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nAz
05-26-2003, 07:31 PM
Has anyone heard of this or maybe played this game?
The price is $12.95 plus $4.95 shipping and handling.
Here are the rules I copied from thier website Poolcube (http://www.poolcube.com) :

POOL CUBE RULES:

Example: Cube 9-BallTM or Cube 8-BallTM:


The person who is breaking rolls or "shoots" the Cube from the head rail towards the foot rail. The Cube must tumble on its way down the table and go at least as far as the top of the rack in order to be a valid role. The number facing up is the "point" being played for that game. If the "Lose Your Break" side of the Cube turns up your opponent gets to break (and/or choose the game) instead. So, lets say that the number 4 rolls up. 4 becomes the point value of that game being played. The Cube is placed in the middle of the foot rail and the player breaks. At this stage, the Cube is neutral. This means that either player may challenge the other player to double the point value or wager. This can occur only at the beginning of an inning (other than the break). [An "inning" is the beginning of your shot when it is your turn to shoot]. If the breaking player fails to pocket a ball or scratches, the opposing player starts his/her inning and has the option to "double" the point value of the game. This is done by picking up the Cube with the 4 facing up, turning the Cube to the next number (8), and placing it on the right or left side of the foot rail. When the Cube is placed on the opposing players side of the foot rail, the Cube is tapped two or three times on the rail to draw attention to the fact that you are doubling the point value of the game (or the wager). The opposing player then has to make a decision whether to accept the challenge and play for double the points or concede the game and the original 4 points. The player whom accepts the doubling challenge then has "control" of the Pool CubeTM.

Except when the Cube is in the neutral position at the beginning of the game (the middle of the foot rail), doubling the Cube is always the option of the player "controlling" the Cube and can be done only at the beginning of an inning before he/she is about to shoot.

If the doubling challenge is accepted, the game continues at the new "point" value until the shooter runs out, misses, plays safe, or fouls. Once a player accepts a doubling challenge, he/she then has "control" of the Cube. The position/location of the Cube is on either the right or left side of the foot rail or at the bottom portion of the corresponding side rail which has been established as either player A or player B's side of the table. This means that only he/she may double the Cube next. Let's say that the Cube is doubled by player A and accepted by player B. Player B is now in control of the Cube and can prevent further doubling by player A as the game progresses. If player B finds himself or herself in a position where they think that they can run out and/or win, then Player B (at the beginning of the new inning) may challenge Player A with another double (this time to 16). Player A may concede the 8 points or accept the challenge and play for a new point value of 16. When either player succeeds in running out and/or winning the rack he/she wins the 16 points.

Any one rack can never exceed a value of 16 points. If a 16 is rolled before breaking, no doubling is allowed.

The match is designed to require a minimum of 4 racks, or as many racks as it takes to reach the desired race (to 30, 40, 50, 60, 100 points, or whatever).

Whoever wins the rack rolls the Cube for a new beginning point value, and breaks. The match is played as a race to 50 or 100 points (or a race to any number of points as you wish). There is no need to keep track of the number of racks played or racks won. Whoever accumulates the required number of total points first wins the match and/or rack. Points accumulated beyond the set match number do not count.



Single Game Play

Example: Cube 9-BallTM or Cube 8-BallTM on a per rack basis:


You can play single rack Cube 9-Ball or Cube 8-Ball by establishing a value for each point. Example: a point for a point, a penny a point, a dime a point, a dollar a point, ten dollars a point, one hundred dollars a point, etc. The Cube can either be rolled or "shot" to start the rack (which adds an element of chance to the amount being played for) or you can bypass rolling or "shooting" the Cube by establishing the amount being played for (by mutual agreement) by placing the Cube in the neutral position in the middle of the foot rail with the number of points being played for facing up. The game then begins for a wager that is the amount per point times the number on the Cube facing up. Example: At a dollar a point, if the Cube starts at the number 1, then you are playing for one dollar. If the Cube starts at the number 2, then you are playing for two dollars. If the Cube starts at 4, then you are playing or four dollars, etc., etc., etc.



