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Karatemom
05-28-2003, 08:29 PM
What made you decide on the cue that you shoot with? I've got 2, a Lucasi and a McD, and to be honest, the only real difference I feel is the weight. I haven't shot long enough to notice any difference in feel, hit, etc. Is it just trial and error, plus a little experience, that makes you realize what you like and dislike about particular cues? And how much difference is there really between cues, besides looks?

Heide ~ trying to get a little deeper into this game

Rod
05-28-2003, 09:20 PM
Heide, good question.
First of all I have to say appearance. I don't like busy or gaudy cues. I'd just pay more without any playing benefits.
My cue (a Schön) felt pretty good balance wise when it was new. It was just a little to heavy. I removed weight until it felt right, about 1/2 oz. I'm not a fan of pro taper shafts and the Schön is more of a conical taper. I ordered 2- 13 1/4mm shafts to make it even stiffer. I liked the original Schön tips it gave me the feel I liked. ie the over-used word hit. I play with slightly different tips now (they still come from Schön). The mixture of the tip, shaft size and taper, weight and balance gives me the feel and control I like. Joint's make little difference to me feel wise but I do like a steel joint because it helps put the weight more forward. The only thing I would change if possible would be the butt diameter. That would only be about .020 larger with the same taper. Unfortunately that can't happen unless I custom order one. I like this cue a lot and have tweaked it to what feels good to me. That's why I play with this cue.

Rod

bluewolf
05-28-2003, 09:27 PM
Actually, I could use it as a weapon, but it is probably better for potting balls. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

No kidding, I will be serious. The most important things to me are tip diameter,I like 12.75, and balance. I like a mid balance cue rather than a backweighted one. I had weight taken out of the back of my preditor so that it would not be as backweighted and my blackheart is mid weighted, so they both suit me just fine. The blackheart is prettier, though. I also like a 18.5 weight cue.

Others who are more expereinced have more detailed specs but I am pretty basic. I do not even care what tip is on it. I have moori, talisman and water buffalo on my sticks (talisman on the one I dont use anymore) and I really could not tell the difference.

Laura

WesK
05-28-2003, 10:39 PM
Because, unlike Voodoo Steve, I can't just use my finger.

But seriously, I seem to flow back and forth between several of my cues. So I guess that it is all about trail and error.

At different times, I find that I shoot better with one cue or another and I'll just stick with it for a while.

wes

Kato
05-28-2003, 10:51 PM
I guess cause it's the one I own. When I get the Omen I'll be able to tell you better. My cue is fairly stiff which works for me because I've got a little too much stroke for a whippy cue.

Kato

HalSmith
05-29-2003, 03:39 AM
I was shooting with a Shon that has a real nice feel to it when you pick it up and a solid hit which I look for in a cue. The butt wasn't a big as other cues which made it feel real nice in your hand. I had a Olivier built because of the same reasons. His cues all have an excellent hit , the feel of it in your hand just feels right and the ivory and ebony just jumps out at you when you see it. Guess you can tell I love my cue.---Smitty

BillPorter
05-29-2003, 04:45 AM
My first concern is the feel/sound of the cue when it hits the cue ball. It has to be a solid hit with no "tinks," "clinks," rattles, etc. I bought several inexpensive cues on eBay over the past year and finally settled on one that had no weight bolt, was reasonably attractive, and used a Uni-lock joint. I bought a Predator shaft for the cue and sold all my other cues (Capone, Meucci, Predator 2K, Lucasi, and a couple of Quests). Of course now that I am down to just one cue, I am always looking around to buy another one! Really, any cue that's straight, about 19 oz., shaft between 12.5 and 13.25, and that doesn't sound or feel funny at impact suits me just fine.

Predator314
05-29-2003, 06:05 AM
I shot with a Helmstetter (w/ Predator shaft) for about 1.5 years. I was fooling around one day and my buddy let me shoot with his Predator 2. It was too sweet. It is the best feeling cue (IMO) that I have played with. I was looking at a buying a new Schon at the time. When I used the Predator 2, I was sold on it. Looks be damned. It's a plain jane cue that hits great.

Fred Agnir
05-29-2003, 07:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Karatemom:</font><hr> What made you decide on the cue that you shoot with? <hr /></blockquote>Usually, when I post to this question, I end up making sales for Schuler. I get no commission. Damn them.

