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Kato
03-28-2002, 12:35 PM
I have never played with the Sardo gizmo and I definitely don't agree with doing anything to damage the table. Here is my question. On a table that racks well, balls freeze in the wooden triangle, will the balls freeze for the Sardo gizmo or MUST you beat the tar out of that table. Seems to me that it should work.

Kato

03-28-2002, 01:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Kato:</font><hr> I have never played with the Sardo gizmo and I definitely don't agree with doing anything to damage the table. Here is my question. On a table that racks well, balls freeze in the wooden triangle, will the balls freeze for the Sardo gizmo or MUST you beat the tar out of that table. Seems to me that it should work.

Kato <hr></blockquote>


as i understand it, the original idea was that the sardo would press the balls down and that was it. problem was, it did not work. even on new cloth there would be some separations. the force that the sardo produces just isn't enough to get the job done. then, in the first of many moves to save the thing, they started "training" the cloth at which point it becomes actually easier just to herd the balls into the holes by hand.

i do a finger roll of the balls while racking which, on most cloth, tightens them up nicely. it is actually making a small dent in the cloth which holds them in place without pounding. my simonis is now over a year old. i have never allowed anyone to ever pound on or tap balls into place so it still racks real fine.

dan

Troy
03-28-2002, 01:27 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Kato:</font><hr> I have never played with the Sardo gizmo and I definitely don't agree with doing anything to damage the table. Here is my question. On a table that racks well, balls freeze in the wooden triangle, will the balls freeze for the Sardo gizmo or MUST you beat the tar out of that table. Seems to me that it should work.

Kato <hr></blockquote>

On new cloth where the balls rack easily, anything works well. The SARDO gizmo would function, but at approx. $150 per, what would be the point ?? The two small marks (dots) would still need to be put on the cloth since you really can't see the spot through all the excess plastic. Once the table has a few small natural dings, things get a bit different.

Troy

Tom_In_Cincy
03-28-2002, 01:36 PM
making a small indentation on the cloth, (teaching the table to accept the balls in position) has been a practice by many players for a long time. You can achieve this level of racking balls on new cloth much easier than old cloth.

I don't like the idea of paying $150 for a rack that the same results can be achieved from a good wooden rack and some experience.

Rod
03-28-2002, 01:44 PM
Hey Dan, I do the same, the finger roll. It works very well even on tables that are difficult to rack. Sometimes though they are so bad because of other people's racks, racking sideways and what not, that it's near impossible. I usually ask for a table brush and brush the area, which helps.

Rod
03-28-2002, 02:12 PM
I agree Tom, it really ridiculous. It's not even realistic for a room to own racks like the Sardo. What would the table time be if that rack was used? They will have to be replaced and that hurts the bottom line. Even 20 to $25 for a good wooden rack is more of an expense than the average pool room owner wants to spend, but has to when they get abused or broken.

Troy
03-28-2002, 02:19 PM
My favorite table mechanic says a big portion of the racking problem comes from buid-up UNDER the spot which no amount of vacuuming can get to. His solution is to remove the spot, GENTLY message the spot area with moist fingers and replace the spot. It seems to help 'cuz nobody has even come close to hitting the break pot at our weekly tourney in 6 weeks.

Troy...~~~ I can't remember the last time a 9 was made against my rack... /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

03-28-2002, 03:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> making a small indentation on the cloth, (teaching the table to accept the balls in position) has been a practice by many players for a long time. You can achieve this level of racking balls on new cloth much easier than old cloth.

I don't like the idea of paying $150 for a rack that the same results can be achieved from a good wooden rack and some experience. <hr></blockquote>

my problem is that no two people will pound the balls in the same place so pretty quickly you got all kinds of dents and balls rolling off the rack. table brush is best.

one other thing i have not seen mentioned is that the sardo has the impact resistance of fine china. by the end of a tournament it's common for them to have a pile of broken ones somewhere in a corner. think what the youngsters in the local pool room could do to one of those.

dan

Tom_In_Cincy
03-28-2002, 03:36 PM
While at the US Open last year, the players were doing the racking with the Sardo. I saw lots of players having trouble and getting someone from the Sardo crew to do the racking. Sometimes the rack had to be replaced.

When you are finished racking the balls, the rack was being placed on the floor under the tables. Some of the players were just tossing them on the carpet. Those racks eventually had to be replaced. They broke.

It was not an interesting event from the "Break" standpoint. I was dissapointed because of this.. guess I am getting old and use to my ways. Breaking has always been a huge part of the game of 9 ball. Now it seems that it is not what it was just a few years ago.. too bad for me..

Ralph S.
03-29-2002, 03:36 AM
My thoughts on the Sardo are basically it is a waste of money, they are poorly constructed, and a good wooden rack or plastic for that matter will last much longer if the equipment is used properly. Just my 2 cents worth.
Ralph S.