Mix Cube 9-Ball and Cube 8-Ball in the same match:


Since the scoring mechanism is the same for any game (i.e. The Pool CubeTM), you can play a match where the person who is breaking gets to chose either 9-Ball or 8-Ball for that particular rack. This is a great way to play both games in the same match. You can use it as a form of strategy by forcing your opponent to play the game in which you may excel over him/her. The "Lose Your Break" feature on the initial roll of the Cube adds to the diversity and excitement of the match. It's actually quite funny when the "Lose Your Break" side of the Pool CubeTM comes up.

In mixed game play, the person breaking rolls the cube first, then chooses which game is to be played (8-ball or 9-ball).



Mix Cube Bank Pool & Cube One Pocket in the same match:


The same Pool CubeTM rules apply here as in Cube 8-BallTM or Cube 9-BallTM. However, since these games take longer you may want to play a race to a lower point total, like 30, 40, or 50.

In the case of a single game match of Cube Bank Pool or Cube One Pocket to 8 balls, you might want to start the Cube at 1 and establish a value to each point. Note: It still takes the required number of balls being played for (8) to win the game; however the amount being played for fluctuates with the doubling of the Cube should it occur

If you want to play really risky Cube Bank Pool or Cube One Pocket you can roll or "shoot" the Cube at the beginning of the match and play for whatever comes up. The "loose your break" rule can be applied or not as you choose by mutual agreement prior to starting the match.

NOTE:

When playing Cube 9-Ball, playing a race to 50 points is equivalent to a race to 5 or 7 racks. Playing to 100 points is equivalent to a race to 9 or 11.



Cube Straight Pool


The same Pool CubeTM rules apply here as well, but you might want to play a race to 30 or 40 points because straight pool is typically a much longer game. It may take one game to win a match or several depending on how many points you start out at.

In the case of a single game match of Cube Straight Pool to 100-150 balls, you might want to start the Cube at 1 and establish a value to each point. Note: It still takes the required number of balls being played for (100-150) to win the game; however the amount being played for fluctuates with the doubling of the Cube should it occur

If you want to play really risky Cube Straight Pool you can roll or "shoot" the Cube at the beginning of the match and play for whatever comes up. The "loose your break" rule can be applied or not as you choose by mutual agreement prior to starting the match.



TIPS on rolling or "shooting" the Pool CubeTM:


1. Leave the rack around the balls when rolling or "shooting" the Cube.
* * This way if the Cube hits the rack it won't break up your perfect rack.
2. The Cube must hit or pass the first ball spot and remain anywhere on the table
* * to be a valid point.
3. Cube rolls or Cube "shots" that go off the table, into the pocket, or leaners,
* * must be re-rolled to establish a valid point.
4. "Shooting" the Cube - Place the Cube behind the stringer line and hit it with a
* * cue stroke, sending it tumbling down the table.
5. "Spinning and Shooting" the Cube is accomplished by spinning the Cube on
* * its end and stroking it while spinning down to the other end of the table into
* * or past the front of the rack.
6. The Pool CubeTM must land on the table to be valid.
7. Sliding the Cube is illegal. It must tumble when rolled or "shot".
8. If you are playing without the "Lose Your Break" feature, just re-roll or re-shoot
* * when it comes up.


Lose Your Break Option:

If you don't like the "Lose Your Break" part of the game, you can bypass it by mutual agreement and just re-roll or re-shoot whenever it comes up on a roll or "shot".


Closing Time:

If your match is cut short by the Poll Hall or the Bar closing for the night, the match is considered a draw unless one player needs 10 or less points to win. In that event the person with only 10 points or less needed to win is declared the winner of the match. If both players need 10 or less points to win then the person nearest 100 (or whatever number of points you are playing for) is declared the winner.


ADDITIONAL RULES:

If you forget to roll the Cube before the break, the break becomes invalid and you must re-rack, re-roll the Cube and re-break.

Push shots:

In the event of a push, the Cube may be doubled if the opposing player takes the shot and the doubling occurs prior to his/her first shot. If the opposing player declines the push and lets the breaker continue, no doubling is allowed until the next inning?the Cube remains in the neutral position.

Tom_In_Cincy
05-26-2003, 09:06 PM
The Pool Cube was invented and is being promoted and marketed by a player here in Cincinnati.

I have played with this cube in a private match and also its been used in two tournaments here locally.

Inside Pool did an article about the first Pool Cube tournament in it in a recent post on its website.

Much like the doubling cube in the backgammon game.