At this point, I own 12 or so cues. I shoot with a Ray Schuler. I used to shoot with Meuccis, but have shot with all the large volume production cue. When I was looking for the next cue, I was looking for a cue that really reduced the vibration and sound from the joint. That is, I was looking for a professionally balanced cue with a one-piece feel. This isn't the hit for everyone, but a lot of people don't realize that there are cues out there that hit like this. I annoyed a lot of local players by asking them if I could hit a few with their cues. That would include, but wasn't limited to, Helmstetter, Schön, Joss, Samsara, JPechauer, Scruggs, Padgett, Southwest,Black, you name it. Of these cues, I'll tell you now that the Schön and then the Joss Ltd. had the least "ting" to them, even though they both have SS joints.

Anyway, I was playing against a guy in a biggish tournament and couldn't help but notice that I couldn't "hear" his cue. It was a Schuler. I asked to hit with it, and immediately fell in love. The hit is muted, with very limited vibration. At different speeds and english, the feel of the cue didn't change noticeably. That is, there wasn't an annoying speed. Some cues, depending on the speed of stroke and the english applied will sing a very bad note. I think everyone has heard it in their cues. Not with the Schuler.

Why not? Ray engineered the joint with specific intention to reduce that vibration. It's a relatively long pilot that is an interference fit (radial compression) with the butt joint. So, there's more intimate contact than standard joints. And because of the pilot and interference, the flat faces don't have the ability to separate during an off-center hit (which I theorize contributes to the vibration feeling in other cues). Because the design in the joint is the screw and fit, the joint collar is completely aesthetic. So, more options are available without compromising the "hit." Cocobolo collars can be done without fear of structural issues. Or an SS joint is available, without the "ting" sometimes associated with it.

One of the best things about Schuler cues is that the shafts are completely interchangeable with any Schuler butt. They were one of the, if not *the* first cue company to offer this. From his first to the company's current, any Schuler shaft fits any Schuler butt. The collar rings have a slight radius to them such that when they're screwed together, there is a slight "reveal" line that makes any mismatch imperceptible. That's a common assembly technique found in many consumer goods. Most noticeably, and plastic phone. There's a "gap" between the two halves so that the line-to-line mismatch isn't noticeable.

Schuler has a standard line of shafts. Eight or so standard tapers. Each shaft is weighted and marked. So, you can pseudo-"customize" your cue as far as shaft tapers and weights go without suffering the cuemaker time often associated with ... custom work. And, to make things better, Schuler offers used and reconditioned shafts (usually from people who tried one style of shaft and traded it in for another style) that play just as good as a new shaft, for considerably less money than a new shaft. And, they're guaranteed to fit.

Recently, I had a Schuler Pro shaft, and I wanted to trade it for a Professional Shaft. Someone in cyber space had the Professional and wanted the Schuler Pro. We swapped without any fear of mismatches or misfits. Can anyone else say the same with their cue?

Anyway, that's it in a nutshell... big nutshell.

http://www.schulercue.com

Fred &lt;~~~ proud owner of three Schuler cues, long before he ever heard of a Fast Larry

P.S.: two other cues come to mind as far as "muted" or "low vibration" : Lambros w/Ultra Joint and the Layani Cue (with conical joint). Both of these cuemakers put a lot of effort into reducing that vibration. They're on the list, with the Layani already on its way.

Ralph S.
05-29-2003, 07:18 AM
I just dont know what we would do without having your wisdom and investigative tendencies at our disposal Fred. You always seem to post interesting things. As far as the "tinging" sound when you "hit" the cb, I haven't noticed any with my Jacoby. Also, have you hit any with a Blackheart? I am having one made and ordered it because of nothing but good things I have heard about his cues.

Fred Agnir
05-29-2003, 07:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ralph S.:</font><hr> I just dont know what we would do without having your wisdom and investigative tendencies at our disposal Fred. You always seem to post interesting things. As far as the "tinging" sound when you "hit" the cb, I haven't noticed any with my Jacoby. Also, have you hit any with a Blackheart? I am having one made and ordered it because of nothing but good things I have heard about his cues. <hr /></blockquote>I have shot with a few Jacobies, but not a Blackheart. The Jacoby hits great, but there is definitely more vibration in it compared to a Schuler. Unless Jerry does something to his joint that I don't know about, I've assumed that the Blackheart wouldn't be any different. That is not meant in any way shape or form disrespect for either the Jacobies or to Jerry. But the Schuler, Lambros Ultra, and the Layani joint designs specifically address the vibration and the transfer of energy through the joint, which is why those three joints don't look like any of the other common joints.

