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05-07-2003, 05:39 PM
is there an affordable lathe for tipping and minor shaft work ? I have a rapid cue top sander , but it cuts at an angle. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Cueless Joey
05-07-2003, 06:09 PM
Harbor Freight sells cheap small lathes.

pooldaddy9
05-07-2003, 07:25 PM
I found one on ebay that is perfect for doing tips and cleaning.

griffith_d
05-08-2003, 05:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote rawpaak:</font><hr> is there an affordable lathe for tipping and minor shaft work ? I have a rapid cue top sander , but it cuts at an angle. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif <hr /></blockquote>

I am not sure of your budget, but here are some sites:

http://www.cuesmith.com/main/lathes/micro_3/index.php

http://www.shaftmaster.com/

http://www.uniqueinc.com/

Griff

SpiderMan
05-08-2003, 03:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote rawpaak:</font><hr> is there an affordable lathe for tipping and minor shaft work ? I have a rapid cue top sander , but it cuts at an angle. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif <hr /></blockquote>

You can do both tip and ferrule replacements with this or a similar metalworking lathe, plus it is versatile enough to handle chores not pool-cue-related:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=33684

It's currently on sale at the retail outlets for $359. If you don't mind buying from an outfit without local representation, then I believe Fred notes that Homiers has it for $299 plus shipping.

SpiderMan

Rod
05-08-2003, 05:33 PM
Spidey,
What retail outlets? BTW I think the better investment is th 8"x 12". 3/4 hp motor and a 3/4" spindle bore. There is also a 170 lb weight difference. Seems like it should be much better built. Only a hundred more.

Rod

SpiderMan
05-09-2003, 09:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> Spidey,
What retail outlets? BTW I think the better investment is th 8"x 12". 3/4 hp motor and a 3/4" spindle bore. There is also a 170 lb weight difference. Seems like it should be much better built. Only a hundred more.

Rod <hr /></blockquote>

Rod,

Harbor Freight has lots of storefronts in this part of the country. There's a Harbor Freight store about 5 miles from my house. They honor all of the online sale prices on in-stock merchandise.

Yes, the larger lathe would be more solid, but either would be fine for tip and ferrule, and both are still too short to get a whole shaft in front of you at once. Obviously getting that much more metal mass would make for a more solid working envoronment. I think, though, that the 170 lb difference is shipping weight, without the extra crating the lathe weight difference is less. And if you have to pay for shipping, I'm not sure what the cost difference would be. Of course, if you live near a HF retail outlet shipping is not an issue.

I mentioned the 7x10 because the original guy wanted least expense, and also I think the smaller lathe might make an interesting portable retipping station.

Another interesting point is that you can buy the 7x10 mini-lathe for about the same price as the (completely manual) Willard tipping tool, and have a much more versatile piece of gear.

SpiderMan

Popcorn
05-09-2003, 10:06 AM
I think a lathe is one of the coolest tools a guy can have. I should not say guy, because my wife is a pretty good lathe operator. If you go to google and click on groups. type in 7 x 10 lathe, there is a lot of information on small lathes. Some have whole web sites devoted to them. If I can get my camera to work, I will take a picture of my favorite lathe I have. It is a copy of a lathe my wife saw at Gus Szambotis shop, with inboard and outboard chucks. I only saw the pictures she took of it, but Gus gave me advice on the phone for building it. It would be fun to see pictures of what some of the guys on here have in their home shops if they feel like posting them.

Rod
05-09-2003, 11:28 AM
I found one here less than 10 miles. The 7x10 doesn't give a motor size. 3/4 hp is a lot for a small lathe. The larger spindle bore may prove to be a real advantage on other jobs. That plus the larger swing can't hurt either. Like you said, if a guy only did tips and ferrules the smaller one is more than adequate.

Rod

SpiderMan
05-09-2003, 12:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> I found one here less than 10 miles. <hr /></blockquote>

I'm assuming you mean you found a Harbor Freight store, they're interesting aren't they? Fill out the card to get on their mailing list for sales flyers, there are always a couple of items that are too good to pass up.

Last month I bought one of those plastic "head-visor" binocular magnifiers for working on ferrules and tips. It had the standard set of lenses, a magnification booster set (still binocular) that flipped down to double the magnification, then one monocular lense that would swing in front of the right eye to boost the magnification even further. Plus, it had battery-operated lights at each temple. This is very handy, because when you get down really close your head blocks any other light. Anyway, I bought two of these things (one for me and the other I gave to Sid V) for TWO DOLLARS AND FIFTY CENTS EACH!!!! Never would have known about the two-day-only price if not for the mailer.

SpiderMan