some the process is quicker, for some the process is painfully slow. Just stick with it.

Irish
05-06-2003, 05:09 PM
In my heyday when I started playing competitive pool I was spending about 8-10 hours a day 6 days a week at the pool hall. I played about 6 hours each day in money matches and tournament.

Right now I need to play about 1 hour a day just to stay at the same level I am at right now. I need to put about 2 hours a day into the game to improve now. The more I play above the 2 hours the more pure and natural my stroke gets. It also really depends on how I play. Solo practice of just running racks does alot for my game, as does playing in masters level tournaments. Playing in the occasional weaker tournament I can find where I am not known does nothing for my game, maybe makes it abit worse even. The key to getting better is shooting alot of pool to get the stroke feeling more and more natural and playing against better players that make you bare down and play your best to have a chance at winning.

The 1 hour a day you play might be enough for slow improvement. If you really want to make your game improve fast though you need to focus alot more time into it. Of course I dont know where you want to be in your game. If your goal is to be a SL4 (not sure of the APA system since I am Canadian but SL4 seems pretty low still) within a year maybe 1 hour a day is enough. If instead within a year you want to be playing in the womens masters event in Vegas you better put alot more time into the game and stop playing people who are so far below where you are striving to be.

bluewolf
05-06-2003, 07:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Irish:</font><hr>
Right now I need to play about 1 hour a day just to stay at the same level I am at right now. I need to put about 2 hours a day into the game to improve now. The more I play above the 2 hours the more pure and natural my stroke gets.

It also really depends on how I play. Solo practice of just running racks does alot for my game, as does playing in masters level tournaments.

The 1 hour a day you play might be enough for slow improvement. If you really want to make your game improve fast though you need to focus alot more time into it. Of course I dont know where you want to be in your game. If your goal is to be a SL4 (not sure of the APA system since I am Canadian but SL4 seems pretty low still) within a year maybe 1 hour a day is enough. If instead within a year you want to be playing in the womens masters event in Vegas you better put alot more time into the game and stop playing people who are so far below where you are striving to be. <hr /></blockquote>

I have been building up my table time, although right now is still short increments, 4-5 times during the day.

If you do not play apa, I am sure those numbers do not mean much. When a person gets to an sl5,imo, they are getting to be decent shooters and can bank and do pretty good on position. An apa 7 is much more refined in everything. Since 7 is the highest the apa numbers go in 8 ball,you will see variation in players . Some are A players and many are B players, if the lettering system makes any sense.

My goals are pretty lofty and dont involve sl4 but I also have shorterm ones. And the one I am working on right now is to hit 80% on long cuts. The long straightins are easy, rail shots are not too hard,.Long hard cuts are what I am working on now.

I do play better against better players because I have to go all out and be shooting my best, focusing my best and everything. When I get matched up against players who are not as good as I am, I play lazy, even though I beat them.

And I enjoy playing very good players because I can learn. When I play them I get a spot, but probably a bigger spot than I should have.Like when I played my apa7 hubbie 9ball apa style, which is the number of balls you get in, my spot was too big and he had to get in a bunch more balls to beat me. It was like 19 for me and 55 for him.

I think a big problem I was having did not involve the stroke.Until I master a particular shot, it is not by feel for me. I was having trouble holding the image in my mind til I got around behind the shot and lined up, so that is why I believe I was missing them. Now I am saying a mantra to hold the image, as silly as that seems. But they are going in at a high rate and I am seeing 80% on these shots real soon, right now maybe is 60-70% in the last few days. before that it was 25-50% so that is a big jump.

Laura

Mike H
05-06-2003, 11:03 PM
My practice sessions were short (2-3 hours)and sparse (1-3 times a week) over the last 6 months, back and neck problems were slowing me down a bit. I feel a little better now, to the point where I'm ready to start going hard again. That for me is either 6 or 7 days a week, with 2 4-5 hour sessions, and 5 8-12 hour sessions. Hopefully it will be a bit less strenuous with 50 pounds less to haul around the table.

ras314
05-07-2003, 01:02 AM
I should qualify the 1/2 hr, actually mean with breaks in between, total maybe 2 hours per day anytime I can get to a table. Point is just banging balls does nothing good for me.

BTW am starting to get comfortable with the stroke, having trouble getting way more english than I'm used too. Will take a while to approach Scott's level of control.

bluewolf
05-07-2003, 04:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Mike H:</font><hr> My practice sessions were short (2-3 hours)and sparse (1-3 times a week) over the last 6 months, back and neck problems were slowing me down a bit. I feel a little better now, to the point where I'm ready to start going hard again. That for me is either 6 or 7 days a week, with 2 4-5 hour sessions, and 5 8-12 hour sessions. Hopefully it will be a bit less strenuous with 50 pounds less to haul around the table. <hr /></blockquote>

That was me . Physical problems held me back for several months.Feeling better Now am working to going full tilt.

Laura

stickman
05-07-2003, 06:57 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif