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Popcorn
05-23-2003, 12:05 PM
I am buying a new computer this week, and I am already dizzy. I need some suggestions. I don't play games or anything so I won't need that kind of stuff. I do word processing, the net maybe some photo stuff with my camera but that is about it. I never intended to use this computer for five years but I guess my needs were so small it has been all I have needed. I think I feel like getting something new though as a treat for myself. My wife wants a Dell, but she see all the ads so I don't want to go by that. I just need some help with it, I don't plan on going nuts over it, I just don't want to be sorry later. Thank in advance.

05-23-2003, 12:27 PM
What price are you looking to spend? You should be able to get a good system for under 1k. www.compusa.com (http://www.compusa.com) has some good deals.

Sid_Vicious
05-23-2003, 12:43 PM
Make this work two ways...first the PC will be adequate, easy to get and competitive. Number 2, the wife is happy.

"Buy the Dell next time you see one of their 4-5 hundred, total delivered to your door deals."

Hassling over the small stuff with PC purchases has gotten to be un-fun. Seriously, you can go the right way twice with this one(IMHO.) sid

9 Ball Girl
05-23-2003, 12:43 PM
Dell's are good. I'm thinking something basic for you like this:


Dimension 2350 Series: Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor at 2.20GHz with 512K L2 Cache
Memory: FREE UPGRADE! 256MB DDR SDRAM
Keyboard: Dell® Quietkey® Keyboard
Monitor: New 17 in E171FPb Flat Panel Display
Video Card: Integrated Intel® Extreme 3D Graphics
Hard Drive: 30GB Value Hard Drive
Floppy Drive and Additional Storage Devices: 3.5 in Floppy Drive
Operating System: Microsoft® Windows® XP Home Edition¹²
Mouse: Dell® 2-button scroll mouse
Network Interface: Integrated 10/100 Ethernet
Modem: 56K PCI Data/Fax Modem
CD or DVD Drive: FREE UPGRADE! 48x/24x/48x Max CD-RW Drive
Sound Card: Integrated Audio
Speakers: New Harman Kardon® HK-206 Speakers
Bundled Software: WordPerfect® Productivity Pack with Quicken New User Edition
Security Software: Dell SecurityCenter by McAfee, 90-day introductory offer
Digital Music: Dell Jukebox powered by MUSICMATCH
Digital Photography: Dell Picture Studio Image Expert Standard
Limited Warranty, Services and Support Options: 2 Year Limited Warranty plus 2 Year At-Home Service
Dial-Up Internet Access: 6 Months of America Online Membership Included
Multi-Media Players: RealOne™ Player, with 14 day SuperPass trial
High Speed Internet Access: Find a high speed Internet service provider in your area
Mail-in Rebate: Save $150 with mail-in rebate. Price shown before rebate.

Price $1,009.00

You can always take the monitor off if you want to keep the one you have now and you can take the floppy drive off if you don't need one. HTH

eg8r
05-23-2003, 01:55 PM
Since your needs are not that demanding, I would just go to a local computer store to get one. You don't have to get any of the latest and greatest anything, and if something happens they are right there to fix it.

eg8r <~~Builds my own computers.

eg8r
05-23-2003, 01:56 PM
Yup, Dell always offers a computer for around 500 or so (gotta wait for the sale). The computers are not the best but given his needs, they will be perfect.

eg8r

Rod
05-23-2003, 04:14 PM
Take your time, your's is still working. Dell does have some great deals at times but their reviews are terrible.
They were once noted for good customer service, that is not necessarily true now. Type in Dell and read the reviews.
reseller ratings (http://www.resellerratings.com/index.pl)

I would check local smaller computer stores first. I'm not real fond of the large chain stores. You don't need anything special, it could be bought fairly cheap. If you use your keyboard, monitor, and mouse all you need is the tower. If you do buy a mouse, buy an optical. For windows XP have at least 256 MB of DDR Ram. A fair amount of money can be saved buy not buying the latest and greatest where ever you buy, which you don't need. Believe me a 1.5 GHz processor will fly compared to your old machine and they are cheap. The latest now is 3 GHz and expensive. Just using an example.

Rod

heater451
05-23-2003, 06:57 PM
I think that's a "lost leader" type of price.

In the past, I have gone to the Dell site, seeking a $500-700 PC. The problem is, it's like an auto sales "package":

"You want more RAM? Then you'll have to get the DVD-Recorder and video editing software too, and it's only an extra $300. . . ."

Also, I have dealt with the Dell tech "not so much" support. They usually wind up being helpful, but it will cost you a few days of your life (trust me on this).

For a base computer at a good price, I still recommend eMachines, which can be found at the local Best Buy for around $300-500. Some other manufacturers are getting into the same price range as well--I think CompUSA was moving older HPs or Compaqs at good prices.

As it is, Popcorn can probably benefit from a RAM increase ($25-50), and maybe a processor upgrade, if the mobo supports it. (btw, PIIs and PIIIs can be a bit pricey--it might be worth risking an eBay transaction). If needing to upgrade the HDD in addition, going with a new system is probably better--in which case I'd go with the cheapest package (considering the proposed usage) and add RAM immediately.

It should also be noted that some older apps have compatibility issues--less, as the preferred OS is newer (that is, 95 apps will have the most issues, a few w/ 98, and little to none for 2k). Also, some folks don't enjoy the XP user interface 'culture-shock'--although it can be changed to "Classic".

One more thing, if considering a processor upgrade, www.pricewatch.com (http://www.pricewatch.com) should give some idea of pricing.



============================

bluewolf
05-23-2003, 08:30 PM
E machines suck. Toshiba gives the best support but they dont make desktops that I am arare of.

If you go to circuit city or comp usa, it is best to buy the middle range price range of what they offer.

If you go for the cheapest, you get crap.
If you go for the most expensive, you get bells and whistles that you do not need.

Dell is good as long as you do not get their cheapest one.

All brands have a lower priced model and most of them are crap.

Go for middle price range in what you get.

my .02

Laura

cueball1950
05-23-2003, 10:42 PM
JUST go to DELL.com. they always have great buys there on new and also refurbished. i have a dell 1.4 and absolutely love it

eg8r
05-23-2003, 11:04 PM
I am not a fan of Dell support and definitely have a bad taste in my mouth. You bring up EMachines, I was wondering if you know if they have fixed their power supply problem. When I worked at a local computer store, we sent back (to emachines) an incredible % of sold computers. I do not recommend them at all unless this has been fixed.

Dell does hide costs, however given the examples of future use, I think a bare bones kit will work fine. RAM is cheaper on the net anyways.

Another issue with buying a computer like Dell, Gateway, Emachines, Compaq etc is warranty work. You will have to ship your computer away to get it fixed if the need arises. Another issue that sometimes comes up is proprietary hardware. If you have a Dell and the power supply dies you cannot just go to Best Buy and get a power supply. You have to buy a Dell power supply.

I still think the best bet is to buy a computer from a local builder. Most all of them offer a warranty and do all the work in house. I would compare prices between different ones and do a little homework before just buying the first one you come to, but other than that, I think the local ma and pa store is a good deal.

eg8r

Rich R.
05-24-2003, 05:17 AM
If money is an issue, and your unit is not too old, you may want to go to a local computer shop and have your current CPU upgraded. They can replace and upgrade just about anything in your unit and add stuff too. This can be a lot less expensive than buying a new one.

I did this once a number of years ago. It only cost me a couple hundred dollars and it worked fine until I was required to make some major changes to my system. Then I bought a totally new system.

bluewolf
05-24-2003, 05:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> I am not a fan of Dell support and definitely have a bad taste in my mouth. You bring up EMachines, I was wondering if you know if they have fixed their power supply problem. When I worked at a local computer store, we sent back (to emachines) an incredible % of sold computers. I do not recommend them at all unless this has been fixed.


eg8r <hr /></blockquote>

Good points. And to go off somewhat on a tangent:

I worked in sales at circuit city computer department. In that environment, i got to see which computers were brought back more frequently than others, ie which models had problems more frequently.

Emachines, cheap HPs, I would stay away from the cheapest. Some of these companies had high end good computers. When the e-machine came out and was so much cheaper, other companies like compac and Hp came out with cheaper models so that they could compete in that market, which is the persons who are looking for the cheapest thing they could find. It is really bad for these companies because many of their computers (the cheaper ones) come back (returned to the store due to defects), which does not help the reputation of the company.

There are generally three classes of buyers:

1 The person who wants the cheapest thing that they can get.
2 The person who wants a good computer but not top of the line.
3 The person who wants the hottest thing. These people frequently buy new computers often. I would fall into this category. A new laptop once a year and a new desktop every other year.

One word of warning about going into circuit city or compusa. Their computers are from companies such as compac,HP, Sony etc. Most of these have integrated mother boards. This means that the sound card and/or video cards are sautered into the board. What this means is if at some point you wanted better video or sound, it is a pain to put a new sound or video card in and make that work and would probably require a technician to do this for you.

BTW- If you are into photo stuff, I would get a good video card and it also makes the stuff on the monitor look better.

If you order from a company such as Dell or Gateway (not pushing either one), you can ask which models have non-integrated mother boards. If you go with a local computer place, you can specify how you want it built.

Most computers come with a one year warranty parts and labor but this does not cover the software. One word of caution. Some companies (like my gateway) with sell you on their great 3 year warranty, only to find out later that the monitor, which was included in the price package is not covered.

As far as extended service goes, circuit city still has the best one, covers computer, and every thing that came with it and also the monitor and it does cover power surge damage, which most companies do not cover.

I think that desktop computers are pretty hardy. Personally, I would not get extended service unless I was paying a lot for the system. However, I would get it on a monitor. Computers can usually be inexpensively fixed, monitors can go out in two years or last forever.Where a computer can usually be fixed, if a monitor goes out, it is dead.

The only thing I always get it on is laptops, but since it does not appear that you are considering one of those, I will not go into why.

Anyway, lots of folks do not get extended service, but if you do choose to get it from whoever you are getting the computer from, I would ask a lot of questions about what is covered.

It used to be that you could not go wrong with a dell. As with all companies entering the cheaper market, to me it seems that dell is not better than the other companies. Most companies use the same parts, ie sound cards.

It is the private computer builder that can tailor make you system to your liking and you can also specify which video cards, sound cards etc that you would like.If you go this route, I would ask what kind of guarantee or warrantee goes witht system. I would also go with a shop which has been around awhile, has a lucritive business and appears that they will not fold. It is also nice if you can ask people you know about that shop, to see if they were pleased with the product and the support.

Laura

bluewolf
05-24-2003, 07:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9 Ball Girl:</font><hr> Dell's are good. I'm thinking something basic for you like this:

<font color="blue"> </font color> These would be my recommendations </font color>


Dimension 2350 Series: Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor at 2.20GHz with 512K L2 Cache

<font color="blue"> </font color> Pentium 4 with at least 2.0 ghz [color]

Memory: 256MB DDR SDRAM <font color="blue"> </font color> 512 ddr, upgradable to at least 1.o gb </font color>
Keyboard: Dell® Quietkey® Keyboard
Monitor: New 17 in E171FPb Flat Panel Display
Video Card: Integrated Intel® Extreme 3D Graphics

<font color="blue"> </font color> 64 mb for excellent photo and clarity on screen although could get by with 32 . You would need to ask if the video card is sautered into the mother board. That is how it sounds .</font color>

Hard Drive: 30GB Value Hard Drive

<font color="blue"> </font color> 40-80 gb hard drive </font color>
CD or DVD Drive: FREE UPGRADE! 48x/24x/48x Max CD-RW Drive

<font color="blue"> </font color> two cds. One is a cd/dvd, the other is a rewritable cd. you will like this. you can copy your pictures onto the rewritable cd and store them to look at any time you want to .</font color>

Sound Card: Integrated Audio

<font color="blue"> </font color> The above audio sounds like the sound card is integrated into the mother board. Not good if you ever want to upgrade. I recommend soundblaster </font color>

Bundled Software: WordPerfect® Productivity Pack with Quicken New User Edition

<font color="blue"> </font color> Hardly anybody uses word perfect. I would at least want microsoft word on my computer. I really like the ones that come with Office professional, which is spreadsheet, database etc, but if you are only using for word processing, I would recommend word, since that is what most of the computer world uses, and if someone sends you a file, it is usually in word. [/color

Security Software: Dell SecurityCenter by McAfee, 90-day introductory offer

<font color="blue"> </font color> Norton is better. I would not worry about what is on the computer, I would just go out and buy the newest version of norton from a computer store .
</font color>

Digital Music: Dell Jukebox powered by MUSICMATCH

Digital Photography: Dell Picture Studio Image Expert Standard

<font color="blue"> </font color> I do not know what you are doing with your photos or what your needs are in that area. If you are not into real serious stuff like photo editing with photoshop or similar program, the software that came with your camera will probably meet your needs . </font color>

Limited Warranty, Services and Support Options: 2 Year Limited Warranty plus 2 Year At-Home Service

<font color="blue"> </font color> The operative word here is LIMITED. This means that there is something that is not covered. I would ask lots of questions . </font color>

Dial-Up Internet Access: 6 Months of America Online Membership Included

Multi-Media Players: RealOne&amp;#8482; Player, with 14 day SuperPass trial
High Speed Internet Access: Find a high speed Internet service provider in your area
Mail-in Rebate: Save $150 with mail-in rebate. Price shown before rebate.

Price $1,009.00

You can always take the monitor off if you want to keep the one you have now and you can take the floppy drive off if you don't need one. HTH
__________________________________
<font color="blue"> </font color> This sounds like a lot of junk, ie software on there that you dont need. Most companies do this to make it look like you are getting all of this awesome stuff. It is a sales gimic.

This computer sounds over priced to me. By at least 200 dollars. This is dell's cheaper end stuff.Also, this rebate stuff is also a gimmic too. Many have rebates to make it look like you are getting a better deal than you are. From my experience, at least 60% of rebates never come back. If you are going dell, I would go midrange price and be careful about that limited warranty stuff and what that means. When I bought my gateway, the lower end computer had a worse warranty than the one I bought which was more expensive. Also, found out the monitor was not covered. I was niave. I was used to circuit city where every thing is covered if you buy extended service.</font color>

LaurA

MikeM
05-24-2003, 07:09 AM
I second the Dell recommendation. I'm on my fourth Dell now (we currently have three) and I've been very satisfied. Whenever there has been a problem their customer service has ALWAYS been great. I've heard form others that they have had customer service problems but I've never seen it

MM

Kato
05-24-2003, 07:23 AM
I also have a Dell which I've upgraded. When I bought my 8200 it had a 20 gig hard drive and only 126MB of RAM (I've learned since) I added an 80 gHZ hard drive and bumped the RAM to 512 and am about to double the RAM again. For a non-computer guy I've been very pleased with my Dell. My Mom who builds computers in her spare time has both a Dell desktop and my Dad has a Dell laptop, both are very satisfied.

Kato~~~didn't realize Mike M could count to 4 /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Rich R.
05-24-2003, 07:44 AM
The office where I work has all Dell computers. The number would be in the many thousands.
I won't kid you and say that we never have problems, but considering that they are in use from 8 to 11 hours a day, 5 to 7 days a week, they are holding up very well. The hardware problems are very few, compared to the number of computers in use.

eg8r
05-24-2003, 08:53 AM
I think his box is 5 years old (did I read his post wrong?). At that rate he will probably have to buy a new motherboard and processor if he wanted to upgrade the processor.

eg8r

Rich R.
05-24-2003, 10:26 AM
eg8r, after re-reading it myself, I believe you read it correctly. I missed that the first time.

I am not too computer savvy, but I do know that the unit I had upgraded was well over 5 years old when I had it upgraded. IIRC, I the upgraded a 386 up to boarder line pentium. At the time, that was plenty for me and I was able to use that unit for quite a while, after the upgrade.

It really depends on how close to "state of the art" Popcorn wants to get. I got the impression, he did not require a cutting edge computer. If I am wrong, I am sorry.
I am just trying to throw out another possibility. As I said, I am not very computer savvy and I am probably getting in way over my head. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

heater451
05-24-2003, 10:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> I am not a fan of Dell support and definitely have a bad taste in my mouth. You bring up EMachines, I was wondering if you know if they have fixed their power supply problem. When I worked at a local computer store, we sent back (to emachines) an incredible % of sold computers. I do not recommend them at all unless this has been fixed.<hr /></blockquote>I am not aware of a power supply issue, but that's just lack of exposure (ignorance). The eMachines that I've seen and used are all 2 year and younger--yeah, I wouldn't endorse the early machines, but I'm not sure when the power supply problem was. .. .

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr>Another issue with buying a computer like Dell, Gateway, Emachines, Compaq etc is warranty work. You will have to ship your computer away to get it fixed if the need arises. Another issue that sometimes comes up is proprietary hardware. If you have a Dell and the power supply dies you cannot just go to Best Buy and get a power supply. You have to buy a Dell power supply.<hr /></blockquote>Basically, I agree, although I've mostly seen new, mass-produced computers only have problems with sloppy assembly--CD-ROM not plugged securely, for example. An exception was one eMachine I purchased for someone else, in which the floppy simply died, which I consider rare (I don't recall the manufacturer of the drive, but I know it was a standard--like "Mitsu", or something). On average, I believe that most PCs will outlast any warranty period, and then service can be handled by anyone.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg84:</font><hr>I still think the best bet is to buy a computer from a local builder. Most all of them offer a warranty and do all the work in house. I would compare prices between different ones and do a little homework before just buying the first one you come to, but other than that, I think the local ma and pa store is a good deal.

eg8r<hr /></blockquote>Sometimes, local shops have to charge a little more, due to the fact that they can't keep up w/ the large manufacturers, but I would agree that a local builder can be a good choice, pretty much for the same reasons you offer. Also, they may have a bare-bones special, that allows for an upgrade in performance, while keeping the old "feel" of the obsolete machine--no app reinstall required, and no OS change.



==========================

Popcorn
05-24-2003, 10:52 AM
Talked to Dell last night and they were pretty nice, no real sales pitch, just answered questions.they have some free upgrades and rebates. A free upgrade to a Pent. 4 from a celeron total price before shipping $414. I don't need a monotor, + $99. s/h and tax. Here is what they said I would be getting

GROUP: 1 QUANTITY: 1 SYSTEM PRICE: $564.00 GROUP TOTAL: $564.00

Base Unit:
Dimension 2350 Series, Intel Pentium 4 Processor NPFC,A/V 2.20GHz (462-1320)

Memory:
256MB DDR SDRAM at 266MHz (461-8524)

Keyboard:
Dell Quiet Key Keyboard (310-1582)

Monitor:
Video ready option w/o monitor (320-3000)

Video Card:
Integrated Intel 3D AGP Graphics (430-3900)

Hard Drive:
30GB Value Hard Drive (340-7399)

Floppy Disk Drive:
No Floppy Drive Requested (340-8688)

Operating System:
Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition,Service Pack 1,English (420-1921)

Operating System:
Dell Application Back-up CD, Factory Install (313-7222)

Operating System:
Dell Support 2.0 for Dimension 2350 (412-0309)

Mouse:
Dell 2-button Scroll Mouse (310-1871)

NIC:
Integrated 10/100 Ethernet (430-0441)

Modem:
56K PCI Telephony Modem for Windows (313-1314)

CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive:
48x/24x/48x CD-RW Drive (462-0278)

Sound Card:
Integrated ADI 1885 Audio (313-0847)

Speakers:
Harman Kardon HK-206 Speakers Midnight Grey (313-0954)

Bundled Software:
MS Worksuite 2003,CD with Documentation,OEM,US,English, Factory Install (412-0337)

Factory Installed Software:
NETWORK ASSOCIATES MCAFEE.COM OEM,ENGLISH,90 DAY TRIAL, FACTORY INSTALL (412-0326)

Feature
MusicMatch 7.1x Basic (412-0298)

Feature
Dell Picture Studio Image Expert Standard,Dimension (412-0271)

Feature
Dell Picture Studio Paint ShopPro Try and Buy,Dimension (412-0273)

Service:
Type 3- Third Party At Home Service, 24x7 Technical Support, Initial Year (950-7980)

Service:
No Warranty, Year 2 and 3 (950-9797)

Service:
1 Year Limited Warranty (950-3337)

Service:
Soft Contracts - Banctec (412-0360)

Dirline:
Express Tech Support, Must enter Express Service Code (foundon back of system) when calli ng for tech support, 1 Year. (902-7077)

Misc:
AOL 8.0 - Buddy ROM (412-0371)

Misc:
AOL 8.0 - DHS (412-0366)

Misc:
Real Network RealOne Player Basic,Version 6,US English (412-0380)


Informational Only - High Speed Internet Billed Seperately (462-0984)


$150 MAIL-IN REBATE! 40402 Redeem your rebate after purchase at dell4me.com/ rebates (462-1271)

heater451
05-24-2003, 11:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> . . .IIRC, I the upgraded a 386 up to boarder line pentium. At the time, that was plenty for me and I was able to use that unit for quite a while, after the upgrade.

It really depends on how close to "state of the art" Popcorn wants to get. I got the impression, he did not require a cutting edge computer. . . .<hr /></blockquote>The jump from a 386 to a Pentium is fairly large, and going to a PII or PIII is seriously better. But, I think going from a relatively high-end PIII to a P4 is hardly worth it.

Like you said, regarding "state of the art" and "cutting edge", Popcorn probably won't need a 2Ghz machine--besides, once CPU speeds passed about 1.4Ghz, they really started selling the numbers, as opposed to any real performance. That, and you will find with XP, and the base 128mb of RAM, it will often seem to run slow anyway.

Personally, I have several machines at home:

95 box--400Mhz Celeron, 128mb RAM
98 box--650Mhz PIII, 128mb RAM
NT4 box--1Ghz AMD, 256mb RAM (built for work, but wound up sitting)
XP Pro (just to run IIS)--400Mhz Celeron, 128mb RAM
98/2k dual boot, dual processor 533Mhz Celerons, 384mb RAM

It's a bit hard to follow, but here goes:

The 95 box was built in 1998, originally as a 266Mhz machine. I had the two Cel400s in the dual processor tower. When I swapped in the 533s, the 266 became a Cel400, and so did the NT4 machine, which later lost its HDD. I had been using the NT box for work, so I decided to upgrade and try the AMD. I wound up using the 2k box(dual Cel533s), and the NT machine mostly collects dust.

My wife (who has an mid-grad PIII laptop, and a P4, 1.5Ghz Sony VAIO running Me--soon to be XP), wanted to test some web stuff at home, so I built the XP machine with the Celeron 400 from the NT box. [XP users, if you ever get a "missing operating system", or "error loading operating system", double-check your boot.ini file--'nuther story. . . .too long for here.]

Okay, so the point of this, is that most of them are running older OSs, with a reasonable amount of RAM, and they are all fast enough. From my experience with some of the newer, "faster" CPUs, running XP and 128mb RAM, the older setups work just fine. And, since "fast enough" is a relative term, I will say that I could run Photoshop, Lotus Notes, and MS-Word concurrently on the NT/Cel400 package, and not feel that it was too slow (except for Notes--which is nicknamed "Slow-tus Notes").

Now, for qualification, I will say that there's a noticeable slowness, when opening files in the 100s of MB range--graphics, audio, and video. [BTW, all of them are running TNT2 graphics, except the 98/2k box, which has a GeForce3 ti500 in it, and the NT box, which had a Matrox G400 dual-head, but now runs a GeForceMX440 Twin-head] If I had to work with such large files everyday, I would still go for more RAM first--although, I do have the luxury of using the 1Ghz AMD--with or without more RAM. . . .

Again, I want to point out, and back up Rich R., that upgrading is often sufficient, and usually cost-efficient.

Of course, Popcorn also said that he "wanted" a "new computer", so that may be the source the decision.


~~forgot to mention that I work, game, and write this stuff on the 533s--although most apps don't even take advantage of the second processor.
===============================

heater451
05-24-2003, 11:44 AM
Sounds good!

For all my support of upgrading, I think that choosing a course and sticking with it is a large part of being satisfied, so "what's best" will work itself out!

I'm actually surprised at the price, but it looks like Dell has been successful enough to cut their prices. Or, perhaps the whole industry has dropped costs--whatever the reason, the package looks good.

Be aware, that the XP interface takes a little getting used to, and some things will appear "missing", but simply need to be turned on (Ex., the Quicklaunch bar will have to be enabled). Otherwise, you shouldn't have too much trouble figuring it out--and you can go back to the older, familiar interface if you want to instead.

BTW, if you won't be using the older machine, you can put the old hard drive in the new machine, and not have to transfer all your files. Of course, this won't allow the applications to work, but any photos, documents, or other personal files should be available.

You won't be able to changeover the RAM (the old ones are probably regular SDRAM Dimms, while the new are DDR).


========================

Popcorn
05-24-2003, 11:55 AM
It is an Aptiva E2N 266. I upgraded to 128 ram and to 350 from 266 that is about all I did. This computer has not given me any trouble since new. Except for an old Apple years ago, it is my first computer. I hope I am not spoiled by such a trouble free computer. I always hear friends telling horror stories about theirs, maybe I have been lucky. When the guy came over to put in the high speed he was surprised no hard drive problems or anything else for a five year old computer. I think he scared me a little that it may be a time bomb. My father told me when I was a kid, "Never buy something when you have to, or sell something, when you have to". That is how you get stuck, because you don't have time to make a good deal. He was always in the market for a new car, and would just bring home a car he got some great deal on. Then sell our car in his own good time getting a nice fair price for it. He even bought property the same way. I do the car thing myself. I have owned dozens of cars over the years. I feel like I have driven cars all these years for free, just rolling one car into the other with almost no loss. I have owned a few classic cars I have made money on. I bought a 65 Thunderbird sitting in a barn in Virginia for $200. My wife and I spent the day getting it to run. I brought it back to my mother-in-laws house who we were visiting and did a break job on it and drove it back to Florida. By the time we reached the Florida line it was really running nice, My wife was following me in our car and I blew her away. With that 390 in it, I had it at up to 120 going through Georgia. Anyway, I was not in the market to buy a car when I bought the Thunderbird, I had fun driving it for around two years and sold it for $3500. I have had a 64 ½, 65, 67, Mustangs, 65 Impala conv., 48 ford pickup, many Volkswagens, including a chopped microbus 60s style I don't remember what else. Kind of got off the subject a little but that is my theory of how to get a good deal, my fathers anyway.

bluewolf
05-24-2003, 12:23 PM
popcorn,

Regardless of which computer you choose, I really do think that you would enjoy a rewritable cd to store your pics on.

Laura

9 Ball Girl
05-24-2003, 01:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr> This sounds like a lot of junk, ie software on there that you dont need. Most companies do this to make it look like you are getting all of this awesome stuff. It is a sales gimic.

<font color="red">Of course there's software on there that you don't need. It's eyecandy for newbies. I just purchased one for my sister and uninstalled a whole bunch of crap that she doesn't need. Most of that software is free and some are trial versions, and the only thing you're paying for as far as software is concerned is the Bundled software i.e. WordPerfect, etc. What would a sale be without the gimmics?</font color>

This computer sounds over priced to me. By at least 200 dollars. This is dell's cheaper end stuff.Also, this rebate stuff is also a gimmic too. Many have rebates to make it look like you are getting a better deal than you are. From my experience, at least 60% of rebates never come back. If you are going dell, I would go midrange price and be careful about that limited warranty stuff and what that means. When I bought my gateway, the lower end computer had a worse warranty than the one I bought which was more expensive. Also, found out the monitor was not covered. I was niave. I was used to circuit city where every thing is covered if you buy extended service.

<font color="red">I've yet to see an unreturned rebate from a well known name brand computer purchase by people that I know--and I've been an IT Specialist for 12 years and I know a lot of people that've purchased computers with some sort of bargain attached to it. As far as it being overpriced, that's a damn good price compared to what I paid for mine back in '99. The specs that I listed were starting at $699 and I added stuff. You can start with one at $499 which I did for my sister and she wound up paying about $989 not including the printer and scanner that she wanted which brought the whole thing to about $1,200 which I think is still reasonable. Mine is a dinosaur now but because of the line of work that I'm in, I know how to upgrade to keep up with the times without getting lost. </font color>

eg8r
05-24-2003, 02:22 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Service:
Soft Contracts - Banctec (412-0360) <hr /></blockquote> I get chills everytime I see Banctec. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif They are the local onsite service company at Lockheed in Orlando. My computer was worse off everytime they touched it. They fixed the problem at hand but countless times I have proved they screwed something else up, or did not reinstall other items. It is sad that we had to "prove" they screwed up, but it kept a bill from being charged to our group.

I have no idea on a consumer level how they work but it seemed they would hire anyone that could breathe.

That price does not seem bad and the processor is a good upgrade from the Celeron. If you decide to do any intensive photo rendering you might want to add more RAM but the 256 will get you by. Like BW was saying earlier, this motherboard has the audio and video hardware integrated onto the board. They should be fine since you are not playing video games, however if you do want a better video card in the future you can disable the onboard card.

eg8r

eg8r
05-24-2003, 02:30 PM
[ QUOTE ]
It really depends on how close to "state of the art" Popcorn wants to get. I got the impression, he did not require a cutting edge computer. If I am wrong, I am sorry.
I am just trying to throw out another possibility. <hr /></blockquote> Nope you are not wrong. Since the new hardware has been coming out so quick, it is hard to get your hands on out-dated hardware. I am pretty sure he would have a hard time with just updating the processor without going to a lot of trouble hunting down one for his board. This option used to be a viable way to go, but you were also told "this computer will last you forever. " and then it was outdated in a year. Well these days a lot of times you are outdated in months.

eg8r