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Predator314
05-13-2003, 10:45 AM
I might be getting my hands on a metal lathe rather cheap. I family member has one that works great and is willing to sell it to me.

I've never used a lathe for anything (including cue repairs). I've never watched anyone use one either. Can someone point me to some resources on what I would need to do cue repairs (tips, tapering, etc) and maybe eventually trying to make a cue?

travellerdl2
05-13-2003, 11:59 AM
Hi Predator314,
I just saw this on Ebay,, I know nothing about it (good or bad).
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3608075013&category=21 212
See you in June! Mark

heater451
05-13-2003, 02:46 PM
You can check Google groups--you could post questions in rec.crafts.metalworking. (If you're unfamiliar w/ Google groups, just go to http://www.google.com/ and click the "Groups" tab.

Otherwise, the basic concept of a lathe is this:

1. A workpiece is mounted between "centers"--one on the "headstock", and the other on a "tailstock". On a metal lathe, the headstock will have a "chuck", but a wood lathe can have a chuck or a special center tool, such as a "spur center" (this grips the wood with 'prongs', for lack of a better term). Also, the tailstock is not always used, if a chuck is holding the workpiece.

2. The workpiece is "turned" between the centers (basically, it spins, but "spinning" actually applies to another type of lathe). A tool is applied to the workpiece, in order to shave it down to the desired diameter(s). A metal lathe will use a toolbit, held in a "toolpost" (SEE #3). A wood lathe makes do with only a "rest", upon which a chisel, gouge, or "parting" tool is rested (get it?).

3. On a wood lathe, the tool is angled into the workpiece, and basically scrapes away material--actually "cutting" requires a slighly different technique, and experience. You need 'feel' to work wood this way--a metal lathe is more precision ('by the numbers'). The toolpost on a metal lathe sets on a "cross-slide", which is a platform that is adjusted in minute increments along perpendicular axes. The adjustments are performed by turning threaded rods ("screws"). If you understand how a bench vise opens and closes, you should understand how it works.


Here are some links:

(Chapter 3) http://www.nmri.go.jp/eng/khirata/metalwork/index_e.html

http://www.efunda.com/processes/machining/turn.cfm

http://prl.stanford.edu/documents/obsolete/wood_lathe.pdf

DIYnet.com (http://www.diynet.com/DIY/article/0,2058,9572,00.html)


As for cue-specific tips/instruction, you might check out http://www.barringercues.com or order the Chris Hightower book or videos at http://www.cuesmith.com .

Also:

http://www.woodturningontheweb.com/poolcue.html

http://www.poolshark.com/cues.htm

http://www.cuemakers.org/


And of course, don't forget that there are a few cuemakers (-"builders") here on the CCB, who are probably willing to help you.
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Rod
05-13-2003, 02:54 PM
[ QUOTE ]
The toolpost on a metal lathe sets on a "cross-slide", which is a platform that is adjusted in minute increments along perpendicular axes. <hr /></blockquote>

Yes and in my search all the mini lathes have a little problem in this area. The tool post is a little weak. I'm going to buy one sooner or later but it will need a modification. A guy needs a lathe, doesn't he? It's been years since I worked on one.

Rod

heater451
05-13-2003, 03:21 PM
I believe they are Chinese built, but they seem sturdy enough.

The 7x12" seems about comparable to others--in fact, Harbor Freight might actually be selling the Grizzly brand. . . .(Otherwise, the 7x10" seems to be the same at HF and Northern Tools.)

I haven't seen anything else in the same size and price range as the 9x19" ($795), but eBay might be good for that.

Personally, if I had the cash and the room, I would probably go all out for a 36-40" length lathe. Gotta find a cheap freight outfit as well. . . .



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heater451
05-13-2003, 05:14 PM
Forgot to add the Grizzly link:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/items-list.cfm?key=460010&amp;sort=price

And here's one for a place that sells Jet:

http://www.southern-tool.com/store/jet_bd920_belt_drive_metal_working_lathe.html



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Cueless Joey
05-13-2003, 05:37 PM
This one is worht a look.
Even though it has no thread gear so you have to use Joe's Mickey Mouse taps and dies.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&amp;item=3608016941&amp;category=12 92

Rod
05-13-2003, 05:38 PM
Here is a good link. They are a little different but some are made in the same factory.
Lathes (http://littlemachineshop.com/Info/minilathe.php)

It would always be good to have a small one. Yes a 40 incher is a real lathe and better quality. Actually the 9" has the same spindle bore as the 7" models. Unless you needed the bed length there is not a real advantage other than a larger chuck. It depends on what you need it for. Man they start getting heavy. It's called put it here and it ain't moving. I'd like to have a bigger one but I need to be sure of where I'll be living. LOL

Rod

Fred Agnir
05-15-2003, 08:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Predator314:</font><hr> I've never used a lathe for anything (including cue repairs). I've never watched anyone use one either. Can someone point me to some resources on what I would need to do cue repairs (tips, tapering, etc) and maybe eventually trying to make a cue? <hr /></blockquote>IMO, you have no business trying to run a metal lathe without someone showing you the basics. I don't think that reading about them is going to do it. That being said, I would urge you to take a shop class at the local vocational school.

The Chris Hightower Cuebuilding Book is a good resource to at least give yourself some background (and a lot more) information.

Fred

Candyman
05-17-2003, 08:26 PM
Quote Fred Agnir:

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IMO, you have no business trying to run a metal lathe without someone showing you the basics. I don't think that reading about them is going to do it. That being said, I would urge you to take a shop class at the local vocational school
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This is great advice. I am a retired machinist and it takes a lot of training to become really proficient. Running metal lathes can be dangerous if safety precautions aren't followed. You can visit most any large machine shop and count fingers and usually come up with an odd number. /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif

hadenball
05-29-2003, 10:55 AM
hey 314, I have an enco and I love it, I did repairs for years on a craftsman woodlathe but it's nothing like doing them on a metal or cue lathe.www.cuesmith.com, chris hightower sells a book for 75.00 all about everything to do with a cue, repair,taper, from tree to tradeshow.It is very informative, and it has lots of drawings and illustration for just about everything, well worth twice the cost.He also designs and builds cue making equiptment and some lathes.He has some cuerepair and building videos but I haven't seen any of them, I prefer the book, no rewinding lol.Good luck and let me know how it turns out. haden