On a side note, not meaning anyone specific, I wonder about people who say things like "it's the sweetest hitting cue" or some such nonsense. How many cues have they played with? Me personally, I've hit with hundreds (thousands?) of cues, dozens of custom cue brands, dozens of production cue brands, snooker cues, carom cues, just to find out what I like and don't like. And I'm sure of the 400+ cuemakers out there, my list barely scratches what's available. When I knew nothing of cues, every new cue felt like the greatest cue in the world, until the next cue. Best to say, "I like it," and why. IMO, of course.

Fred &lt;~~~ doesn't know what the sweetest hit is.

Yuppie
05-29-2003, 07:45 AM
I also shoot with a Jacoby. I play with it because it hits really solid without the noticable ting or added vibration which is also a quality I looked long and hard for in a cue. I was considering a buying a Schuler as well for the very same reason. The joint on those cues are amazing. They actually get tighter as you screw the ends together. In a regular cue joint, you just twist until the ends meet.

I decided on the Jacoby because I felt that their was more of a personal feel with the cuemakers. The hit is like I wanted and shafts are a little less expensive than a Schuler and you can have them tapered the way you want.

9 Ball Girl
05-29-2003, 08:02 AM
For me, it's like Kato said, 'cause it's the one I own. I shoot with a Viking K11 19oz and the tip is 13mm. Because I've only consistently shot with this cue, I'm not that experienced in breaking down the this and that of cues. However, I do notice a difference when I shoot with someone else's cue as far as weight, hit, and feel vs. my cue. But then I'll adjust. Sometimes on Thursdays when I help run the tourneys I'll play with some of the players as they warm up and I'll use a house cue to play because I don't have my cues and I know what to look for in a house cue so that it can closely imitate the feel of my cue (I'd say I've only found 1 out of 100 times!)

But to tell you the truth, you can give me any cue with a 12.5-13mm tip and I'll be able to shoot fine. I don't care what it looks like, how clean it is, how many dings on it, I'll be able to shoot. I have a friend who has an eye for designs on cues, he's got Benders, Southwests, and he's currently waiting for his Capone break cue, and he can't figure out how I can just pick up anything to shoot with without looking at the design on the cue. Oh well. My cue has a leopard lady on it and I picked that only because I love wild animals.

05-29-2003, 08:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Yuppie:</font><hr> I also shoot with a Jacoby. I play with it because it hits really solid without the noticable ting or added vibration which is also a quality I looked long and hard for in a cue. I was considering a buying a Schuler as well for the very same reason. The joint on those cues are amazing. They actually get tighter as you screw the ends together. In a regular cue joint, you just twist until the ends meet.

I decided on the Jacoby because I felt that their was more of a personal feel with the cuemakers. The hit is like I wanted and shafts are a little less expensive than a Schuler and you can have them tapered the way you want. <hr /></blockquote>
<font color="blue">
I also shoot with a Jacoby and love the hit. The balance is what really makes the cue for me. Everytime you shoot it feels like you're hitting off the rails. I haven't noticed any noises but will have to keep my ears open.
</font color>

bluewolf
05-29-2003, 08:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ralph S.:</font><hr> As far as the "tinging" sound when you "hit" the cb, I haven't noticed any with my Jacoby. Also, have you hit any with a Blackheart? I am having one made and ordered it because of nothing but good things I have heard about his cues. <hr /></blockquote>

Good solid hit.

Laura

Aboo
05-29-2003, 08:53 AM
Again, because it's the one I own /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif I shoot with a McDermott. I bought it because I hate the linen wraps and it had a really nice leather wrap. I shot with it for 2 hours and enjoyed the balance as well.
I don't have 1000's of bucks to spend on a cue. I bought a nice, quality, used cue for what I could afford.

Like 9BG up there, I play with a lot of house cues too and played in tourny's with them for a long time before I bought this cue. As long as the tip is the right diameter and shape, I'm good. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
05-29-2003, 09:21 AM
I tried about a dozen different cues during my initial search for a cue. I tried several Meucci's, that being the cue of choice in the Hamiltucky APA league. I tried an Adam, a Helmstetter, a Viking, a Dale Perry, a Pechaur, a Stealth, and others. A local hall rents McDermotts and the first time I played with one I really liked it. It seemed to have a solid hit but also with the pro taper that I wanted (Sorry Fred, no scientific explanation is forthcoming. All I know is the balls went in the holes really easily). I ordered one with a stainless steel collar (for aesthetics) and I have played with it now for 4 years.

I recently bought another McD (the Prestige II factory second) from Ed Mercier at playpool.com. It plays about the same as my original.

Qtec
05-29-2003, 09:27 AM
I used to sell cues,this is my advice.First of all,decide how much you want to spend.Check out cues in your price range.If you already have a cue,you should already know what kind of wieght,tip size and how long it shoud be.Look for quality,as the the man said,every piece of decoration thats on it ,you have to pay for.Never buy a cue because it looks good.Check the balance,i recommend forward wieghted ,if it it feels good,test it.Check for striaghtness by looking down the shaft,dont roll it on the table.Hit a few balls,never buy a cue that you cant try out.Listen to the sound it makes.It has to sound right eg,if you hear a tinny sound, something is probably wrong.Make your own mind up.Once you have bought it,you now have to learn to play with it.I would recommend that that you give your old cue to friend or sell it.Dont switch between cues.,give your new cue a chance.Buying a good cue wont make you better,but if you learn to use it properly,it might.Good luck,Qtec

Fred Agnir
05-29-2003, 09:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> Never buy a cue because it looks good.<hr /></blockquote>

I think I know what you mean, but surely looks should be a contributing factor to the final decision.

Fred

Wally_in_Cincy
05-29-2003, 09:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr>


Why not? Ray engineered the joint with specific intention to reduce that vibration. It's a relatively long pilot that is an interference fit (radial compression) with the butt joint. .... <hr /></blockquote>

Do any other cuemakers use an interference joint that you know of.

Qtec
05-29-2003, 11:54 AM
Only if i wanted to hang it on my wall Fred.

Fred Agnir
05-29-2003, 12:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>

Do any other cuemakers use an interference joint that you know of. <hr /></blockquote>I don't know. I don't recall hearing of anyone else.

Fred

Wally_in_Cincy
05-29-2003, 12:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>

Do any other cuemakers use an interference joint that you know of. <hr /></blockquote>I don't know. I don't recall hearing of anyone else.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

The reason I asked is this. My girlfriend's Pechauer screws together with a definite interference. I thought it was defective when I first tried it 3 or 4 years ago. She said it is meant to be that way for a better hit.

I'll email Pechauer I guess. Just to satisfy my curiousity.

Fred Agnir
05-29-2003, 12:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
The reason I asked is this. My girlfriend's Pechauer screws together with a definite interference. <hr /></blockquote>That doesn't sound right. Certainly not for the steel pin into brass insert.

Fred

Rod
05-29-2003, 01:27 PM
My Schön had interference when it was new. Now after many years only two of the shafts get a little snug before the shaft seats. Either way I don't notice any difference in the feel or any tinks. I have an old Palmer that definately has some tinks. The problem there is a very large Aluminum weight screw 1/2" in diameter. I can add a steel screw to the aluminum screw before it goes in the cue. That really doesn't cause the tink or hollow sound. What causes it is the deep bore past the length of the screw. I played with that cue over 20 years, it felt great. Could do anything with whitey. To play with it now however with the odd sound it is obviously sub par. It still hits solid, I just can't get past the sound.

~~~ rod knows tinks

Wally_in_Cincy
05-29-2003, 01:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
The reason I asked is this. My girlfriend's Pechauer screws together with a definite interference. <hr /></blockquote>That doesn't sound right. Certainly not for the steel pin into brass insert.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

I'm pretty sure it's metal into wood like my McD. I'll check and report back tomorrow.

UWPoolGod
05-29-2003, 01:39 PM
Because it has paid for itself 10+ times over. Good enough reason not to change.

Karatemom
05-29-2003, 02:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> On a side note, not meaning anyone specific, I wonder about people who say things like "it's the sweetest hitting cue" or some such nonsense. How many cues have they played with? Me personally, I've hit with hundreds (thousands?) of cues, dozens of custom cue brands, dozens of production cue brands, snooker cues, carom cues, just to find out what I like and don't like. And I'm sure of the 400+ cuemakers out there, my list barely scratches what's available. When I knew nothing of cues, every new cue felt like the greatest cue in the world, until the next cue. Best to say, "I like it," and why. IMO, of course.

Fred &lt;~~~ doesn't know what the sweetest hit is. <hr /></blockquote> You always seem to know exactly what I'm trying to get at, Fred. It is probably impossible to find the "perfect" cue for you unless you've tried them all. But even then, doesn't the tip, shaft size, etc., change certain aspects? Then you'd have to try all the tips, sizes of shafts, and everything else that changes the condition of a cue. You'd have to find the right variables to make your cue perfect. There seems to be thousands of different things that can make your cue fit you for the better or worse. It's trying to find the right one that seems so difficult, especially if you're a newbie to the game.

Heide

dg-in-centralpa
05-29-2003, 07:12 PM
For several years I shot with a low end mid 70's Palmer. Then I switched to a low end Meucci. That shaft has so much vibration, I hated it. Then I read about Predators and tried one at Valley Forge. It was love at first sight. I finally found the hit I was looking for with no vibes. I saved my money and bought a mid range predator the following year. Then I started saving for a custom which I eventually got. I bought a Richard Black. I was told and read that this is the closest you can get to a Balabushka without the high price. I also have an older Schon that I like but don't use. Some guy needed money so I bought it. It plays nice, looks nice, and has lots of ivory.

DG - who'll someday own a real Balabushka

Fred Agnir
05-30-2003, 06:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Karatemom:</font><hr> It is probably impossible to find the "perfect" cue for you unless you've tried them all. But even then, doesn't the tip, shaft size, etc., change certain aspects? Then you'd have to try all the tips, sizes of shafts, and everything else that changes the condition of a cue. You'd have to find the right variables to make your cue perfect. There seems to be thousands of different things that can make your cue fit you for the better or worse. It's trying to find the right one that seems so difficult, especially if you're a newbie to the game.<hr /></blockquote>Yup. That's why in ten or twenty years down the road, you'll know many things that you do and don't like, that you might not know or think about now. And then, you could be a cue junky or cue junky wannabe.

Tell me. When you shoot with Chris' cue compared to yours, do they simply feel the same, or can you sense the differences even if you can't put your finger on them?

Fred &lt;~~~ if Chris lets you touch the Southwest, that is

Wally_in_Cincy
05-30-2003, 07:05 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
The reason I asked is this. My girlfriend's Pechauer screws together with a definite interference. <hr /></blockquote>That doesn't sound right. Certainly not for the steel pin into brass insert.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> It's a 3/8-10 stainless pin into wood. Looks quite similar to the classic McDermott joint.</font color>

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> My Schön had interference when it was new. Now after many years only two of the shafts get a little snug before the shaft seats. <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue">When I screwed the Pechauer together last night I noticed the interference is not nearly as pronounced as it used to be. Mostly right before it seats, like Rod's. It's been screwed and unscrewed about 600 or 700 times I would say. </font color>

Popcorn
05-30-2003, 08:37 AM
I believe the original reason behind the Schuler joint, was to be able to produce shafts that were not unique to one cue. They are built off the center line of the cue, I would assume on a mandrel. I would say this is also the reason there is no design in the shaft collars so they can be put on any Schuler cue. Most cues have the shafts fitted to the butt making it impossible to interchange them from cue to cue. The screw does not even have to be centered to make the shaft fit correctly as long as the outside of the cue is concentric. Having said that, the Schuler cue joint is somewhat weak. The only thing holding a cue together that uses an insert, no matter how the joint is designed, are the OD threads of the insert in the shaft. This is the weakest link, and on a Schuler, they are somewhat fine machine threads that, can strip out under stress, and actually they often do. Schulers have a high rate of needed joint repairs. I play in a place where billiards is everything, they have four Verhoven tables and there must be a hundred Schulers in there. Almost all have been sent back for either joint repairs or because they developed mysterious noises. A Schuler joint does, by it's design, have extra stability. You can't hold it up to a light and with a little force open a gap in the joint, like you can in many cues. But the tight fit when you screw it together, gives a false impression it is in some way, a stronger joint, it is not. Again, it is, only held together by the fine OD machine threads of the insert. The principle behind the Schuler joint is fine, I just have a problem with its actual construction.

