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View Full Version : Jacoby Cues and Madsen's Billiards?



Yuppie
05-20-2003, 09:03 PM
Anyone have experience with Jacoby Cues and can give testimony about them? Also, has anyone bought from Madsen's Billiards in Licoln, NE?

cycopath
05-21-2003, 03:36 AM
My Jacoby is a quality cue. Excellent workmanship and solid feel. Just took a while for me to get mine, like 4 months direct from Jacoby.

Ralph S.
05-21-2003, 06:03 AM
I bought a Jacoby cue while at the 2002 DCC in Louisville. They are are a very fine cue for the money. I didnt have to wait though as what I liked was already on site.

05-21-2003, 06:07 AM
I HAVE FRIENDS THAT SHOOT WITH JACOBYS..VERY NICE STICKS..A CUSTOM DESIGN JACOBY WILL BE MY NEXT..AFTER I GET MY USE OUT OF MY NEW SCHÖN,,
MADSEN'S BOUGHT OUT TOMS Q STIX.IF I HAD A NEED AND THEY HAD THE PRODUCT,I WOULD DEAL WITH THEM.. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Yuppie
05-21-2003, 08:27 AM
Thanx for the replies.

Now here's a few more questions:
1. What makes the price difference between a custom and production cue?

2. Is the hit really all that much different?

3. Will I notice the difference? I don't know what my skill level is, but my high run in straight pool is 14 and I've been playing very hard since November.

4. I have a Lucasi. What are the MAJOR differences between a custom and my Lucasi?

Fred Agnir
05-21-2003, 08:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Yuppie:</font><hr> Thanx for the replies.

Now here's a few more questions:
1. What makes the price difference between a custom and production cue?

<font color="green">Economy of scale. Streamlined production. Less setup time per cue.</font color>

2. Is the hit really all that much different?

<font color="green">Yes. No. Every brand of cue hits differently. Production or one-of-a-kind. Some extremely expensive one-ofs are virtually unplayable. And vice versa.</font color>

3. Will I notice the difference? I don't know what my skill level is, but my high run in straight pool is 14 and I've been playing very hard since November.

<font color="green"> You'll notice a difference between any brand cue. I think the biggest advantage of buying a one-of-kind, unique-to-you cue is that you get to choose much of the construction and final product. IMO, buying a pre-made high-end cue isn't much different than buying any cue from any production maker. It's already made, you don't specify anything, but most likely, it will be pretty unique, you'll like the cue's aesthetics, and hopefully, you like the way that cue hits.
</font color>


4. I have a Lucasi. What are the MAJOR differences between a custom and my Lucasi?

<font color="green">Individual attention and individuality in general. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>


Fred &lt;~~~ doesn't like the term "custom cue"

Fred Agnir
05-21-2003, 09:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Yuppie:</font><hr> 1. What makes the price difference between a custom and production cue?
<hr /></blockquote>As to the terms "custom" and "production," those are tough definitions since I believe most people really mean "high volume" vs. "low volume." And ask a "production" cuemaker about the term "custom," and I'm sure they/he will include his company in that definition.


And a completely different description is the "one-of-a-kind" and "per customer specifications" cues.

Ask Jerry Pechauer if he believes he is a "custom cuemaker." I know he thinks he is one, and I won't argue that even though he pumps out a production line of cues.

Where does a Jacoby or a Schuler fit? I consider both of these excellent cuemaking outfits as moderate volume production cues that can do one-of-a-kind cues. Schuler doesn't really do "per customer specifications" cues. I'm guessing that Jacoby doesn't either. The fact that I define them as "production" doesn't take anything away from their excellence and their individual attention.

What about Southwest? They do what they call "fancy cues," apart from their regular cues, but are their standard cues "custom"? Well, they are made one at a time per customer order, but not really "per customer specifications." But each gets a more personal look than , say, a McDermott production line cue.

In my world (which represents much of any manufacturing world) the terms "custom" and "production" are not mutually exclusive. We produce custom molded products. The products are customer specified and ordered (definition of custom), but the end produce is mass-produced and are available to anyone. And anymore, the word "custom" seems to describe anything that departs from a "standard" even if that departure was 100 years ago. Like the 2-piece cue, I suppose.

Fred