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06-03-2003, 10:28 AM
Since I've started playing again over the last few weeks, I'm feeling that the grip on my cue and my stroke are a bit flawed. And was looking for a little input.

A. I have a tendency to grip the cue with my thumb, index, and middle fingers, with the ring hanging loose and the pinky not touching at all. I think this is my first problem and that perhaps I should be holding the cue with all 5 fingers, correct?

B. Second issue is how you should hold and work your wrist during your stroke. I'm inclined to believe that your wrist should stay at 180 degree angle with the rest of your forearm, and that you should keep your wrist loose and allow it to move with the cue like a hinge. However, during the stroke the movement allowed of the wrist should be forwards/backwards and not towards/away from your body (which would change that 180 degree angle).

Muchos Gracias
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tateuts
06-03-2003, 11:27 AM
Sounds like your right hand grip is fine with the exception of your ring finger. I like mine on the handle and it gives a little more support on harder hit shots.

The grip should be light between the fingers and the thumb and definitely relaxed. I don't put all five fingers on the cue but I don't think it would matter if I did as long as the handle is gently cradled in my fingers. The wrist is not stiff (on most shots)and should actually be relaxed enough to just react to the arm's movement.

If you want to see how solid your stroke is, set up some longish straight-in shots (cue ball traveling about 3 feet, object ball traveling about 4 feet) and hit the shot hard enough to draw the cue ball straight back. If the object ball is consistently pocketed, and the cue ball comes straight back to you, that's a good solid stroke.

If you're planning on hitting the cue ball pretty hard, like in the scenario above, it sometimes helps to firm up the grip in the practice strokes. This helps to eliminate "grabbing" with the right hand during a shot that requires speed.

It takes a lot longer than you might think to get back in competitive stroke after a very long layoff. There's a lot that's forgotten along the way. It took me about six months to get back to 100% after a layoff of many years.

Regards,

Chris

Rod
06-03-2003, 11:44 AM
[ QUOTE ]
A. I have a tendency to grip the cue with my thumb, index, and middle fingers, with the ring hanging loose and the pinky not touching at all. I think this is my first problem and that perhaps I should be holding the cue with all 5 fingers, correct?
<hr /></blockquote>

Your grip sounds fine. It is preference, some may hold with all 5 and others with the center and ring finger. Several combinations really. Generally the more fingers you add cuts down on wrist movement. Most important is grip pressure, it shoud be light. Another element is keep your pressure consistant throught the stroke. Don't start out light then increase on the forward stroke.

[ QUOTE ]
B. Second issue is how you should hold and work your wrist during your stroke. I'm inclined to believe that your wrist should stay at 180 degree angle with the rest of your forearm, and that you should keep your wrist loose and allow it to move with the cue like a hinge. However, during the stroke the movement allowed of the wrist should be forwards/backwards and not towards/away from your body (which would change that 180 degree angle).
<hr /></blockquote>

Your last comment is correct, however I would not describe the wrist as loose. It just sounds a little sloppy to me. Connected as a hinge front to rear is correct. The wrist hinges as a direct result from your lower arm swinging a weight. Moving it independent is a wristy move that gets sloppy and cause problems.

One added note, you do not have to have wrist movement in a pool stroke. There are many fine players that do not. Personally I use my wrist, it just feels more fluid to me. With no wrist I feel like I'm sawing a log or something.

Rod

GreenLion
06-04-2003, 10:16 AM
Sometimes after not shooting for awhile your shooting arm muscles get weaker then what they were and your elbow starts dipping during the shot which cuases error.When your practicing if you miss a shot go to the rail and practice delivering a strieght stroke that stays on that line that separates the wood and the cloth on the rail.When your doing that concentrate on keeping your elbow motionless with only your lower arm moving back and forth.Do it about 10 times so that when you miss a shot you ingrain the right stroke 10 times.I started doing this about 2 weeks or so ago after having problems with my elbow dipping and the results from this are incredable.My elbow does not want to dip most of the time now.Theres also a pop bottle drill you could do,Get a 8oz pop bottle and stroke in and out of the neck without touching the sides of the opening.It also works very good.

Fred Agnir
06-04-2003, 11:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote GreenLion:</font><hr> ,Get a 8oz pop bottle and stroke in and out of the neck without touching the sides of the opening.It also works very good.<hr /></blockquote>This has been advised for a long time, but I gotta ask: does anyone actually do this? How exactly is stroking into a bottle in any way shape or form representative of how you would normally stroke a shot? Because of natural follow through, wouldn't the tip either hit the bottle (high, low, or through), or are we saying to only do a warm up stroke into the mouth of the bottle?

Any what's an 8 oz. pop bottle?

Fred