Fred Agnir
05-30-2003, 08:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Having said that, the Schuler cue joint is somewhat weak. The only thing holding a cue together that uses an insert, no matter how the joint is designed, are the OD threads of the insert in the shaft. This is the weakest link, and on a Schuler, they are somewhat fine machine threads that, can strip out under stress, and actually they often do.<hr /></blockquote>

Either I don't understand what you're saying, or I don't understand your reasoning. Fine threads by design are stronger in torque and tension.

Or are you talking about the internal threads of the insert, which are 5/16-14, not a fine thread but a coarse thread? I can definitely see someone brute forcing the aluminum threads to failure. Are you talking about the weaker aluminum material?

[ QUOTE ]
But the tight fit when you screw it together, gives a false impression it is in some way, a stronger joint, <hr /></blockquote>In no way do I think the joint is "stronger." I do think it's strength/weight ratio is one of if not *the* highest. And that, I'm sure, is what Ray Schuler was looking for in a design. And he succeeded.

In any event, your warning is excellent advice to any would-be Schuler owner. Don't overtighten the joint. It's design specifically makes it such that you don't have to overtighten it, plus, it can't handle overtightening. That holds true for most joints anyway.

Fred

Karatemom
05-30-2003, 10:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> Tell me. When you shoot with Chris' cue compared to yours, do they simply feel the same, or can you sense the differences even if you can't put your finger on them?

Fred &lt;~~~ if Chris lets you touch the Southwest, that is <hr /></blockquote>HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! I can't remember the last time he let me even look at the cue much less touch it /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif. Seriously, when I shoot with his, I notice that the shaft is thinner, the weight is a bit more balanced toward the front of the cue, and the shaft and wrap are a bit smoother than mine. Very material at this point. Unless I'm sensing differences subconsciously, I don't notice much else, LOL.

Heide ~ hopes to own many, many cues in the future

Popcorn
05-30-2003, 11:17 AM
http://www.imgmag.org/images/popcorn321/schulerinsert3.JPG
Image won't appear so you must copy and paste

Here is a side by side comparison of two inserts. One is a Schuler the other is a common used insert. The Schuler is a 7/16 x 20 thread the other is a 7/16 x 14 thread. If it were being set into steel it would not matter that much and the finer thread would possibly be better depending on the application. But for wood the fine thread is not good. It is not good to cut or tap such a fine threads into a material like wood that can crumbles and it does. The tight fit of the Schuler joint rips out the inserts sometimes. I have seen some where it took two people to get the cue apart, were it not for the epoxy, I bet they all would break. There is a place that makes an improved copy of the Schuler insert for the cuemaker that would like to try the Schuler type of joint.
http://www.ctcueparts.com/productshaft.htm item 1414A38. By the way, the insert in the scan is one of about fifty I have in a drawer salvaged from striped out Schulers

Voodoo Daddy
05-30-2003, 11:36 AM
I sold "ALL" my cues in February so I cant say why I shoot with anything. I just use my finger...ask Wendy!! Cueless for the first time since 1979.

Kato
05-30-2003, 01:28 PM
Hey Steve, I got a Predator you can borrow. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Kato~~~knows about Big Steve's taste in cues.

PS. Big Jim could make you a cue. You know his cues are monsters

Rod
05-30-2003, 07:35 PM
Interesting, I certainly agree, fine thread and wood don't mix well. Even a material such as aluminum is better off with a few less threads. Either way better have good sharp taps.

Popcorn
05-30-2003, 09:22 PM
When you cut inside and outside threading, as with an insert, you can end up with no wall left when the threading is course and the piece is small. In this case, you have 5/16 x 14 inside threading. Since it is aluminum, to cut a 14 thread on the 7/16 outside, may weaken the aluminum. He solved the problem by cutting a finer thread on the OD, I can't think of any other reason he would do it. They would be better off going to a 1/2 inch OD aluminum insert, or use a strong lite material like titanium. Cost does not matter, the cost is passed on to the customer and you are building the best product you can. When you would talk to Ray, he talked to you like you were a school girl and knew nothing about a cues construction, everything was a lecture and a lot of BS. A lot of people today know a lot about cues, you read it here on this board. People have lathes and have taken cues apart and they have an understanding of cues and cue construction. The cuemakers can't talk down to them that much any more with a lot of mumbo-jumbo, many players know when it's BS.

05-30-2003, 09:34 PM
well, i shoot with my cue because of a few reasons, at the time i purchased my cue, their were only a selected few good cue's around, i dont like the way Mcdermott feels, vikings feel like a twig on a tree to me, and the rest just did'nt do it, now as for my meucci i shot with atleast 10 different meucci's, to meucci has a solid hit and feel. theirs no defelection, vibration i feel every bit of the hit and stroke, besides that it looks good to me.