PDA

View Full Version : Bridge length



bluewolf
05-17-2003, 02:14 PM
When I first started playing pool, I was using a 5" bridge length. I was told by many that this wasnt long enough, so went to a 6", then an 8" and it got longer.

I was on Fast Larry's site , and he had an article which talked about bridge length and what length were used by the older pool players.

I also remember awhile back, someone (Chis, Rod, TomCincy) dont remember who, just that it was a good pool player on ccb, saying they used a shorted bridge on long shots for accuracy.

Well I tried out this 5" bridge, and that Larry talks about on his site and WW tried out the 7" one. My potting % went up about 50% and ww said that his shape was better.

What bridge length do you use?

Laura

Tom_In_Cincy
05-17-2003, 02:23 PM
bw
My bridge length varies on different shot requirements.
(you certainly don't use an 8 inch bridge while on the rail, do you?)

Long shots I use between a 5 and 8 inch bridge, shorter for accuracy longer for position needs.

Short BL for most small distance shots. (less than 4 feet)
Longer BL for the rest of the normal shots.

Most of the stun shots I use a short bridge length. It gives me a better feel of the action.

Its just my way of playing. There are a players that are much better than I am at this game that use an 8-10 inch bridge anytime they can. I just never felt comfortable/confident using that much of a bridge.

Fred Agnir
05-17-2003, 04:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>

What bridge length do you use?

Laura <hr /></blockquote>I don't know. I don't think anyone really knows. They change bridge lengths depending on the shot. And me, I thought I had about an 8" bridge, but when I saw it on video, it must have been 10" or more. That seems to be more common with today's 9-ball players.

Fred

Rod
05-17-2003, 04:13 PM
A short bridge length is very accurate. We can't shoot all shots with a short bridge though. I use what the shot calls for. More power=longer, to a point. Med length for the garden variety shots and short for some specialty shots. There is any length in between these depending on what I feel is needed. My std bridge length is between 8 and 9 inches. But a fair amount of shots I'll shoot closer to 7". It just depends.

In a post yesterday to you, I explained a little more detail. I'll just do a quckie. What's just as important when you change bridge lengths is move your back hand in the same relationship. That being so your back hand will hang straight down or perpendicular.

5"is very short especially if you need a little more zip. It is however accurate to just make a ball. Mosconi was in the 7" range, but all he played was 14-1. It's common for 9 ball players to have a longer bridge. 7" is a good length especially for those that may not strike the cue ball exact. I think everyone, especially newer players should be aware of how much cue is hanging out there.

Rod

Yuppie
05-17-2003, 05:23 PM
I've been taught that every shot should be the same. Your bridge length should all be a part of your pre-shot routine. I think.

I would say I typically have a 6-8 inch bridge for every shot unless you need to punch at the CB or if the CB and OB are close together. Then you use a shorter bridge.

I find that if I cannot see the length and line of the bridge (because my fingers are in the way when using a short bridge) I tend to miss shots. The length of your cue coming out from your closed bridge is like the barrel of a rifle. The CB will go in the direction that line is pointing. If you cannot see that line, you have no idea where that CB is going.

bluewolf
05-17-2003, 06:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> A short bridge length is very accurate. We can't shoot all shots with a short bridge though. I use what the shot calls for. More power=longer, to a point. Med length for the garden variety shots and short for some specialty shots. Rod <hr /></blockquote>

Another point. When using the shorter bridge, i was very accurate. In my normal low stance, while using that short bridge, within an hour, everything about my body hurt, my neck back etc. I was okay using that bridge if I stood up more, however.

I was just wondering if your stance changes with your bridge length.

Laura

Rod
05-17-2003, 07:09 PM
If you keep the normal relationship whether long or short I can't think of a reason why it would effect you. Essentially nothing changes there. What might happen is you have to stretch more for some shots. In that case you could use a longer bridge and lengthen you back hand, the stance is the same. A big part of this game is repetition, making changes usually comes at a price.

Maybe it was just a not so good day. Some days might be better than others, eh? LOL

Rod

arn3
05-17-2003, 08:20 PM
they did a survey long long ago and the average bridge was measured at about 11".

05-20-2003, 07:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> In a post yesterday to you, I explained a little more detail. I'll just do a quckie. What's just as important when you change bridge lengths is move your back hand in the same relationship. That being so your back hand will hang straight down or perpendicular.

How would moving your bridge hand affect the perpendicular hanging of your grip hand?

Rod
05-20-2003, 10:18 AM
Davis,
If you move your bridge hand then it won't change. I don't suggest that either. Your set up at the table is like a tripod. It has three balance points, each foot/leg and the bridge point. If you move one point it can effect the balance of the tripod, your body. Yes you can bend your arm more and move the bridge point closer to your body but that puts more stress on that point. The bridge should be set at X distance from your body and kept there. That is part of your normal stance. Yes there are exceptions of course.

From there (while holding the cue) the only way to change bridge length would be to move your back hand forward (for a longer bridge) or back (for a short bridge). Well that won't work either because moving your back hand forward puts it past vertical or back puts it before vertical. The only way is change your grip position in relation to bridge length. So you don't move your bridge hand, you change where the cue is held.

People normally adjust for this during their set up. However many don't make the adjustment well and their back hand ends up way forward or sometimes to far back. It doesn't have to be perfect but fairly close. When you get use to the feel of perpendicular, you'll know if it is off.

Rod