PDA

View Full Version : wood lathe



Terry
06-05-2003, 07:09 AM
I due my own tips, the nearest tip man that I know of is almost three hours from me. I would like to have a inexpensive lathe to do a better job. Can a wood lathe be easily converted into a lathe suitable for doing tips? Thanks, Terry

heater451
06-05-2003, 09:06 AM
If you do, I would suggest that you get a scroll chuck. Or, you may have to hav an adapter made for a scroll chuck. This is to aid in self-centering and it's would be easier to get equal grip pressure on a joint adapter, or the end of the shaft. (BTW, the crutch-tip tool, like Spiderman made would work out well in the chuck.)

I've used an independently adjusted 4-jaw chuck on my wood lathe, but the adapter pin slips sometimes. I've toyed with the idea of grinding flats on the adapter pin, but I find it easier to just mount it on a stationary hand drill.

Also, I've seen a local guy use a pillow-block bearing, and masking tape on the cue shaft, to support the 'free' end of the shaft.--I can't remember if he put a strip of leather in the inner race of the bearing or not. . . .

I've made do with a rest, consisting of a correctly sized support and just folded a towel to lay upon it. I try not to turn with this too long, at one time, due to the friction. This "loose" setup takes a little bit of dexterity. If a tip glues off-center, then you have to sand it down, as opposed to being able to use a tool, because one hand has to be used to hold the shaft on the towel.

Anyway, I've only done a handful of tips--on my own cues,and one for a friend's break stick. They turned out okay. Of course, I don't have a jeweler's loupe to check the fit, but I haven't had one pop-off yet (superglue gel for adhesive). I haven't done any layered tips.

I know it seems 'wonky', but sometimes you gotta make do with what you have. . . .



~~still accepting donations for precision equipment.
~~might be asking everyone to send $1 soon. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif
=======================

Terry
06-06-2003, 07:18 AM
Hi Heater, Thanks for the info. Terry

heater451
06-06-2003, 10:10 AM
np (no problem)

BTW, I realized that many people probably don't know what a pillow block bearing is.

Here's a link to a site with a picture: http://www.bark-king.com/bearings.html



=============================

Terry
06-06-2003, 11:46 AM
Hi Heater, I didn't know it was called a pillow block. I knew what you were talking about though, I see them at work all the time only on a bigger scale. I'm thinking the drive on one end of the lathe with some sort of adapter and chuck to hold the threaded part of my shaft and a steady bearring ( pillow block ) on the other end. I should be able to make up some sleeves to go between my shaft and the bearring. Thanks once again. Terry

Fred Agnir
06-06-2003, 01:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Terry:</font><hr> Hi Heater, I didn't know it was called a pillow block. I knew what you were talking about though, I see them at work all the time only on a bigger scale. I'm thinking the drive on one end of the lathe with some sort of adapter and chuck to hold the threaded part of my shaft and a steady bearring ( pillow block ) on the other end. I should be able to make up some sleeves to go between my shaft and the bearring. Thanks once again. Terry <hr /></blockquote>For the threaded end, you really should have the world famous Spiderman Chuck.

One of these days, I'll take a picture of my setup at home. Roller bearings, plywood, hole saw, epoxy, time...

Fred

TonyM
06-06-2003, 01:21 PM
A wood lathe is better for cleaning or polishing shafts, or for doing wraps. It is not really suitable for doing tips.

A metal lathe is far more suitable.
Tony

heater451
06-06-2003, 03:12 PM
I briefly mentioned the tool in my first post, but since Fred brought back it up, I went searching for these:

http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccbboard&amp;Number=56646&amp; page=&amp;view=&amp;sb=&amp;o=

http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=61303&amp;page= &amp;view=&amp;sb=&amp;o=



========================

Rod
06-06-2003, 04:09 PM
Someone makes a tapered split nylon bushing to fit inside a pillow block bearing to center the shaft. I seen them on a small cue repair lathe. I don't remember who made the lathe. I wonder what one would search for to find the bushings? Perhaps they are made by the company that sells the lathe. That seems to be would be an easy way to go. Anyone with any ideas on this.

Rod

heater451
06-06-2003, 04:42 PM
It's not one of the Unique (http://www.uniqueinc.com/) lathes is it?

I wouldn't think it would be too hard to make something if you already have a small metal lathe, or to have one made.

I tried drawing out some similar stuff, originally inspired by an old book, which had a type of jig/chuck, for holding the outside of a round project. It was basically a wooden collet--bullet shaped and bored through the centerline, and then with slits placed perpendicular to each other, partially down the piece (like cutting an "dumb-dumb" bullet, starting with a '+' on the nose, and traveling down into the bullet). The grip was adjusted by a metal ring, which slid from the nose, along the taper of the bullet shape.

If I find the book that it's in, I'll try to get some more info (or a picture).



===================

Rod
06-06-2003, 05:24 PM
I believe it was a unique lathe. I guess the thing to do is call or send an email to see if they can be bought sperate.

Rod

hadenball
06-07-2003, 09:15 AM
Terry,

I did my repairs on a woodlathe for years and I made a steady rest with in-line skate wheels. Just make it so you can lay the cue on top of it, you'll have to hold it with one hand and use a razor knife to trim the tip. you can also order collets from www.cuesmith.com (http://www.cuesmith.com) , you may need to tell him the outside diameter of the collet for it to fit the pillow block.Chris Hightower makes the cuesmith lathe and he also helps people convert woodlathes to cue lathes. haden

heater451
06-07-2003, 05:34 PM
I've considered in-line skate wheels for a rest setup. . . .

Are you running two, or three, with a tensioner or something?



==================

Terry
06-07-2003, 07:57 PM
Hi Fred, A picture of your setup would be welcome. Terry

Terry
06-07-2003, 08:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> Someone makes a tapered split nylon bushing to fit inside a pillow block bearing to center the shaft. I seen them on a small cue repair lathe. Rod <hr /></blockquote> Hi Rod, if you find out any more on that nylon bushing, let a fellow know. I like the pillow block idea. Thanks, Terry

Terry
06-07-2003, 08:06 PM
Hi Haden, any pictures of your setup, Thanks, Terry

hadenball
06-08-2003, 03:18 AM
I ran two at first,then went to three but it was harder to have access to the tip. I liked it better with two but you have to keep your hand on the shaft.Then for polishing the shaft use a live cup center for the tailstock and you dont' have to hold it. haden

Fred Agnir
06-08-2003, 06:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Terry:</font><hr> Hi Fred, A picture of your setup would be welcome. Terry <hr /></blockquote>Here's a start:

http://home.earthlink.net/~ohagnir/_images/MVC-051S.JPG
http://home.earthlink.net/~ohagnir/_images/MVC-050S.JPG
http://home.earthlink.net/~ohagnir/_images/MVC-048S.JPG

Of course, this a metal lathe which allows me to make those bushing/collet pieces as well as a bunch of other precision turning. I don't have a picture of one of my steady rests due to my laziness.

Fred

heater451
06-08-2003, 10:03 AM
Fred, when you run the shaft through the headstock to work on the tip, like in the first photo, what do you use to support the other end of the shaft?



=====================

BrakenRun
06-09-2003, 01:23 PM
I made homemade gizmo that works great for me. Spent about $50 for the whole thing. I will send you pics if you would like for me to and tell you what I did to come up with it. Brakenrun

Terry
06-10-2003, 05:53 AM
I just want to say thanks for all the response's and private e-mails as well as the pictures. Thanks, Terry